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TORONTO STAR

Ottawa says it will support Toronto in housing asylum-seekers after Ford snub (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
The federal government says it is working directly with the city to house asylum-seekers after the province, under Premier Doug Ford, refused to help in co-ordinating a response. Toronto is under pressure to house hundreds of refugees, including 800 that having been living in two college dormitories. The asylum-seekers, including more than 250 children, need to be rehoused in just over three weeks when the dorms are returned to student use. “With Toronto facing pressure to find housing for this cohort of individuals, in-depth discussion has resulted in strong collaboration between Toronto and the federal government to ensure this matter will be resolved in advance of the early August deadline,” a release from immigration minister Ahmed Hussen’s office said Monday. Read more: Editorial | Doug Ford must end dangerous rhetoric on asylum seekers Toronto can’t handle influx of refugee claimants, Tory tells Ottawa More than half of refugee claimants in Toronto’s temporary shelters are children, new figures show That release promised “active support” for Toronto but few details. It also outlined that immediate aid earlier promised for Ontario, totalling $11 million, would be sent directly to Toronto, not to the province, to be dispersed. That money will be available “in the coming weeks,” the release said. Mayor John Tory has continually called for help in housing refugees, many of whom are making their way across the border from the United States into Quebec and then on to Toronto. The latest numbers from Ottawa show fewer people are crossing the border that way in recent months. According to the release, June marked the fewest irregular border-crossers entering Canada in a year, at 1,263 people. In May, there were 57 claims made per day on average, compared to 39 in June. Toronto officials have totalled the direct costs of housing refugees claimants in 2017 and 2018 at $64.5 million and counting. Beyond funding, Tory has said they need help finding housing locations, with the city unprepared to close community centres and other city-owned spaces. Those living in the dormitories take precedence. “We are working with the city to locate alternative spaces for those people,” Mathieu Genest, a spokesperson from Hussen’s office, told the Star on Monday. Tory thanked Hussen and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Monday, calling it “an important first step” that he knows won’t be the last. “I’m confident that the federal government will honour its commitment to helping Toronto and that more co-operation, including funding, will be forthcoming,” he said in an emailed statement. Jennifer Pagliaro is a Toronto-based reporter covering city politics. Follow her on Twitter: @jpags
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Tories sending mixed messages on sex-education curriculum (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
Ontario’s new Progressive Conservative government is sending mixed messages on its decision to teach the 1998 sex-education curriculum, which predates Google, social media and same-sex marriage. While Education Minister Lisa Thompson reiterated the modern 2015 syllabus, opposed by social conservatives, is being scrapped, she insisted issues of consent, gender, same-sex relationships, and cyber safety would still be taught this fall, even though those elements are not included in the old curriculum. “We are going to be preparing our students and preparing them for the realities of 2018 and we’re going to be embracing what was being taught in 2014,” Thompson said Monday. At that time, students learned the 1998 curriculum, which does not address those issues. “What we’ll be taking a look at and rolling back to 2014 with is specifically the curriculum that embraces preparing students for the realities of today. We will be rolling back our sex-ed focus. What we’ll be looking at is the developing sexual relations. That’s the part in the curriculum that we’ll be taking a look at,” she said. The rookie minister bolted from reporters after taking questions for less than three minutes. Four hours later, she issued a 210-word statement saying the 1998 syllabus “leaves ample space to discuss current social issues.” “As of today, we have made no decisions on what the new curriculum will look like. The final decision on the scope of the new curriculum will be based on what we hear from Ontario parents,” said Thompson, noting Premier Doug Ford would keep his election promise to consult on the curriculum. Last Wednesday, she unilaterally announced “the sex-ed component is going to be reverted back to the manner in which it was prior to the changes that were introduced by the Liberal government.” That meant returning to the 20-year-old curriculum instead of the updated one covering subject matter like LGBT relationships, gender identity, cyberbullying, and the dangers of sexting. Since then, the Tories have been taking heat from parents, educators, community activists and political rivals. NDP Leader Andrea Horwath blamed the fledgling government for sparking confusion. “It’s reprehensible and irresponsible that this government has left everything in such disarray that educators in our province aren’t even aware … of what’s going to happen come September. That’s not the way education systems are supposed to be operated,” she said. Horwath said that “what we need to do is make sure that the education of our youth takes priority over Mr. Ford’s favours to his social conservative friends. That’s the bottom line.” She also accused the Tory government of “flying by the seat of its pants. “It seems to me that the only thing they’ve told the