http://www.guardian.co.uk/

The Guardian

Middle East crisis live: No plan for immediate retaliation against Israel, senior Iranian official says after blasts reported near Isfahan (ven., 19 avril 2024)
Discussion ‘leans more towards infiltration than attack’ says anonymous Iranian official as US says Israel has carried out military operation Full report: Israel has carried out airstrikes on Iran, US officials say What we know so far about Israel’s strike on Iran What’s in Isfahan? The city home to Iranian nuclear facilities It’s 7:24am in Tehran and 6:54 In Tel Aviv. Let’s get a reminder of what we know so far: US officials have confirmed that Israel has carried out military operations against Iran but did not describe those operations. The Israeli military has told news agencies including Agence France-Presse and Associated Press: “We don’t have a comment at this time.” Iran’s state media reported explosions in the central province of Isfahan Friday Air defence systems over several Iranian cities were activated, state media reported, after the country’s official broadcaster said explosions were heard near the city of Isfahan. Iran’s Fars news agency reported “three explosions” were heard near the Shekari army airbase in the north-west of Isfahan province, while Iran’s space agency spokesperson Hossein Dalirian said “several” drones had been “successfully shot down”. Nuclear facilities in Isfahan were reported to be “completely secure”, Iran’s Tasnim news agency reported, citing “reliable sources”. Flights were suspended across swathes of Iran on Friday. “Iran’s air defence has been activated in the skies of several provinces of the country,” Tehran’s official IRNA news agency said. Mehr news agency reported that “flights to Tehran, Isfahan and Shiraz, and airports in the west, northwest and southwest have been suspended.” Flight-tracking software showed commercial flights avoiding western Iran, including Isfahan, and skirting Tehran to the north and east. There was no immediate comment from Dubai’s Emirates airline, which was operating several of the planes. Blasts were also reported in southern Syria, according to a local activist group. “There were strikes on a Syrian army radar position,” said Rayan Maarouf, who runs the Suwayda24 anti-government website that covers news from Sweida province in the south, reports AFP. Oil prices surged more than three per cent in early Asian trade on Friday after the reports of explosions. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Israel has carried out airstrikes on Iran, US officials say (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Iranian state media reports that drones have been shot down over Isfahan province in attack on Friday and that the nuclear site there is ‘completely safe’ Middle East crisis: live updates What we know so far about Israel’s strike on Iran What’s in Isfahan? The city home to Iranian nuclear facilities US officials have confirmed that Israel has carried out airstrikes against Iran as explosions were reported in the sky over the cities of Isfahan and Tabriz, while the Iranian government sought to play down the scale of the attack. Officials in Washington said Israeli forces were carrying out military operations against Iran but did not describe the character or scale of those operations. Iranian state media said that drones had been shot down over Isfahan province in the early hours, and showed live shots of morning traffic in Isfahan city after sunrise to show that the situation was calm. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

What we know so far about Israel’s strike on Iran (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
US officials have confirmed that Israel carried out a military operation against Iran, while state media reports air defences are active near the city of Isfahan Follow live for latest updates US officials have confirmed that Israel has carried out military operations against Iran. The officials said Israel warned the Biden administration earlier on Thursday that a strike was coming in the next 24 to 48 hours. According to CNN, the Israelis assured their US counterparts that Iran’s nuclear facilities would not be targeted. Iranian state media reported that air defence batteries had been activated after reports of explosions near a major airbase close to the city of Isfahan. The Iranian government appeared to play down the scale of the attack, with a senior commander in Iran’s army saying there was no damage in Isfahan, according to state TV. Isfahan is home to sites associated with Iran’s nuclear program, including its underground Natanz enrichment site. State television described all sites in the area as “fully safe” and the UN nuclear watchdog, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), confirmed there was no damage to any nuclear sites. The airbase close to Isfahan has long been home to Iran’s fleet of American-made F-14 Tomcats – purchased before the 1979 Islamic revolution. Airports in Tehran, Shiraz and Isfahan were closed and flights have been cleared from the western half of Iran, flight tracking website FlightRadar24 reported. Local warnings to aviators suggested the airspace may have been closed. At 8am local time some airports lifted restrictions, local media in Iran reported. Although UAE based FlyDubai cancelled all flight to Iran’s capital on Friday. Tensions across the region remain high after Iran launched hundreds of drones as well as cruise missiles towards Israel on Saturday, in the Islamic Republic’s first ever direct attack on the Jewish state, in response to the 1 April strike on an Iranian diplomatic building in the Syrian capital, Damascus, which killed a senior figure in Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards and eight other officers. On Thursday, Iran’s foreign minister told CNN that if Israel chooses to retaliate, Tehran’s response would be immediate. “If the Israeli regime commits the great error once again our response will be decisive, definitive and regretful for them,” Hossein Amir-Abdollahian said. However, a senior Iranian official told Reuters on Friday that Iran has no plan for immediate retaliation against Israel. “The foreign source of the incident has not been confirmed. We have not received any external attack, and the discussion leans more towards infiltration than attack,” the Iranian official said on condition of anonymity. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Those signed off feeling depressed classed as incapable of work, says Stride (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Work and pensions secretary attacks system of dealing with minor mental health problems as PM takes aim at ‘sicknote culture’ Nearly everyone who gets signed off work for feeling “a little bit depressed” is classified as incapable of work, according to a senior government minister, as Rishi Sunak prepares to announce a new drive to get sick people back into employment. Mel Stride, the work and pensions secretary, said on Friday morning that 94% of people who were signed off by their GP with minor mental health problems were listed as unable to work, contributing to what the prime minister will say is a “sicknote culture”. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Former SNP chief executive Peter Murrell charged in finance investigation (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Husband of Nicola Sturgeon was rearrested ‘in connection with the embezzlement of funds’ from party, say police Peter Murrell, the husband of the former first minister Nicola Sturgeon, has been charged in connection with embezzlement after being arrested for a second time by police investigating allegations regarding the funding and finances of the Scottish National party. Murrell, the former chief executive of the SNP, was first arrested and interviewed as a suspect by Police Scotland detectives in April 2023 at the home he shared with Sturgeon in Glasgow, but was released later that day pending further investigation. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Most UK dairy farms ignoring pollution rules as manure spews into rivers (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Exclusive: 80% of Welsh dairy farms inspected, 69% of English ones, 60% in Scotland and 50% in Northern Ireland breaching regulations The majority of UK dairy farms are breaking pollution rules, with vast amounts of cow manure being spilled into rivers. When animal waste enters the river, it causes a buildup of the nutrients found in the effluent, such as nitrates and phosphates. These cause algal blooms, which deplete the waterway of oxygen and block sunlight, choking fish and other aquatic life. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Taylor Swift: fans and critics react to new surprise double album The Tortured Poets Department (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Swifties take to social media to dissect lyrics and celebrate Swift’s 11th album on Friday as the musician releases 15 more songs Breakups, fantasies and her most cutting lyrics: inside The Tortured Poets Department The Tortured Poets Department review – fame, fans and former flames in the line of fire The Tortured Poets Department is just out but it is already splitting Taylor Swift fans – between those who have already listened to it after it leaked online early, and those who refused to listen out of loyalty to their favourite singer. Swift’s 11th studio album was released on Friday but all 16 tracks and lyrics began appearing on social media on Wednesday. Some fans – known as Swifties – refused to listen to the leaked album, insisting that “true fans” would wait for the official release, while others shared false links to the leak in attempts to stop people finding it. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Voting begins in India’s election with Modi widely expected to win third term (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
First phase in world’s largest democratic exercise begins, with 969 million people eligible to vote over six-week period Voting has begun in India’s mammoth general election, as Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata party hopes to increase its parliamentary majority amid allegations that the country’s democracy has been undermined since it came to power 10 years ago. India’s elections are the largest democratic exercise in the world, with more than 969 million voters, amounting to more than 10% of the world’s population. The voting began at 8am on Friday, when polling opened at 102 constituencies across the country, and will continue over the next six weeks, in seven phases, until 1 June. All the results will be counted and declared on 4 June. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Thames Water nationalisation plan could move bulk of £15bn debt to state (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Exclusive: Under Whitehall blueprint for water company some lenders could lose up to 40% of their money Thames Water could be renationalised, with the bulk of its £15.6bn debt added to the public purse, under radical plans being considered by the government, the Guardian can reveal. The blueprint, codenamed Project Timber, is being drawn up in Whitehall and would turn Britain’s biggest water company into a publicly owned arm’s-length body. Some lenders to its core operating company could lose up to 40% of their money under the plans. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