public is that they are going back to the 1998 curriculum. That is not going to keep our children safe. That does not include things like cyberbullying. It does not include things like consent,” the NDP leader said. “Those things weren’t in the curriculum back in 1998 and so how it’s suddenly going to appear in the curriculum overnight or within a couple of weeks, and the education professionals in our province are supposed to be able to deal with this, I have no idea,” she said. “It does not make any sense.” Interim Liberal Leader John Fraser said it’s not clear what Thompson is talking about. “It’s been taught for three years. What was taught before then was the 1998 curriculum, so they’ve cancelled the most consulted piece of curriculum ever in Ontario — 2,700 teachers, 4,000 parents, 700 students,” said Fraser. “I don’t know what she’s talking about. There’s no third curriculum. Somehow there’s some magical third curriculum that nobody knows about?” he said. Green Leader Mike Schreiner said it seems as if the Tory government has “declared war on the modern world. “Most people want a modern curriculum because they recognize that it’s 2018, not 1998,” said Schreiner. Ford promised to revisit the curriculum as a sop to his social conservative supporters, who oppose abortion rights and same-sex marriage. The updated syllabus the Tories are scrapping includes teaching proper names for body parts and genitals in Grade 1, which is a change child-abuse investigators had long urged. In Grade 3, the concept of same-sex relationships is introduced. Students in Grade 4 are taught about online safety as well as puberty. In Grade 6, they learn what masturbation is, as well as about consent and healthy relationships. Grade 7 students are warned about the risks of “sexting” and learn about sexually transmitted diseases and informed about oral and anal sex. With Files From Rob Ferguson Robert Benzie is the Star's Queen's Park bureau chief and a reporter covering Ontario politics. Follow him on Twitter: @robertbenzie Kristin Rushowy is a Toronto-based reporter covering Ontario politics. Follow her on Twitter: @krushowy
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Dig ends at property linked to Bruce McArthur (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
After finding human remains on almost every day of the dig, Toronto police have completed a meticulous excavation behind a Leaside home linked to alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur. Earlier this month, a team of more than 20 investigators began combing through a steep, forested ravine behind the home on Mallory Cres., a location that’s become a key site in the largest forensic investigation in Toronto police history. That probe has only grown since July 5, when investigators uncovered human remains just hours into the first day of the search. Det.-Sgt. Hank Idsinga, the lead homicide detective on the case, said human remains were found virtually every day, though he stressed that could include something as small as, for example, a bone fragment or tooth. “We essentially recovered different parts every day that we were digging there,” Idsinga said in an interview Monday. Investigators determined where to dig — or dig deeper — through a combination of excavation and canine-assisted searches. The spots where the dogs provided indications there could be human remains were searched first by a team including police and a forensic anthropologist, who sifted through countless buckets of soil. Police regularly brought in the dogs, watched which areas they responded to, then continued to excavate. The process was repeated until investigators determined the soil within the ravine, which they previously described as a large compost pile, had been sufficiently searched. “At the end of the day, I’m pretty confident that we’ve done about as thorough a search as we can possibly do, and hopefully nothing else turns up there in the future,” Idsinga said. The excavation’s conclusion marks the completion of searches at the home where McArthur worked for years as a landscaper. But the discoveries of human remains have opened up another phase of the months-long investigation, requiring more forensic testing that could create new avenues of inquiry. McArthur, 66, is facing eight counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of men with links to Toronto’s Gay Village that are alleged to have occurred between 2010 and 2017. The remains of seven men were found earlier this year, buried in large planters located on the same Mallory Cres. property. The remains of the eighth victim, Majeed Kayhan, have not been located. Idsinga has previously said the remains discovered this month could be linked to Kayhan or to the seven other men. They also may be those of a ninth, previously unknown victim. Idsinga said he doesn’t believe that to be the case, but would not provide any further details. Identification can be done through fingerprints, dental records or DNA, with each process taking progressively longer. Depending on which route is taken, results could come back as early as this week or within the next few months. Forensic testing is also continuing in cold cases that Toronto police are currently reviewing to determine whether there are any links to McArthur. Police have searched nearly 100 properties linked to McArthur through his landscaping business, but human remains have only been found at Mallory Cres. More tips have been generated since the latest excavation began, creating more leads for investigators to follow and which could mean further searches of other properties, Idsinga said. McArthur is charged in the deaths of Kayhan, Selim Esen, Andrew Kinsman, Dean Lisowick, Soroush Mahmudi, Skandaraj Navaratnam, Abdulbasir Faizi and Kirushnakumar Kanagaratnam. He is due in court later this month.