India seeks UK carbon tax exemption in free trade deal talks (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Exclusive: India seeking to use approach of UK election as bargaining chip and any exemption would be controversial India is demanding an exemption from the UK’s planned carbon tax as part of negotiations aiming to finalise a free trade deal before the UK election. India’s negotiating team have spent this week in London in a surprise set of talks to try to overcome the remaining hurdles to an agreement. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Half a million unpaid carers in UK not claiming £4,200 a year benefit (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Campaigners say underclaiming is a result of restrictions on taking on paid work and harsh penalties for accidental rule breaches As many as half a million unpaid carers in the UK who look after frail, ill and disabled loved ones are failing to claim the £4,200-a-year carer’s allowance despite experiencing high levels of poverty, according to new estimates. Campaigners said unpaid carers may have not claimed the benefit partly because of the strict limits dictating the amount of paid work they can undertake on top of their care duties, and the harsh penalties they face if they breach those rules. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Expansion plans require 85,000 more childcare places by September 2025 (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Pilot to explore how to repurpose unused school space to increase capacity for funded childcare An estimated 85,000 additional childcare places would be required by September 2025 to enable the government’s planned expansion of funded childcare for working parents in England, according to the Department for Education. A pilot will explore how to repurpose unused school space to support childcare and increase capacity. If successful, the scheme will be rolled out to expand funded childcare for eligible families of children as young as nine months old. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Guardian wins award for exposé of founders’ links to transatlantic slavery (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Press Awards recognise cross-platform Cotton Capital series, and there are wins for several Guardian reporters The Guardian has won a diversity award at the prestigious Press Awards after its exposé on its founders’ links to transatlantic slavery, while one of its reporters took home the award for news reporter of the year. Judges at the Press Awards called the Guardian’s cross-platform Cotton Capital series, encompassing news articles, long-form essays, podcasts, video, a magazine, a 15-part newsletter and social media content, a “breathtakingly honest mea culpa”. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘Humiliated’: carer made to pay back £3.8k after mistake declaring income (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Davina Ware applied for benefits to help look after husband Mike, 72, who has lived with Parkinson’s for 20 years The pain cuts through Davina Ware’s voice as she describes her experience of carer’s allowance, the meagre weekly benefit given to those heralded by the government as Britain’s “unsung heroes”. She feels “humiliated,” “devastated,” and “treated like a conniving thief” by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) since she received its demand, three months before her retirement, to repay nearly £4,000. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Rwanda bill: what does the latest delay mean? (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Flights have been pushed back to summer after the House of Lords spoke out for Afghans and refugees – here’s what to expect over the coming weeks Rishi Sunak’s plan to fly people seeking asylum to Rwanda this spring appears to have been put back to the summer after House of Lords insisted on changes to the scheme. On Thursday the prime minister’s spokesperson said the Lords were responsible for any delay after attaching unwanted amendments to the deportation bill. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

What is bitcoin halving – and will it affect the price? (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Process has coincided with a rise in price in the past and is due to take place again on Saturday Satoshi Nakamoto, the pseudonymous creator of bitcoin, still has an influence on the cryptocurrency nearly 14 years after disappearing. This week the protocol designed by Nakamoto – an individual or group of individuals who went silent in December 2010 – will trigger what is known as a “bitcoin halving”, a process that has coincided with price increases in the past. The latest halving is expected to take place on Saturday. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Taylor Swift: The Tortured Poets Department review – fame, fans and former flames in the line of fire (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
(Republic) Subtly detailed album splits the difference between 1989’s glossy pop-rock and Midnights’ understatement – and lets her ex Matty Healy have it in no uncertain terms Breakups, fantasies and her most cutting lyrics: inside Taylor’s Swift’s The Tortured Poets Department The two cliches used to describe the new release by a major star are that it’s long-awaited and eagerly anticipated. You could hardly describe Taylor Swift’s 11th studio album as long-awaited – it’s barely 18 months since her last album, Midnights, a blink of an eye in the release schedule of a pop superstar. She’s also put out another three hours of music in the interim, in the shape of bonus track-packed re-recordings of 2010’s Speak Now and 2014’s 1989. But The Tortured Poets Department is certainly eagerly anticipated. The torrential nature of Swift’s output is one reason behind her current position as not just pop’s biggest star, but a figure who dominates pop culture to such a preposterous degree you struggle for a historical comparison: we live in a world where her endorsement of a candidate is considered a potentially deciding factor in the US presidential elections and where the prime minister of Singapore is embroiled in a row with his Thai counterpart over exclusivity rights to the south-east Asian leg of Swift’s Eras tour. Among the countless other factors in her rise to omnipresence – her keen understanding of today’s altered media landscape and a desire for collective experience in a music world obsessed with individualised experiences – is, of course, her music, which can dim in comparison to the media noise. That’s a shame, because, as The Tortured Poets Department underlines, Swift is an authentically skilled songwriter: melodically gifted, thoughtful, witty and willing to take risks in a risk-averse era for pop. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Breakups, fantasies and her most cutting lyrics: inside Taylor’s Swift’s The Tortured Poets Department (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
What are the big takeaways from Swift’s new album? She’s refining her sound, confronting elements of her fanbase and done with romantic idealisation • Read Alexis Petridis’s four-star review of the album Swift named an entire album after the concept of her reputation and has been engaging with public perceptions of her as far back as 2010’s Speak Now; songs such as Mean, Blank Space and the gothic half of Reputation lash out directly at critics. But she’s never openly condemned her listeners before her new album The Tortured Poets Department, in songs that constitute some of its most daring moments. Who’s Afraid of Little Old Me? feels like a deservedly bitter, barbed update of the cutesier and more cloying Anti-Hero that suggests Swift is the way she is because of the twisted culture she grew up in and had to contort herself to fit into: “You taught me, you caged me, and then you called me crazy,” she seethes, sounding quite high on the fearsome power commentators have ascribed to her. I’ll tell you something right now I’d rather burn my whole life down Than listen to one more second of all this bitching and moaning I’ll tell you something about my good name It’s mine alone to disgrace Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

You be the judge: should my sister help me challenge our brother’s sexist views? (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Mina confronts Tom, but little sister Layla would rather keep the peace. You decide who’s right in this sister act? Find out how to get a disagreement settled or become a juror Confronting Tom’s toxic attitudes is good practice for my sister and will boost her confidence Mina wants to make a stand, but after a row, it’s me who has to deal with the aftershocks at home Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Meet the scientists on a new wildlife frontier: the mysterious sounds of the underground (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
More than 50% of the planet’s species live in the soil, but only a fraction have been identified – so far Read more: No birdsong, no water in the creek, no beating wings: how a haven for nature fell silent The sound of an earthworm is a distinctive rasping and scrunching. Ants sound like the soothing patter of rain. A passing, tunnelling vole makes a noise like a squeaky dog’s toy repeatedly being chewed. On a spring day at Rothamsted Research, an agricultural research institution in Herefordshire, singing skylarks and the M1 motorway are competing for the airways. But the attention here is on the soundscapes underfoot: a rich ecosystem with its own alien sounds. More than half of the planet’s species live in the soil, and we are just starting to tune into what they are up to. Beetle larvae, millipedes, centipedes and woodlice have other sound signatures, and scientists are trying to decipher which sounds come from which creatures. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘It taught me about brainwashing’: how reality show stars fell for a fake Prince Harry (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
A show in which women competed to date a royal lookalike was panned at the time as ‘fodder for the braindead’. But the contestants had been duped, as a new podcast reveals … Next month marks a decade since one of the most ridiculous reality shows ever aired on television. I Wanna Marry “Harry” was a dating show in which 12 American women dated Prince Harry, then the world’s most eligible bachelor. Only, obviously, it wasn’t him at all. The “Harry” in question was a lookalike: according to the show, a “99% lookalike” (I will let you be the judge). Airing on Fox in the US before making its way to ITV2, the reality show consisted of the dozen potential girlfriends being whisked to a secluded mansion in the Berkshire countryside, then going on a series of dates with the fake prince. It was constantly implied by the production team that they were in the presence of royalty: Harry was even referred to as “sir”, when really he was plain old Matt Hicks, an environmental consultant from Exeter who had had his hair dyed ginger. The stunts for the ruse were quite something: from “sir” being whisked away by men in sunglasses after a “security incident”, to fake paparazzi invading a date before being tackled to the ground. Fake Harry was even Photoshopped into an image alongside the real Prince William for a potential date to stumble across while Hicks went to the bathroom. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Homes for sale that have had an eco overhaul – in pictures (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Top rated retrofits: from a grand listed city centre penthouse dating back to the 1700s to a converted church in a pretty village Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Moving pictures: travelling cinema takes stories of ‘departures and dreams’ to Senegal (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Cinemovel is screening Oscar-nominated Io Capitano to packed houses around the country, highlighting the perils migrants face on the journey to Europe At about 1pm on Monday a 35-seater bus arrived in Pikine, a city east of the Senegalese capital, Dakar. A portable screen, projector, sound system and generator were unpacked to set up a temporary cinema in a lively neighbourhood where the scent of hibiscus and orange blossom fill the air. Pikine’s cultural centre was the first stop for Cinemovel, a travelling cinema that is showing the Oscar-nominated Italian film Io Capitano in the streets and villages of Senegal. It is part of an initiative run by the Cinemovel Foundation, an Italian group that has been bringing a touring cinema to remote parts of Africa since 2001. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Juliette Pavy: Sony World Photographer of the Year 2024 (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
The prestigious photographer of the year title has been awarded to Juliette Pavy for her series Spiralkampagnen: Forced Contraception and Unintended Sterilisation of Greenlandic Women. Pavy was selected from the 10 winners in the professional category; she receives a $25,000 prize, Sony equipment, and the opportunity to present a new body of work at the Sony World Photography Awards 2025 exhibition • Gallery – the Sony World Photography awards Juliette Pavy’s documentary series explores the severe and lasting impacts of an involuntary birth control campaign led by Danish authorities in Greenland in the 1960s and 1970s. It examines the Spiralkampagnen, in which several thousand Inuit women and girls, some as young as 12 years old, had intrauterine devices implanted without their consent. The project traces the programme’s origins through to the present day, including the ongoing investigation by the Danish government. Placing the victims’ perspectives at the forefront, the narrative structure of Pavy’s project is shaped by difficult and important reflections on the collective trauma experienced by a community. The series uses a variety of photographic formats, from situating shots of the city of Nuuk and its clinical spaces to X-ray imagery and archive photographs of the young women involved, alongside recent portraits of victims, doctors who worked in Greenland during and after the programme, and the Danish parliamentarian investigating the Spiralkampagnen today. Nuuk, the capital of Greenland, is located on the west coast and has a population of about 19,000. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Victimise people who raise a voice in Britain? Then destroy their families? Not in my name | George Monbiot (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Marcus Decker dared to protest on climate and was punished. Now he could be deported. Is that a humane democracy? When the traditional ruling class was obliged to concede to demands for democracy, it gave away as little as possible. We could vote, but it ensured that crucial elements of the old system remained in place: the House of Lords, the first-past-the-post electoral system, prerogative powers and Henry VIII clauses, and above all a legal system massively and blatantly biased towards owners of property. In combination, these elements ensured that the system remained predisposed to elite rule, even while it pretended the people were in charge. The portcullis excluding us from power has never been properly lifted since the Norman conquest. The relationship between rulers and ruled remains, in effect, a relationship between occupier and occupied. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Of course a society that demonises poverty will try to prosecute vulnerable, unpaid carers | Zoe Williams (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
The scandal, revealed by the Guardian, didn’t occur in a vacuum. The right’s casting of the poor as parasitic benefits cheats underpins it all The unpaid carer’s allowance in this country is £81.90 a week. It’s hard to see what serious thought went into arriving at that figure – any calculation of how much it costs to live on, for instance, or how much an unpaid carer is saving the government. Being without discernible curiosity about the lives of unpaid carers, or their contribution to society, it looks very much like a benefit handed down from on high; so at the very least, you’d expect the Department for Work and Pensions to keep on top of its administration. That is not what happened. Unpaid carers are allowed to earn £151 a week before it affects the benefit. In nearly 30,000 cases last year, people breached that limit, it’s thought almost always unknowingly, and the DWP allowed debts to rack up, sometimes running to thousands of pounds. This won’t be the first time it’s been observed how bureaucracies that seem lackadaisical and unequal to their own responsibilities become unbelievably tenacious and forceful when it comes to the debts of others. It is accused of intimidatory tactics, against people who may have committed only minor breaches, rewarding them with criminal records and penury that has forced some to sell their homes. Zoe Williams is a Guardian columnist Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