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U.S. files World Trade Organization complaint against Canada’s retaliatory tariffs (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
WASHINGTON—U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration has filed a World Trade Organization complaint against the retaliatory tariffs Canada imposed on U.S. products in response to Trump’s tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum. Canada has previously launched a WTO challenge against the U.S. tariffs, which Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland calls illegal. The basic argument from the Trump administration, announced Monday, is that Trump’s tariffs are legal but the retaliation is not. The U.S. announced WTO disputes on Monday against not only Canada’s retaliatory tariffs but also those imposed by China, the European Union, Mexico and Turkey. “The actions taken by the president are wholly legitimate and fully justified as a matter of U.S. law and international trade rules. Instead of working with us to address a common problem, some of our trading partners have elected to respond with retaliatory tariffs designed to punish American workers, farmers and companies. These tariffs appear to breach each WTO member’s commitments under the WTO agreement,” U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in a statement. Under WTO rules, countries are allowed, under certain conditions, to impose temporary “safeguard” tariffs to protect a domestic industry against a damaging surge in imports. Other countries are allowed to retaliate. Canada and other countries have said that the U.S. tariffs appear to be improper safeguards. But the Trump administration argues that they are not safeguards at all. Rather, the U.S. says, they are being imposed under a national security rule under which retaliation is not allowed. Trump invoked a controversial national security provision of U.S. trade law as his official justification for the 25 per cent steel tariffs and 10 per cent aluminum tariffs. But he has frequently made a different argument in his speeches, saying that the purpose of the tariffs is to fix trade relationships he believes are unfair. It could take “two or three years” to settle the WTO disputes related to the U.S. tariffs, said Lawrence Herman, a Canadian trade lawyer. He said the case is “critical,” since it raises issues “that have never been litigated in the WTO before” — and since Trump’s commitment to the WTO already seems to be wavering. “A defeat by the U.S. would be viewed as catastrophic, and another indication, in Mr. Trump’s view, of how unreliable the WTO is and how biased it is against the United States. But I don’t think the U.S. is on particularly firm ground on this one,” Herman said, arguing that the circumstances do not justify national security tariffs. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has said it is absurd and insulting to use a national security provision against Canada, a close military ally. Trump has scoffed. His officials have argued that while Canada, itself, is not a national security threat, the weakness of U.S. steel and aluminum producers is a security threat. On Monday, Freeland spokesperson Adam Austen repeated Freeland’s criticism of the U.S. tariffs and her defence of Canada’s tariffs, which Austen called “measured” and “perfectly reciprocal.” “The tariffs imposed by the United States on Canadian steel and aluminum are unacceptable and illegal,” Austen said. “As Minister Freeland has said repeatedly, it is absurd to view any trade with Canada as a national security threat to the U.S.” Canada imposed retaliatory tariffs on 235 U.S. products on July 1. U.S. steel was hit with a 25 per cent tariff. U.S. aluminum and other products, ranging from soups to sleeping bags, were hit with a 10 per cent tariff. Read more: An aisle-by-aisle look at how to buy Canadian at the grocery store Everything you wanted to know about the Canada-U.S. trade war but were afraid to ask Anti-American hostility could drive U.S. expats out of Canadian workplaces, researcher says
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Energy minister dodges questions about cost of cancelling green contracts (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
Energy Minister Greg Rickford is refusing to say how much it will cost taxpayers to cancel 758 renewable energy contracts in an effort to save $790 million, as opposition parties accuse him of leaving Ontarians in the dark. “It’s still money out the door. The people deserve to know that,” said Green Party Leader Mike Schreiner. “It’s very disturbing.” Rickford, a former federal cabinet minister defeated in the 2015 Trudeau sweep before making a provincial comeback under Ford, said Monday that critics should focus on the money that will be left in taxpayers’ pockets by axing the unnecessary projects across the province, which has a surplus of electricity. Legislation will be introduced to ensure cancellation costs “are as low as they can be,” he added. “There will be some and we’ve put them in the perspective of how much we’re actually saving. And $790 million from where I come from is a lot of money.” It’s believed the legislation will bar lawsuits. But Rickford (Kenora-Rainy River) repeatedly evaded questions on the total costs after the new government faced its first question period in the Legislature, walking away from reporters who chased him down two flights of stairs to the lobby. Read more: Tories zap 758 green energy contracts in Ontario Ford Conservatives ready to hit the brakes on electric vehicle rebates Incoming Premier Doug Ford quietly axes Green Ontario Fund “When the net savings to the taxpayers is $790 million, I’m sure you guys know the word net…means a positive balance,” he replied when asked which gross number was used to reach the savings figure. “We’ll get back to you,” an aide said as she tried to stop the flow of questions about the projects, which the government says have not yet reached “development milestones.” Rickford announced the cancellations Friday afternoon in a news release with few details. Rivals are using the cancellations to rekindle memories of the previous Liberal government’s gas plants scandal, where power stations slated for Oakville and Mississauga were scrapped before the 2011 election, with costs initially billed in the tens of millions. The auditor general later concluded the controversial moves could cost up to $1.1 billion over 20 years. New Democrat MPP Peter Tabuns said the government is “forcing unknown costs” of scrapping the projects onto their proponents, which include small towns and First Nations communities. “Why won’t the premier review these contracts in a transparent process that is based on evidence and the public interest?” he asked. Schreiner said the governing party — which in opposition hounded the Liberal government over gas plants costs — is also mum on details about the purported $790 million in savings. “Is that over a year? Is that over 10 years? Is that over 20 years? They haven’t been very clear on that,” Schreiner said. The government will table separate legislation to axe the White Pines wind turbine project on Lake Ontario south of Belleville, and has promised similar legislation to limit the province’s liability. Proponents have said they are owed about $100 million. Meanwhile, Transportation Minister John Yakabuski said the government is sticking to its plan to end taxpayer subsidies for electric and hybrid cars despite complaints from motorists who have paid deposits on Tesla models that won’t be delivered until after the deadline. The incentives of up to $14,000 will still be paid on eligible vehicles that have been delivered to buyers, registered and plated by July 11. For motorists who agreed to buy vehicles on dealer lots or ordered vehicles before July 11, the subsidies will be paid only if the cars are delivered, registered and plated by Sept. 10. “We extended it to Sept. 10 so that people would have an ample amount of time,” Yakabuski told the Star. “Tesla does not have a dealer network. They deal directly with the consumer and our intention in extending it for the other models was to protect the dealer networks that provide jobs and work for people here in Ontario.” As first reported by the Star on June 20, the subsidies were cancelled because they were funded by the previous Liberal government’s cap-and-trade program to fight climate change, which the Ford administration is cancelling. While Environment Minister Rod Phillips said Monday the government will come up with its own plan to fight climate change that does not put an onerous burden on the economy, Interim Liberal Leader John Fraser said that’s not good enough. “There is no plan and that’s very concerning,” he said. “I think most Ontarians expect their government to have a plan for climate change. This government does not.”