My family’s past, and Germany’s, weighs heavily upon me. And it’s why I feel so strongly about Gaza | Eva Ladipo (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
I fear we are forgetting lessons from that terrible history I don’t usually talk about my great-uncle Walter. Gen Walter Warlimont, as my grandfather’s brother was formally known, was head of the national defence department in the high command of the Wehrmacht, the armed forces of Nazi Germany. Only two people were between him and the Führer in the chain of command. Walter worked so closely with Hitler that the failed assassination attempt in July 1944 injured his arm. The orders he signed during wartime – about who to shoot to kill, about how to treat prisoners – meant he had hundreds of thousands of lives on his conscience. Not that Uncle Walter was the only one in the family who facilitated the Third Reich and the Holocaust. My paternal grandparents were very proud to have been among the very earliest members of Hitler’s party. My maternal grandfather – Walter’s brother – was the head of a factory in Vienna that made the guidance systems for the V2 rocket, a factory that was staffed by Russian and Ukrainian slave labourers. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

It’s sad that Hugh Grant v Rupert Murdoch won’t go to court, but good can come of it | Jane Martinson (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
The mogul has taken these hacking allegations out of the public arena. Use this moment to craft reforms that can be trusted True crime dramas, in which nobody wins but the lawyers, are not the kind of films that made Hugh Grant famous. His starring role in the long-running legal action against the Sun newspaper for phone hacking instead proves that real life is far more flawed and frustrating than film. After more than a decade of leading a campaign against what he called the “worst excesses of the oligarch-owned press”, Grant settled with Rupert Murdoch when offered such an “enormous” sum of money that to proceed would have seen him liable for even bigger costs. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Ben Jennings on Rishi Sunak’s plan to restrict cigarette sales – cartoon (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Yet again, we in Scotland have the lowest life expectancy in western Europe. Here’s how to improve it | Devi Sridhar (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
The Scottish government is right to target smoking, drinking and drug misuse. But the root cause remains: deprivation Every few years, headlines emerge about how Scots have the lowest life expectancy in western Europe. This was true in 2005, 2010, and most recently earlier this month, when Paul Johnston, the head of Public Health Scotland, highlighted that life expectancy stalled around 2014 to 2016, then declined in recent years. At the moment men and women in Scotland are expected to die just over two years earlier than those in England. What exactly is happening in Scotland to explain this pattern, and are we (I say “we” given that I’ve lived in the nation for roughly a decade) really that different from other parts of the UK and Europe? The first issue to highlight is that life expectancy differs based on where you live. In Glasgow, life expectancy varies hugely between the richer and poorer parts of the city. In 2021, if you lived in Pollokshields West, life expectancy was 83 years, while in Greater Govan it was 65.4 – a gap of 18 years. Averages hide a deeper story linked to deprivation and inequality within Scotland. Where and how you live plays a crucial role in how long you live. Prof Devi Sridhar is chair of global public health at the University of Edinburgh Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Britain’s defence policy is more like one big declaration of war | Owen Jones (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Instead of stockpiling weapons and stoking fears of coming conflict, we should be focusing on keeping the peace In our increasingly destabilised present, it is difficult not to see echoes of the run-up to the first world war. Back then, a standoff between two great power blocs led to a fatalism that a disastrous war was simply inevitable. If history does indeed repeat itself, that would be catastrophic for two reasons. First, because the mass slaughter turned out to be the warm-up act for worse in the rest of the 20th century. In many ways, we are still living in the aftermath. Second, because such a repetition would in fact prove the best case scenario; a nuclear inferno that devours human civilisation is a more probable outcome. In two newspaper articles last week, Sir Keir Starmer committed Labour to retaining nuclear weapons and to hiking defence spending to 2.5% of GDP. Prevailing political wisdom would suggest this offers necessary distance from his predecessor, though it should be noted that Labour’s 2017 and 2019 manifestos both promised to retain Trident and keep defence spending to at least 2%, the target Nato members are committed to reach. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

There should be no rush to replay Hipgnosis’s noisy stock market experiment | Nils Pratley (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
The sale of the music fund ends its tumultuous years as a listed company – and that may be for the best, for it and its investors So ends a stock market experiment that is unlikely to be repeated in a hurry: Hipgnosis Songs Fund, the music royalties company with songs by the likes of Beyoncé, Blondie and Chic, is to be sold to a US fund for less than its starting price in 2018 of 100p. The immediate point is that 93p a share, or £1.1bn, is a lot better than shareholders were looking at in recent months. The price went as low as 60p during the company’s bust-up with its own investment adviser, a suspension of dividends (unforgivable for a fund designed to turn royalties into income) and a writedown in the value of assets after a tortuous debate about valuation methodologies. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

The Guardian view on the catastrophe in Gaza: it must not be overshadowed by the Iran crisis | Editorial (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Hopes of a ceasefire have ebbed, concerns about an assault on Rafah endure, and aid remains wholly insufficient The Middle East is “on the precipice” and “one miscalculation, one miscommunication, one mistake, could lead to the unthinkable,” the UN secretary-general, António Guterres, warned on Thursday. Israel has vowed to retaliate to Iran’s weekend barrage of missiles and drones – itself a response to Israel’s killing of two generals at an Iranian diplomatic facility in Damascus. It is hard to have confidence in either’s ability to calibrate their actions when both have misjudged already. Yet the spectre of full-scale regional conflict, and the many deaths that could result, must not draw attention away from the almost 34,000 Palestinians already killed in Gaza, according to its health authorities, and the many more who will soon die without an immediate ceasefire and massive increase in aid in what Mr Guterres called a “humanitarian hellscape”. Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a response of up to 300 words by email to be considered for publication in our letters section, please click here. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

The Guardian view on Tory decline: splits, sleaze and a rush for the exit | Editorial (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Fresh allegations against a backbench MP highlight an end-of-era atmosphere in the Conservative party The Conservative party and government seem to be falling apart in front of our eyes. As his legislative programme becomes ever more vestigial, and his ratings plummet to new depths, Rishi Sunak’s future is now being counted in weeks. His would-be successors are openly jockeying for advantage in the next leadership contest, with Kemi Badenoch, Penny Mordaunt and Priti Patel all but declared as likely candidates. Meanwhile, in another part of the forest, Liz Truss is raising her standard of revolt yet again. Elsewhere, Boris Johnson fantasises about a recall to the colours too. Meanwhile, Tim Loughton’s recent decision not to stand again as a Conservative MP brought the list of prospective backbench retirees to 64 and counting. It is a list that arguably contains more Tory talent than the current cabinet. Do you have an opinion on the issues raised in this article? If you would like to submit a response of up to 300 words by email to be considered for publication in our letters section, please click here. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Hilary Cass’s report and the trans rights debate | Letters (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Readers respond to an article by Freddy McConnell and an editorial about Dr Hilary Cass’s review of NHS England’s gender identity services for children and young people In our view, Freddy McConnell’s opinion piece (Hilary Cass’s proposals are mostly common sense. She must reject anti-trans bias with the same clarity, 11 April) implies that support for the Clinical Advisory Network on Sex and Gender (CAN-SG) fundamentally undermines trans people’s identities and rights, and that clinicians who question the innate model of gender identity – as do CAN-SG members – do not have the best interests of patients at heart and are “denying the existence” of trans people. We reject these claims. In fact, it is suppression of research and debate in this area that undermines proper understanding of gender identity and the right to effective, safe medical treatment. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

A modern pilgrimage’s transformative power | Letters (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Norma Neill and Judith A Daniels respond to a Guardian leader on the long path to enlightenment Re your editorial (The Guardian view on pilgrimage: a 21st-century spiritual exercise, 14 April), my sister has just completed her third pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela in Spain. On this trip she met a young man who was walking the 500 miles with his probation officer. He had had the choice of walking the Camino or going to prison; for what offence she did not discover, but over the six weeks of walking she reports that she saw a transformation in the fitness and general wellbeing of both men. It would seem that the men and the justice system in Spain benefited. Norma Neill Askernish, South Uist Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Premier League and FA Cup semis: 10 things to look out for this weekend (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Two big Wembley meetings await in the Cup, while a desperation derby looks to be in store at Goodison Park There was a distinct end-of-season vibe at the Gtech Community Stadium after Brentford’s win over Sheffield United, with Thomas Frank and his players performing what amounted to a lap of honour as they took plaudits from fans relieved that the spectre of relegation had finally been banished. Of course only time will tell if the Bees become the first Premier League team to decamp to the metaphorical beach and Saturday’s match at Luton will provide a fair indication. Ravaged by injury with up to 11 players likely to be unavailable, Luton were on a hiding to nothing in their game against Manchester City but still emerged from the rout with their heads held high having restricted the champions to a one-goal lead until their capitulation after the hour mark. It is increasingly difficult to compliment Rob Edwards’ side without sounding condescending, but if it transpires that the Brentford side that turns up in Bedfordshire has mentally tapped out, the Premier League’s most dashing manager, his players and their fans are unlikely to have any complaints whatsoever. Barry Glendenning Luton v Brentford, Premier League, Saturday 3pm (all times BST) Sheffield United v Burnley, Premier League, Saturday 3pm Manchester City v Chelsea, FA Cup semi-final, Saturday 5.15pm Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

FA Cup replays fall victim to scramble for cash and chaotic decision-making | Paul MacInnes (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
FA’s latest move reflects a further weakening of the game’s heritage and will only boost the argument for independent regulation If you had been following the back pages over the past few months the changes to the format of the FA Cup would not have come as a surprise. Last month the Daily Mail reported that replays were to be scrapped, and a shift in the date of the final has been mooted for longer. It says a lot about the state of football in England, however, that the news did come as a surprise to many within the game. The outrage that accompanied it was perhaps less shocking. The game is facing governance challenges from a number of directions, some of which directly led to the new arrangements for the Cup. From next season, each of Uefa’s three club tournaments is to expand, from 32 to 36 teams, with eight fixtures for each side competing in the league phase. There will be more matches over more midweeks and room needs to be made in the calendar to accommodate them. To that effect, fewer replays for Premier League sides in January to March would be welcomed by them. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘We have a superior product’: Dukes maker invites Rob Key for talks over ball (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Owner of British Cricket Balls warns over ECB rash decisions Kookaburra has been used in early Championship matches The maker of Dukes balls has entered the debate on the trial use of the Kookaburra ball in county cricket and invited Rob Key, the England and Wales Cricket Board’s managing director of men’s cricket, to talk to him about the type of ball he wants to see. Dilip Jajodia, the managing ­director of British Cricket Balls Ltd which has owned the Dukes imprint since 1987, was ­responding to a story in the Guardian this week in which Key hailed the trial use of the Kookaburra in the county ­championship and called for it to be used permanently. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘Playing against 14’: Michail Antonio hits out at officials after West Ham’s exit (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Striker criticises refereeing after aggregate loss to Leverkusen David Moyes laments lack of ‘fresh legs’ but hails ‘terrific effort’ Michail Antonio hit out at the refereeing and said that it was like “playing against 14” after West Ham lost their Europa League quarter-final to Bayer Leverkusen 3-1 on aggregate. David Moyes’s side made a spirited attempt to recover from their 2-0 defeat in the first leg and were dreaming of knocking out the newly crowned Bundesliga champions after Antonio scored early on at the London Stadium. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Jürgen Klopp defends Salah’s finishing after Liverpool exit Europa League (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Salah scores penalty but misses big chance against Atalanta Klopp: ‘We didn’t lose the tie tonight, we lost it at home’ Jürgen Klopp said Liverpool squandered their Europa League chances at Anfield last week and insisted Mohamed Salah’s wastefulness was not the cause of their quarter-final exit against Atalanta. Liverpool were unable to overturn a 3-0 first leg deficit in the quarter-final despite dominating the first half and Salah scoring an early penalty. A 1-0 win signalled the last European game of Klopp’s Liverpool reign. The Liverpool manager admitted the failure to add a second goal was crucial in Bergamo but refused to pin the blame on Salah, who was guilty of the biggest miss. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Martínez the tainted hero as Aston Villa beat Lille in controversial shootout (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Long before Emiliano Martínez was booked for time-wasting 39 minutes into this tempestuous knockout tie, there was an air of inevitability that the Aston Villa goalkeeper would prove the hero. So he was, with Martínez saving superbly from Nabil Bentaleb and Benjamin André in a 4-3 penalty shootout victory after Matty Cash’s speculative late strike prevented Lille from advancing and took the game to extra time. Martínez was mobbed by his teammates, Morgan Rogers jumping for a piggyback as Villa’s players charged towards their delirious supporters stationed high in the stand at the opposite end. That, however, is only half of the story. The whole game boiled down to a ludicrous crescendo, Martínez the centre of attention. Of course, he relished being the pantomime villain as he took on a French team for the first time since his World Cup heroics for Argentina in Qatar, when he thwarted Kingsley Coman from 12 yards, and he was up to his old tricks. His every touch was jeered from the off by the locals and, already on a booking, he was cautioned again by the referee, Ivan Kruzliak, during the spot-kicks after being warned for gamesmanship – another dollop of shithousery, you could say – but avoided being sent off and leaving Villa in the unprecedented scenario of being without a goalkeeper for the rest of the shootout because cautions are not carried forward into penalties. At the time, nobody seemed too sure. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sports quiz of the week: London Marathon, FA Cup and Olympic teams (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Have you been paying attention to the big stories in football, athletics, cricket, basketball, snooker and golf? Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Chess: Four in close contention as Candidates reaches weekend climax (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
With just the final two rounds to come, Ian Nepomniachtchi, Hikaru Nakamura and Gukesh Domaraju share the lead while the world No 2 , Fabiano Caruana, is half a point behind With 12 rounds complete and just Saturday’s and Sunday’s final two rounds to come, the Candidates in Toronto could hardly be closer. Three players share the lead, another is just half a point behind. The €500k tournament will decide which of its eight contestants challenges China’s Ding Liren for his world crown later this year. Leaders after 12 rounds (of 14) were : Ian Nepomniachtchi (Russia), Hikaru Nakanmura (US), and Gukesh Dommaraju (India) all 7.5; Fabiano Caruana (US) 7; Praggnanandhaa Rameshbabu (India) 6. Three others follow. Key games to come are: Saturday’s round 13, Nepomniachtchi v Nakamura; Sunday’s round 14, Nakamura v Gukesh and Caruana v Nepomniachtchi. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘Reprehensible retreat’: fury as Scottish ministers scrap carbon emissions pledge (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Climate campaigners complain of short-termism as country abandons target to cut carbon emissions by 75% by 2030 Climate campaigners have accused Scottish ministers of being “inept” and “short-termist” after they scrapped Scotland’s target to cut carbon emissions by 75% by 2030. Màiri McAllan, the Scottish net zero secretary, confirmed her government had abandoned that target and would also drop legally binding annual targets on reducing carbon emissions, after damning criticism from a UK advisory committee. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Clean-up of Indian coal-fired power plants ‘could have saved 720,000 lives’ (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Researchers say early deaths may have been avoided over 10-year period if technology installed Research has estimated the health impacts from the coal-fired power plants that operate across India. Six hundred coal power plants generate more than 70% of India’s electricity. Despite regulations passed in 2015, fewer than 5% of these plants operate with modern systems to clean up air pollutants from their chimneys. In China, 95% of coal-fired power plants were fitted with clean-up technologies by 2013. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Plastic-production emissions could triple to one-fifth of Earth’s carbon budget – report (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Exclusive: By the middle of the century, pollution from plastic industry could ‘undermine world’s effort’ to control climate crisis By the middle of the century, global emissions from plastic production could triple to account for one-fifth of the Earth’s remaining carbon budget, an analysis has found. The stunning new estimates from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, published on Wednesday, provide yet more evidence that the plastic industry is “undermining the world’s efforts to address climate change”, said Heather McTeer Toney, executive director of the Bloomberg Philanthropies’ Beyond Petrochemicals campaign, which helped fund the new report. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Lethal heatwave in Sahel worsened by fossil fuel burning, study finds (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Deaths from record temperatures in Mali reportedly led to full morgues turning away bodies this month The deadly protracted heatwave that filled hospitals and mortuaries in the Sahel region of Africa earlier this month would have been impossible without human-caused climate disruption, a new analysis has revealed. Mali registered the hottest day in its history on 3 April as temperatures hit 48.5C in the south-western city of Kayes. Intense heat continued across a wide area of the country for more than five days and nights, giving vulnerable people no time for recovery. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Police to contact Tory MP Mark Menzies over campaign fund misuse allegations (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Development follows Labour calling for investigation into Tory MP alleged to have misused funds to pay off ‘bad people’ UK politics – latest updates A Conservative MP who was suspended over allegations that campaign funds were misused to pay off “bad people” is to be contacted by police over the matter. Keir Starmer earlier called for a police investigation into allegations that campaign funds were misused by the Fylde MP, Mark Menzies, who was also suspended as a government trade envoy to Colombia, Chile, Peru and Argentina. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Only 40 LNER intercity rail services to run on Saturday as train drivers strike (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Almost three in four services between London, Edinburgh and York will be cut in Aslef members’ stoppage A train drivers’ strike will lead to almost three in four services being cut on Saturday on LNER, which operates intercity trains between London, York and Edinburgh. Members of the Aslef union will take industrial action for 24 hours on 20 April – and also ban overtime during the weekend – in a dispute over terms and conditions, separate to the wider pay row that has led to strikes at all national rail operators across England. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Retail sales in Great Britain flatline as households continue to feel squeeze (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Shoppers cut back in March, with data likely to increase pressure on Bank of England over interest rates Business live – latest updates Retail sales in Great Britain unexpectedly stalled in March as consumers cut back on spending because of the cost of living, according to new data. British retail sales volumes stagnated at 0% in March after an increase of 0.1% in February, according to the Office for National Statistics. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Quarter of UK’s three- and four-year-olds own a smartphone, data shows (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Campaigners express concern at new Ofcom figures, which also show that half of under-13s are on social media A quarter of three- and four-year-olds in the UK now own a smartphone, while half of children under 13 are on social media, according to new data that comes as ministers consider banning all children under 16 from owning a mobile phone. The figures, from the communications regulator Ofcom, show high and rising rates of online activity by children of infant-school age, with 38% of five- to seven-year-olds using social media, compared with 30% a year ago, and 76% of them using a tablet. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Lost orchards and blossom flourish in placenames across England and Wales (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Doubling of related street, house and farm names since 1900 gives glimpse of flower ‘ghosts’, says National Trust Over the last century orchards and blossom trees have been slipping out of the British landscape at an alarming rate but the “ghosts” of lost flowers are glimpsed in an increasing number of placenames recalling the vanished pinks and whites, researchers have found. A National Trust study has discovered that the number of street, house and farm names relating to orchards and blossom has doubled across England and Wales since the turn of the 20th century, a period in which more than half of traditional orchards have disappeared. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Joanna Scanlan among actors backing gender equality push in theatre (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Women in Theatre Lab will act as incubator for playwriting and acting talent and address gender inequality Gemma Arterton, Joanna Scanlan and Stella Kanu are some of the figures backing an initiative to promote women in the theatre, who are being overlooked across the industry, according to the project’s founder. Women in Theatre Lab will primarily act as an incubator for playwriting and acting talent. Its founder, Jennifer Tuckett, said the group would also put pressure on Arts Council England (ACE) to launch a review of gender inequality across the arts. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Prince Harry confirms he is now a US resident (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Paperwork filed shows the royal has informed British authorities that he has moved and is now ‘usually resident’ in the United States Prince Harry, the Duke of Sussex, has formally confirmed he is now a US resident. The acknowledgment is said to underscore the prince’s increasing estrangement from Britain, after he and his wife Meghan, the Duchess of Sussex, walked away from royal duties four years ago. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