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Report shows more people biking to work in 7 suburban areas in Toronto (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
Claude Alain cycles almost five kilometres to and from his workplace in North York every day. The Yonge and Eglinton resident uses side streets to get to Baycrest Health Sciences near Bathurst St. and Hwy. 401, where he is a senior scientist. Despite a lack of safe bike infrastructure, the area where he works has seen a slight growth in the number of people biking to work from 2006 to 2016, a new report indicates. “It’s good for the environment,” Alain said. “It’s a good workout … when you’re done from work, I like getting on the bike and going home and it kind of separates work from home.” The report, put out by the Toronto Centre for Active Transportation (TCAT), an organization advocating for a better cycling and pedestrian environment, analyzed census data in the city’s three community council areas, Scarborough, North York and Etobicoke York, and found the majority of the suburbs remained static, with some slight increases and decreases in cycling to work. Seven areas saw increases ranging from 1 to 3 per cent over the time frame. In a part of south Etobicoke, the rate was even higher. Five of them are near hospitals or post-secondary schools: Rexdale around Finch Ave. and Hwy. 27, south Etobicoke (Long Branch, New Toronto and Mimico), Willowdale around Finch Ave. and Bathurst St., Lawrence Manor around Bathurst and Hwy. 401 and Bendale around Ellesmere and McCowan roads. “These hospitals and college campuses create employment hubs,” said TCAT’s Yvonne Verlinden, the report’s author. “That’s real opportunity and people might live close enough to their workplaces to cycle.” Alain said he’s seen more people riding bikes in his neighbourhood. “It seems to increase progressively,” he said. Verlinden agrees, adding she thinks there’s growing interest in suburban cycling. “I think people often see the suburbs as uniform like ‘Oh, the suburbs are all the same’ but that’s not really true and that’s what we discovered through our Scarborough Cycles program,” she said. “Neighbourhoods are very different from one to another, and there’s places where there’s higher density, more destinations that you can cycle to and these are places where we might see some increase and might be useful to go in and do some encouragement.” Scarborough Cycles started in 2015 and aims to promote cycling in the neighbourhood. TCAT and its partners have opened community bike hubs that offer access to bicycles, tools and more throughout Scarborough to achieve its goal. The report found Wexford around Victoria Park and Lawrence avenues and Oakridge around Victoria Park and Danforth avenues to be outliers as they’re not near schools or hospitals, but the latter location is near one of its bike hubs, which wasn’t open when the data was collected. “Extensive research went into the selection of these sites,” the report stated. “Factors such as density of short trips, household car ownership, and available cycling infrastructure were used to identify neighbourhoods with the greatest cycling potential, so it is not surprising that this neighbourhood saw an increase in cycling.” In order to increase cycling overall in the suburbs, Verlinden said there needs to be more safe infrastructure, more bike shops and the “cultural norm needs to shift so that this becomes (a) mainstream” method of transportation. “The suburbs have all this potential,” she said. “We thought we’d like to explore it further and start to incubate cycling culture beyond the downtown.” Aaron D’Andrea is a reporter with Metroland Media Toronto. He can be reached at adandrea@toronto.com . Follow him on Twitter and Toronto.com on Facebook
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Richard Griffin: Blue Jays right-hander Marcus Stroman needs to mature before he can find true success (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
This is a column written in direct reaction to Sunday’s controversial post-game incident involving Marcus Stroman, who angrily stormed away from a media session outside the clubhouse at Fenway Park following yet another Blue Jays loss to the Boston Red Sox. He didn’t like a question from Sportsnet’s Arash Madani. The question from Madani, one of the most professional reporters in the business, was properly left to the end of the scrum because it had nothing to do with the game that had just taken place, a 5-2 loss to the Sox in which Stroman had allowed four runs in five innings, running his season record to 2-7 with a 5.86 ERA. As the cameras shut down and Stroman stalked away, he turned and ranted, “I’m f—ing terrible! We’re f—ing terrible! And you’re asking about Nat f—ing Bailey!” Stroman was referring to the beautiful home ballpark of the Class-A Vancouver Canadians, where he broke in as a first-year pro in 2012. The reason Madani asked the question — meant to be part of another video story — is that because, other than after his own starts, Stroman makes sure he is not available to any media for any type of interview. And the Jays have allowed that. As a disclaimer, it should be noted going in that Stroman doesn’t like me. He believes that there is no such thing as constructive criticism. He believes that it’s all mean-spirited, most of it stemming from a deep sense of jealousy from outsiders because he is successful and making a lot of money despite being, uh, short. I wrote a column early in 2016 when he was emerging in a breakout season. I suggested it was too early in his career, that he hadn’t done enough to call him a true major-league starting ace. He angrily called me out in the middle of the clubhouse and, with Josh Donaldson doing an excited, hilarious play-by-play of the exchange, suggested that I was suggesting he could not be an ace because