UK to delay start of health and safety checks on EU imports – report (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
New post-Brexit border checks ‘set to zero’ to avoid what Defra calls risk of serious disruption The UK government has reportedly told port health authorities it will not “turn on” health and safety checks for EU imports as new post-Brexit border controls begin this month. A presentation prepared by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) highlighted the risk of “significant disruption” if the new measures were implemented, according to the Financial Times. It made clear that the systems would not be fully ready on time. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Letting grass grow long boosts butterfly numbers, UK study proves (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Analysis of 60o gardens shows wilder lawns feed caterpillars and create breeding habitat Good news for lazy gardeners: one labour-saving tweak could almost double the number of butterflies in your garden, according to a new scientific study – let the grass grow long. In recent years nature lovers have been extolling the benefits of relaxed lawn maintenance with the growing popularity of the #NoMowMay campaign. Now an analysis of six years of butterfly sightings across 600 British gardens has provided the first scientific evidence that wilder lawns boost butterfly numbers. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

English primary schools cutting teacher numbers amid budget pressure, survey finds (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Rising inflation and falling pupil numbers also forcing schools to cut spending on extracurricular activities Primary schools across England are having to shed staff and cancel trips and activities this year as rising inflation and falling pupil numbers cause a rapid deterioration in their finances. A survey of more than 1,000 school leaders and teachers by the National Foundation for Educational Research found that three-quarters said their primary schools were cutting teaching assistant roles, while a third were also cutting teacher numbers. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

US accused of failing to act on reports of abuse by Israeli forces (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Panel urged denial of Israel funds because of serious human rights violations but state department has not yet acted, report says The US state department has failed to act on internal reports of human rights abuses by Israeli army and police units, according to a new report, raising new questions over whether Washington’s continued supply of arms to Israel is breaking US law. The ProPublica investigative journalism site quoted officials as saying that a special panel set up by the Biden administration had recommended that multiple Israeli military and police units be denied US funding because of serious human rights abuses. But the state department has yet to act on the recommendations. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Trump’s hush-money trial enters fourth day after difficult jury-selection process (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Prospective jurors were grilled on myriad facets of their life, with one raising concerns her identity had been discovered Donald Trump is set to appear in court for the fourth day of his hush-money trial on Friday after 12 jurors were selected on Thursday. The jury selection process had been complicated because of the polarizing and high-profile defendant. Prospective juror had been grilled on their political leanings, their social media posts and many other facets of their lives. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Finland says Russia ‘using illegal immigrants against us’ and calls for EU help – Europe live (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Prime minister Petteri Orpo says eastern Finland ‘suffering because of Russian behaviour’ Speaking of the instrumentalisation of migration by Russia, Ursula von der Leyen said “now Putin is focusing on Finland.” “Finland has acted decisively and successfully to counter this threat. This is not just about the security of Finland, but it is about the security of the European Union. We are in this together,” she said. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Kenya’s ‘blood desert’: can walking donor banks and drones help more patients survive? (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
The national blood deficit is most pressing in places like Turkana, where malaria, anaemia and violence make heavy demands on transfusion services – and doctors are pinning their hopes on innovation In his small cubicle in Lodwar County referral hospital in north-west Kenya, Edward Mutebi, the technician in charge of the hospital’s blood bank, greets a nurse from the maternity ward. “We want more blood,” the nurse says. “The previous allocation was not enough.” Mutebi dashes into an adjacent room and hands the nurse a pack of blood from a freezer, leaving the paperwork for later. Back at the maternity ward, it is a race against time as doctors try to stabilise a mother who has lost too much blood during delivery. Her haemoglobin level is dangerously low. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘Lost for words’: Joe Biden’s tale about cannibals bemuses Papua New Guinea residents (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
President’s suggestion that his ‘Uncle Bosie’ was eaten by cannibals harms US efforts to build Pacific ties, say local experts Joe Biden’s suggestion that his uncle may have been eaten by cannibals in Papua New Guinea during world war two has been met with a mixture of bemusement and criticism in the country. Biden spoke about his uncle, 2nd Lt Ambrose J Finnegan Jr, while campaigning in Pittsburgh on Wednesday, describing how “Uncle Bosie” had flown single engine planes as reconnaissance flights during the war. Biden said he “got shot down in New Guinea”, adding “they never found the body because there used to be a lot of cannibals, for real, in that part of New Guinea.” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Exclusive: Georgia lawmaker runs secret election-conspiracy Telegram channel (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Bridget Thorne, a Republican elected in Fulton county in 2022, has spread election fraud lies and accused county employees of crimes A Fulton county commissioner in Georgia has been operating a private Telegram channel for years, propagating debunked claims about the 2020 election, and spreading accusations of crimes by county employees, including Ruby Freeman, an election worker defamed by Rudy Giuliani in the wake of Donald Trump’s 2020 loss. Bridget Thorne, a Republican representing the relatively conservative cities of Fulton county north of Atlanta, indirectly identifies herself as the creator and administrator of the Fulton County Elections channel on Telegram, a mobile messaging platform, in multiple posts to its page. The channel uses the official logo of the Fulton county board of registration and elections. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Basque election: leftwing coalition partly descended from Eta leads in polls (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Surveys suggest EH Bildu’s focus on health, housing and employment is attracting younger voters A leftwing coalition of Basque separatists, partly descended from the political wing of the defunct terrorist group Eta, could become the largest party in the Basque Country’s parliament after an election in the northern Spanish region on Sunday. Latest polls suggest that EH Bildu, which is led by a convicted Eta member who later played a key role in persuading the group to end its armed campaign for an independent Basque homeland, has edged ahead of its rivals in the Basque Nationalist party (PNV). Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Meta steps up AI battle with OpenAI and Google with release of Llama 3 (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Tech firm released early versions of its latest large language model and a real-time image generator as it tries to catch up to OpenAI Meta Platforms on Thursday released early versions of its latest large language model, Llama 3, and an image generator that updates pictures in real time while users type prompts, as it races to catch up to generative AI market leader OpenAI. The models will be integrated into virtual assistant Meta AI, which the company is pitching as the most sophisticated of its free-to-use peers. The assistant will be given more prominent billing within Meta’s Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and Messenger apps as well as a new standalone website that positions it to compete more directly with Microsoft-backed OpenAI’s breakout hit ChatGPT. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sydney church stabbing: police charge 16-year-old boy with terrorism offence (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Bishop was injured in alleged attack in Wakeley with the teenager expected to appear at a bedside court hearing on Friday Follow our Australia news live blog for latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcast Police have charged a 16-year-old boy alleged to have stabbed a bishop and priest at a western Sydney church with a terrorism offence. The teenager was due to face a hospital bedside hearing of the Parramatta children’s court on Friday. He is still recovering from surgery after his finger was severed during the alleged attack on Monday night. Sign up for Guardian Australia’s free morning and afternoon email newsletters for your daily news roundup Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Nigerian woman rescued 10 years after kidnap by Boko Haram in Chibok (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Lydia Simon, recovered along with three children born in captivity, was one of 276 schoolgirls taken in 2014 Nigerian troops have rescued a pregnant woman and her three children 10 years after she was abducted by Boko Haram militants when she was a schoolgirl in the town of Chibok. Lydia Simon was rescued in Gwoza council area, about 95 miles (150km) east of Chibok, from where 276 schoolgirls were seized in April 2014. As many as 82 are still missing a decade after the high-profile mass kidnapping. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘Hidden in plain sight’: the European city tours of slavery and colonialism (Tue, 02 Apr 2024)
From Puerta del Sol plaza in Madrid to the Tuileries Garden in Paris, guides reshape stories continent tells about itself Dodging between throngs of tourists and workers on their lunch breaks in Madrid’s Puerta del Sol plaza, we stop in front of the nearly 3-tonne statue depicting King Carlos III on a horse. Playfully nicknamed Madrid’s best mayor, Carlos III is credited with modernising the city’s lighting, sewage systems and rubbish removal. Kwame Ondo, the tour guide behind AfroIbérica Tours, offers up another, albeit lesser-known tidbit about the monarch. “He was one of the biggest slave owners of his time,” says Ondo, citing the 1,500 enslaved people he kept on the Iberian peninsula and the 18,500 others held in Spain’s colonies in the Americas. As aristocratic families sought to keep up with the monarch, the proportion of enslaved people in Madrid swelled to an estimated 4% of the population in the 1780s. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Scraping away generations of forgetting: my fight to honour the Africans buried on St Helena (Wed, 27 Mar 2024)
A braid from a formerly enslaved African buried on the island was the catalyst for Annina van Neel’s work to preserve and share these histories St Helena urged to return remains of 325 formerly enslaved people to Africa Buried: how we choose to remember the transatlantic slave trade – documentary At the end of January 2012, I arrived on St Helena after a six-day journey by ship from Cape Town. After being surrounded by water for nearly a week, the sight of land on the midnight-blue horizon was overwhelming. It was as though someone had forgotten their piece of land in the middle of the South Atlantic Ocean. 47 square miles of volcanic rock, 2,810 miles from the coast of Brazil and 1,610 miles from Angola – an oasis in a desert, an enigma. I arrived on the island as part of the project team constructing St Helena’s first airport. Previously accessible only by sea, this incredible community, which had been defined by its isolation as an outpost and a place of exile for 500 years, would for the first time be easily reached by the rest of the world. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