he wasn’t tall enough and wasn’t white enough. That ended the three-minute conversation and we haven’t spoken one-on-one since — his choice. I have asked. It was around that same time Stroman blocked me on Twitter. He has since blocked other media members and, in fact, has even blocked at least one fan that dared criticize him. A young cousin, Paul Flood, drove to Cleveland along with hundreds of other Jays fans earlier this year. After a rainout he waited outside Progressive Field for an autograph. When Stro emerged, Paul asked. He pulled his hoodie down over his head and brushed past. Later that night, the fan went on Twitter to explain his disappointment and later discovered he was now blocked on both Twitter and Instagram. The bottom line is that Stroman was right about both him and his team being terrible heading into the break, but he needs to mature before he can find true success in the major leagues. He expresses his love for the organization and the city, yet whenever you see him interviewed, when it’s his turn to appear before the cameras, he seems to always make sure he’s wearing something featuring the Stroman brand. It’s never the Jays’ hat or other gear. That sends a message. Yes, Stroman is right. The Jays have been terrible. This is a pitcher that definitely should have better statistics in 2018. There is no doubt about that. He is a groundball machine that needs solid defence behind him. It hasn’t been there. In the first inning Sunday, with a chance to escape the inning with a runner on first and one out, Devon Travis charged a grounder, missed a swipe tag, then bobbled the transfer for an error, with the ball and the man rolling to the mound to join Stroman. No outs were made. A head shake. Stroman needed 12 more pitches to get out of the first. After that, in the fifth, Sandy Leon stroked a drive to the warning track in left field that Teoscar Hernandez shied away from, intimidated by the quirky Green Monster. That turned into a double and led to two more runs. Sure, that’s frustrating. Stroman, it seems, only likes preaching to the choir. It’s almost Trumpian. He offers up all clichés at his once-every-five-days media session, believing instead that his 467,500 Twitter followers, 503K Instagram fans, and the occasional use of Derek Jeter’s invention, the Players’ Tribune, are all that he needs. Stroman needs to expand his professional horizons, paying more attention to history and his employer — and to his teammates. The game is bigger than one man. I recall after Game 1 of the 1988 World Series between the L.A. Dodgers and Oakland, when Kirk Gibson had just ended the game for a Dodgers win with one of the most memorable home runs in World Series history. When the A’s clubhouse opened to media, future hall-of-famer Dennis Eckersley, who allowed the bomb, stood in front of his locker and answered wave after wave of similar questions about his failure in the spotlight. That’s class. I have had a Jays teammate look around when I approached to talk to make sure Stroman was not watching. Leaders don’t do that. The organization has permitted this anti-social behaviour and can be part of the solution. Stroman believes he doesn’t get enough respect from media. It’s a two-way street. He may take this as spiteful criticism but it is only meant to be constructive. The Jays’ second half can only get better — can’t it? Richard Griffin is a sports columnist based in Toronto. Follow him on Twitter: @rgriffinstar
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Three children, two adults taken to hospital after crash in North York (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
Five people were taken to hospital early Monday morning after a crash on Hwy. 401, paramedics report. Around 12:45 a.m., paramedics responded to the scene of a three vehicle collision in the eastbound lanes at Leslie St. Two women, one in her 50s and one in her 60s, were taken to a local hospital with minor injuries, while three children were transported to trauma centres. One of the children was in life-threatening condition. It is not known if all involved were in the same vehicle or in separate vehicles. Inori Roy is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star’s radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @royinori
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Toronto gripped by heat, humidity and chance of a thunderstorm today (lun., 16 juil. 2018)
While a thunderstorm watch saw the city under dark clouds for much of Monday, Toronto is set for more sun before the rain clouds return for the weekend. On Monday, the forecast called for a high of 31 C, with mainly sunny skies in the morning, but in mid-afternoon Environment Canada issued a thunderstorm warning for the city and surrounding areas, warning of strong wind gusts, large hail, and heavy rain. By the late afternoon, that warning was downgraded to a watch. The roller-coaster came in after days of relentless heat and humidity in the city, with temperatures reaching the high 30s last week, after the weather agency issued several heat warnings and called for high UV levels. The agency is forecasting more moderate warm weather this week, with temperatures resting in the high 20s. The city will see a high of 27 C on Tuesday, Thursday and Friday. It will be slightly cooler on Wednesday, with a high of 25 C. Despite the slightly cooler temperatures, the effects of early July’s consecutive heat waves is still being dealt with. The province’s coroner’s office is currently investigating three heat-related deaths in Ontario, while Quebec health authorities reported that up to 70 people may have died due to heat wave conditions. With files from Clare Rayment Inori Roy is a breaking news reporter, working out of the Star's radio room in Toronto. Follow her on Twitter: @royinori
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