St Helena urged to return remains of 325 formerly enslaved people to Africa (Wed, 27 Mar 2024)
British overseas territory may face legal action over alleged failure to honour reburial plan after remains found during airport project Scraping away generations of forgetting: my fight to honour the Africans buried on St Helena A British overseas territory is being urged to return the remains of 325 formerly enslaved people to their ancestral kingdoms in Africa, or potentially face legal action. The remains were excavated in 2008 when an access road to a new airport was being built on the remote South Atlantic Ocean island of St Helena. They were held in storage for 14 years before being reburied. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sites of resistance: threatened African burial grounds around the world (Thu, 28 Mar 2024)
Too often cemeteries for enslaved people have been all but erased from history but how we remember matters Buried: remembering the transatlantic slave trade For archeologists, what defines people as human is how we bury our dead. Imagine, then, a society that relegates a whole community as legally inhuman, enslaved with no rights. In spite of slavery, African burial grounds are tangible reminders of the enslaved and free – defying oppressive circumstances by reclaiming people’s humanity through acts of remembrance. When I first visited the British overseas territory of St Helena in 2018 and saw the burial ground in Rupert’s Valley, I was astounded by its size and significance. It unambiguously placed the island at the centre of the Middle Passage – tying the British empire to the institution of slavery in the US, the Caribbean, and globally. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

TV tonight: catching the fugitive rapist who faked his own death (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Myles Bonnar investigates the wild story of a California busker who fled Scotland. Plus: how Gaza divides American campuses. Here’s what to watch this evening Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Funny Pages to Phil Spector: the seven best films to watch on TV this week (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Owen Kline’s coming-of-age tale is very funny and endlessly excruciating, and Al Pacino plays the music producer on trial for murder with relish Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Lord Spikeheart: The Adept review – Duma star’s relentless metal isn’t for the fainthearted (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
(Haekalu) With doom-laden growls and falsetto screams, the Kenyan metaller’s indefatigable vocals cut through a thunderous onslaught of headbanging sound Over the past decade vocalist Martin Kanja, AKA Lord Spikeheart, has become a figurehead of the burgeoning Kenyan metal scene: first with frenetic speedcore group Lust of a Dying Breed, then to international acclaim as part of industrial duo Duma, cultivating a distinctive blend of guttural yawps, screeching screams and gravelly rap verses that seep menacingly through headbanging instrumentals. The Adept is his debut solo album. Across 13 tracks barely lasting three minutes apiece, Kanja displays the breadth and depth of his vocal experience, acrobatically veering from doom-laden growls to falsetto screams, fast-paced verses and textural noise, his voice a penetrating instrument that can compete with the distorted guitars and thundering bass. It is a condensed and relentless listening experience, launching with the scattergun fuzz of warped kick drums and Kanja’s alternating screams of “yeah” and “go” on opener TYVM before speeding through the industrial techno of Rem Fodder, death-metal percussion on Acts of God and swaggering trap rhythms of Emblem Blem. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Dead Boy Detectives to Secrets of the Octopus: the seven best shows to stream this week (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Teenagers who solve paranormal mysteries from beyond the grave – yes really – and a beautiful and psychedelic show about our fascinating deep-sea friends Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Bald by Stuart Heritage review – hair today, gone tomorrow (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
An unexpected twist on the grief memoir sees the Guardian writer chart the five stages of male-pattern baldness It takes Stuart Heritage almost 30 pages to summon the courage to write about his comb-over days. There are hints of it on the way as he describes the slow-motion crisis of confidence that tracks his receding hairline. He applies the Kübler-Ross model of grief to his loss: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. The comb-over, he says, is part of the bargaining phase, when perceptions of reality can become tragically skewed. When the remnants of his once generous mop do flop into view, Heritage, the author and longtime Guardian contributor, does what he does best: he lays on the laughs. Men who resort to comb-overs resist the cold clippers of acceptance because any hair can feel better than none, “even if what they’ve got looks like five long strands draped across their head like spaghetti on a beach ball”. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Rebel Moon – Part Two: The Scargiver review – Zack Snyder’s bombastically fun sequel (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
The divisive director’s sci-fi follow-up is both original and derivative and will be unlikely to convert anyone, but there’s something charming about its sincerity Is there a contemporary Hollywood film-maker who better epitomizes the modern commerce-v-art quagmire than Zack Snyder? Snyder has an instantly recognizable style and a deathless dedication to his singular vision; he also, at the behest of various studios, volunteers to think almost entirely in terms of franchises, comic books and self-conscious myth-making – whether he’s trying to interrogate those myths or just build them up so he can smash them down with maximum mayhem. Rebel Moon, his sci-fi/fantasy franchise for Netflix, pulls both sides of his career to further extremes. It’s a multimillion-dollar two-parter (for now) that’s technically original and highly derivative, with Snyder’s fanboy obsessions taken so far around the bend that they become niche again. Even his hordes of online fans don’t seem to care that much about it. Rebel Moon – Part 2: The Scargiver, following last year’s A Child of Fire kickoff, is supposed to be an explosive finale. But with expanded R-rated cuts of both movies definitely on the way, and ideas rattling around in Snyder’s brain for even more sequels, the whole project feels like one long, never-ending middle. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘I feel ahead of the game’: how a Brit School student landed the opportunity of a lifetime (Thu, 29 Feb 2024)
Making it to the final stage of a creative challenge that gives finalists a chance to be seen at the Brit Awards offered young musician Milo Claes access to industry specialists – as well as invaluable exposure as an artist Milo Claes is a student at the Brit School whose work has been chosen to appear on TV on 2 March as part of Mastercard’s sponsorship of the Brit Awards. It’s the opportunity of a lifetime for the young musician, but his achievement is all the more impressive when you consider that he left his entry to the last minute. Ahead of this year’s awards, Mastercard challenged students from the Brit School to use their skills to create an original interpretation of Mastercard’s “sonic logo”, which is the audible translation of a brand into a sound. One hundred and eighty students were invited to respond and 14 – including Claes – made it to the final stage, securing the opportunity to have their work featured in Mastercard’s sponsorship campaign. The students will also get to work with industry professionals in their area of interest, giving them rare and real insight into their chosen careers. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘They made my vision real’: how renowned creatives brought a student’s work to life for the Brit Awards (Thu, 29 Feb 2024)
Arts student Willow Sawyer has always wanted to be a special effects makeup artist, and now her dreams are more achievable than ever after collaborating with successful artists on a project that will be showcased at the Brit Awards Willow Sawyer’s ambition is to be a special effects makeup artist, transforming people’s faces and bodies to bring fantastical stories to life. So for the 17-year-old Brit School student, the chance to meet Raphael Arcadios, whose innovative work with costumes, body art and makeup has been featured on catwalks and in magazines such as the Face and Vogue, was a dream come true. “It was amazing to meet them,” says Sawyer. “Being able to talk to them, ask them questions and hear their advice was so inspiring. It made me even more excited about pursuing my ambitions.” Sawyer is in her third year at the Brit School studying production arts, encompassing everything from set and costume design to lighting and sound. She won the opportunity to meet Arcadios after participating in a recent Mastercard creative challenge, along with 180 other students. Mastercard, which has been the headline sponsor of the Brit Awards for 26 years, also partners with the Brit School to champion the next generation of creative talent. For the challenge, the students were given the task of reimagining the Mastercard sonic, a “logo” in the form of a unique, six-note piano melody, which plays at the end of the company’s adverts, in any art form of their choice. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘It feels like the start of my career’: how a student musician got to showcase his work at the Brit Awards (Thu, 29 Feb 2024)
After submitting his music on a whim to the Mastercard creative challenge, Emeka Onyema-Mathews has become one of 14 talented emerging artists to showcase his work at the prestigious ceremony “I can’t wait to actually be at the Brits,” says 18-year-old Emeka Onyema-Mathews, who will be in the audience of the 2024 awards, thanks to being one of the winners of a creative challenge tied to the ceremony. “I’ve never been before,” he says. “I came close a couple of years ago when I was in year 11. My eldest brother had a ticket and me and my other brother just came along, but we didn’t go in. I remember just looking from the outside and thinking: ‘I want to be here.’” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘I felt like a movie star’: how showcasing my work at the Brit Awards helped boost my fledgling career (Thu, 29 Feb 2024)
Entering a creative challenge set by headline sponsor Mastercard helped build design student Mahari-Rae Ogilvie’s confidence and supercharged her ambitions for the future Mahari-Rae Ogilvie has always had a passion for the visual arts. From primary school, when her classmates would ask her to do bubble writing for them, through to secondary school, where she excelled in graphic design, Ogilvie always knew she wanted to carve out a creative career. And now, at just 17, she is enjoying her first taste of professional success thanks to the Mastercard creative challenge. “My mum can’t stop talking about it,” says Ogilvie. “Sometimes it’s hard to explain what we do on my course, but now my family gets it and they think it’s amazing.” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘A water world teeming with wildlife’: readers’ favourite national parks in Europe (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
From camping beside glacial lakes in Montenegro to birdwatching in Poland, the continent has no shortage of inspiring wilderness adventures One of the most incredible bird scenes in Europe took place as I hiked through the Bielawa nature reserve in northern Poland, about 40 miles north of Gdansk. I had left the village of Sławoszyno via a dirt track and was heading towards Kłanino, the open countryside and fields disappearing from my sight as the hedgerows grew taller either side of me. As I stepped forward, a gap appeared in the hedge and in front of my eyes a flock of nearly 100 cranes, which had been silent, took off across the field, honking with their red-tinged heads and faces, and feathery wing feathers flapping. I could almost touch them. The 19,000-hectare (47,000-acre) park is a mix of forest, wetland and coast. Rita Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘When I wear this shirt, I feel part of a tribe’: how running club merch became a marker of cool (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Casual running clubs that give members the chance to exercise and socialise are popping up all over the UK. And each one is developing a style of its own At just before 9am on a bright April morning in Greenwich, south-east London, runners gather in the shadow of the Cutty Sark. There are just a few at first, then more and more until the group numbers around 40. It’s a little awkward (for a first-timer like me, at least) as we shiver and make small talk. But soon we coalesce to form a big circle and run through a warm-up before doing a gentle 5km around Blackheath – we’ll be installed in a local cafe by 10am. A version of this scene can be found up and down the country every weekend. Running seems to be more popular than ever – almost 580,000 people applied for this weekend’s London Marathon, an increase of 120,000 on the year before – but recently there has been a boom in casual, community-focused running clubs that organise regular turn-up-and-run events for people looking to supplement their training, meet new friends, or simply get out of the house. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

How we met: ‘It felt like chatting with an old friend rather than meeting for the first time’ (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Steve, 65, and Lisa, 67, met in the mid-90s on an early online messaging system while on opposite sides of the Atlantic. They now live together near Cambridge Tell us your story of how you met someone special When Steve was introduced to an early online messaging system called Internet Relay Chat in 1994, he was excited to meet like-minded people. “I was living in Essex and working for a telecommunications company, so unlike many I had access to the internet and computers,” he says. “I joined an early online group for Kate Bush fans and we splintered off into another group for fans of a New York singer called Happy Rhodes.” He says the communication tool was “very slow” by today’s standards. “It showed every letter someone typed,” he laughs. In the US, in Connecticut, Lisa was introduced to the same messaging program by one of her friends. “I was doing a neurobiology PhD at the time,” she says. “I was living alone and working in a lab by myself a lot. She gave me a disc which meant I could talk to people all over the world, so I had to try it out.” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

What to wear now you can’t wear Sambas (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Rishi Sunak has killed them off, at least for now. So while your Sambas take a breather and wait for the storm to pass, here are some other looks led by trainers not yet tainted by having cropped up in the halls of government Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

My close friend is a therapist but all she does is complain. Should I exit this relationship? | Leading questions (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
There may be ways to protect yourself from her negativity without jettisoning the relationship, writes advice columnist Eleanor Gordon-Smith. Start by creating boundaries Get our weekend culture and lifestyle email I have a close friend of 15 years. When I met her, she was fun-loving and positive, but in the last few years she has gradually got more negative. We live in different countries and speak regularly, and every time I talk to her all she does is complain about her life and paint herself as the victim. She is a fellow therapist and I have encouraged her to get support to work through the patterns she is in, but she never does. It gets to the point where I get fed up with the moaning and frustrated that she isn’t taking responsibility for her life. When this happens, I usually point out that nothing will change until she does. She responds by lashing out at me angrily, becoming defensive and giving me the silent treatment. This has recently happened again and I am tired of it. It has occurred at a time that I am going through some difficulties. I have told her that I do not deserve to be treated like this and asked for an apology. I am very hurt that she hasn’t apologised and her latest message put it all back on me. I also recognise that I need to accept she doesn’t want help, but I find it very difficult to have a person like this in my life now. Part of me wants to use this latest rupture as an exit strategy. Should I? Sign up for the fun stuff with our rundown of must-reads, pop culture and tips for the weekend, every Saturday morning Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Do you have an ‘emotionally immature parent’? How a nine-year-old book found a new, younger audience (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Therapist Lindsay Gibson’s 2015 book has sold over a million copies and its message has soared on social media. What does it mean? In an ideal world, adults would be more mature than their kids. They would be better at handling stress, resolving conflicts with others, or talking about their feelings. In the opening chapter of the book Adult Children of Emotionally Immature Parents, therapist Lindsay Gibson presents an unsettling alternative. “What if,” she wrote, “some sensitive children come into the world and within a few years are more emotionally mature than their parents, who have been around for decades?” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Tell us your experience of prayer at school (Wed, 17 Apr 2024)
We would like to hear from Muslims in the UK about theirs or their children’s experiences of prayer at school A Muslim pupil has lost their high court appeal against Michaela community school in Brent, north-west London, over its ban on prayer rituals. The pupil had claimed the ban was discriminatory and breached her right to religious freedom. We would like to hear from Muslims in the UK about their experiences of prayer when they were at school. We’re particularly interested in hearing from Muslims aged 18 or over who were able to pray at school in the UK and parents who are comfortable with sharing their children’s experiences. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Carers in the UK: have you been threatened with prosecution for benefit fraud? (Mon, 08 Apr 2024)
We’d like to hear from carers in the UK who have been investigated for alleged benefit fraud by the DWP Tens of thousands of unpaid carers looking after disabled, frail or ill relatives are being forced to repay huge sums to the government and threatened with criminal prosecution after unwittingly breaching earnings rules by just a few pounds a week. People who claim the £81.90-a-week carer’s allowance for looking after loved ones while working part-time are being forced by the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) to pay back money that has been erroneously overpaid to them, in some cases running to more than £20,000, or risk going to prison. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Young people in the UK: how do you feel about voting? (Tue, 16 Apr 2024)
We’d like to hear how people under 30 in Britain feel about voting in political elections, and whether they are planning to go to the polls this year We’re interested to hear from young people in the UK about how they feel about voting. If you are under 30 and live in the UK, tell us whether you’re planning to vote in upcoming political elections, and if not why not. Are you registered to vote? Do you believe your vote can make a difference? Have you voted in the past or are you a potential first time voter? Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

People in the UK: how do you feel about a ban on smoking? (Wed, 17 Apr 2024)
We would like to know your thoughts on the anti-smoking bill and how it might affect you or your children The House of Commons voted by 383 to 67 in favour of a plan to make it illegal for anyone turning 15 from 2024, or younger, to buy tobacco products in the UK. It does not ban smoking outright but anyone born after 1 January 2009 would not be able to buy cigarettes, with the legal age rising every year, effectively creating a ban on smoking for future generations. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

A silent Trump glowers and stares during third day of criminal trial (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
This was not Donald Trump the business mogul or Donald Trump the 45th president – it was Donald Trump the defendant With Donald Trump just a few feet away, a potential juror in the criminal case against him summed up the experience in just three words. “This is bizarre,” she said, with just a slight hint of a seasoned New York accent. Bizarre it was. There was a potential juror who once spent the night at one of Trump’s lawyers’ homes more than a decade ago (Trump’s team used one of its peremptory strikes to remove the juror). The microphones didn’t work. The proceedings had to start over when Judge Juan Merchan realized that a court reporter hadn’t been present first thing. And the temperature in the courthouse was so frigid that Todd Blanche, one of Trump’s lawyers, asked Merchan if it would be possible to turn up the temperature “just one degree”. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

She was fired after not endorsing Splenda-filled salads to people with diabetes. Why? | Neil Barsky (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Elizabeth Hanna says she was fired by the American Diabetes Association after refusing to approve recipes heaped with the additive made by a major donor Elizabeth Hanna had a simple job: help people with diabetes figure out what to eat. Anyone with common sense knows this should probably not entail foods that might increase people’s risk of getting diabetes. But that’s not necessarily the thinking at the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the world’s leading diabetes research and patient advocacy group, which also receives millions of dollars from sponsors in the pharmaceutical, food and agricultural industries. According to a lawsuit Hanna recently filed against the ADA, the organization – which endorses recipes and food plans on its website and on the websites of “partner” food brands – tried to get her to greenlight recipes that she believed flew in the face of the ADA’s mission. These included recipes like a “cucumber and onion salad” made with a third of a cup of Splenda granulated artificial sweetener, “autumnal sheet-pan veggies” with a quarter cup of Splenda monk fruit sweetener and a “cranberry almond spinach salad” with a quarter cup of Splenda monkfruit sweetener. Neil Barsky, a former Wall Street Journal reporter and investment manager, is the founder of The Marshall Project Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘People are begging us to feed their children’: Gaza refugees in Cairo find little help (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
With no centralised relief effort in Egypt, Palestinians are relying on grassroots charities for food, rent and clothing The last thing Rania sold was her jewellery. In the weeks after her family first woke up to heavy shelling in northern Gaza, they lost everything as they journeyed south to escape the bombs. “Wherever we went, the houses would be destroyed,” she says. “We were sent running from place to place.” After three long months, she found herself in the border city of Rafah parting with her rings, gold bracelets and necklaces to pay the $15,000 “coordination fees” needed to get her family on the evacuation list to leave Gaza. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sydney stabbing attacks: what security experts say to do in life-threatening situations (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
As Australia reels from attacks at Westfield Bondi Junction and a Wakeley church, security experts give advice on how people can best respond Follow our Australia news live blog for latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcast Australians are in shock after two separate stabbing attacks in Sydney that occurred within days of each other. A stabbing at a western Sydney church on Monday night has been deemed a terror attack. In a separate attack on Saturday at Westfield Bondi Junction, Joel Cauchi allegedly fatally stabbed six people before he was shot dead by police Sign up for Guardian Australia’s free morning and afternoon email newsletters for your daily news roundup Luca Ittimani contributed reporting. In Australia, support is available at Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636, Lifeline on 13 11 14, and at MensLine on 1300 789 978. In the UK, the charity Mind is available on 0300 123 3393 and Childline on 0800 1111. In the US, call or text Mental Health America at 988 or chat 988lifeline.org. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Love nest: how a musk lorikeet fell for a red-tailed black cockatoo (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Two parrots have formed a unique relationship after arriving at a Tasmanian wildlife sanctuary Follow our Australia news live blog for latest updates Get our morning and afternoon news emails, free app or daily news podcast After struggling to bond with members of their own flock, a matte black cockatoo and bright green lorikeet have become unexpected friends. Greg Iron, director of Bonorong wildlife sanctuary in Tasmania, described their relationship as being “love at first sight” for Raphael, a musk lorikeet who was previously kept without a permit. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘We can’t hunt or fish’: the villages in Ecuador’s Amazon surrounded by abandoned explosives (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
In 2002, high explosives were laid in oil wells across 20 sq km of forest. The firm has gone but the pentolite remains, despite a court ruling, putting lives and the ecosystem at risk Living on the banks of the Bobonaza River, in the Ecuadorian Amazon, the Indigenous communities in Sarayaku have always lived in harmony with nature. The rainforest, says Patricia Gualinga, is a sacred, conscious being. So when an Argentinian company was allowed to place a huge amount of high explosive around the rainforest to prospect for oil, the local Kichwa people fought back and eventually took their case to an international court. More than a decade after winning their legal battle, however, the explosives remain strewn around the community’s territory. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Fontaines DC: ‘We can generate ideas that sound like they’ve been carved in stone for a thousand years’ (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Influenced by Korn and moving beyond their native Ireland, the band are ready to be one of the biggest in the world. They explain how panic attacks and parenthood came to bear on a bold new LP Carlos O’Connell isn’t merely excited about the release of Fontaines DC’s new single. He’s “giddy for it. I’m giddy,” he emphasises, reclining in his dressing gown in a sunlit corner of his north London home. His attire is far from rock star loucheness: it’s 9am and the guitarist has already been up for hours with his one-year-old daughter. “There’s no time to get ready!” His effusiveness doesn’t feel like a stretch: the prospect of any new material from the celebrated Dublin band is thrilling enough; the fact that Starburster marks a wholly unexpected sidestep into antic, irreverent, Korn-inspired nu-metal is enough to make any interested parties come over slightly light-headed. Yet later that afternoon, Fontaines frontman Grian Chatten is finding it difficult to muster the same enthusiasm. Perhaps because he can’t quite bring himself to listen to the thing – or, in fact, any of the band’s forthcoming fourth album, Romance. He tells me this from a more stereotypical hot seat, a characterfully cluttered old-school pub in Camden Town, although he’s not cleaving to rock cliche, either. We are on the Diet Cokes and the only pharmaceuticals around are his ADHD medication, which he remembers to take halfway through the interview. “Want one?” he offers, snapping the blister pack. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Trussonomic lessons: what can be learned from former PM’s book? (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
The anti-growth coalition, Bank of England and the OBR are among those under fire from Liz Truss Raw free-market economics is missing in action. Somewhere between its 1980s ascendancy and today, the media, politicians, civil service and even the corporate mainstream abandoned small government and low taxes. At the heart of Liz Truss’s new book, Ten Years to Save the West, the former prime minister reckons this is the reason for Britain’s economic drift, alongside “unelected technocrats” overruling the “wishes of the people”. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

From low-level drug dealer to human trafficker: are modern slavery laws catching the wrong people? (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
When I heard that a boy from my primary school had been convicted of trafficking, I had to find out what had happened to make him fall so far When armed police burst through his front door in Tottenham, north London, at 5am in September 2014, Glodi Wabelua knew things looked bad. The house was full of drug paraphernalia, including a hydraulic press, scales and mixing bowls, as well as a mobile phone full of incriminating texts advertising deals for crack cocaine and heroin. The case went to trial in February 2016, and Wabelua’s two co-defendants – who, like him, were aged 20 – received 10- and 11-year sentences. Wabelua, who had lodged an early guilty plea a year before, was handed six years for dealing class A drugs. He was not new to the criminal justice system, having already served three years for drug offences in his teens. But soon he would be charged with an even more serious crime. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Football coaching boosts wellbeing of troubled pupils, study finds (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Charity that uses football to help pupils build relationships found to improve happiness in Greater Manchester project Intensive mentoring for troubled schoolchildren using football kickabouts can significantly enhance wellbeing, increasing happiness equivalent to an unemployed adult getting a job, a study has found. A project involving more than 2,000 pupils in dozens of secondary schools in Greater Manchester showed that instead of wellbeing declining among pupils at risk of exclusion who had behavioural issues and special educational needs, their happiness scores increased. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Why Prague's homeless are resorting to poverty tourism – video (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Homelessness is on the rise globally, and the Czech Republic has the highest rate in central and eastern Europe. The Guardian visited Prague, for a long time a popular destination for tourists, to see how even this sector caters for the city’s visitors - and to meet the range of people aiming to tackle the causes of homelessness in all its forms. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Flash flooding in Oman and UAE hit by heaviest rainfall in 75 years – video (Wed, 17 Apr 2024)
Oman endured flash flooding with authorities reporting fatalities before the United Arab Emirates was hit by what the government described as the largest amount of rainfall in the past 75 years. The rains began on Monday night, and by Tuesday evening the desert city of Dubai had received the average amount of rainfall it normally gets for the whole year Desert city of Dubai floods as UAE hit by heaviest rainfall in 75 years Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Footage shows people in Gaza fleeing strikes as people try to return to the north – video (Tue, 16 Apr 2024)
Video shared across social media shows alleged IDF strikes and sniper fire targeting groups of people attempting to travel to the north of Gaza, which Israel says is an active 'war zone'. The northern half of the coastal enclave has been sealed off by the Israeli military, but rumours spread over the weekend of civilians passing through, triggering a wave of people trying to return to their homes Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Paintings rescued after fire breaks out at Copenhagen's old stock exchange – video (Tue, 16 Apr 2024)
Dramatic footage shows artworks being removed from Copenhagen's 17th-century former stock exchange after the landmark building was engulfed in flames. Plumes of black smoke were seen rising from the Dutch Renaissance-style building, which was undergoing renovation and clad in scaffolding. People were seen rushing in and out of the building carrying paintings to safety, and Danish media reported an annexe of the parliament and several ministries nearby, including the finance ministry, had been evacuated Spire collapses after fire breaks out at Copenhagen’s old stock exchange Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'It felt like something surreal': Wakeley community on Sydney church stabbing – video (Tue, 16 Apr 2024)
Australian police conducted investigations outside the Assyrian Christ the Good Shepherd church, a day after an alleged knife attack at the site that has been declared a terrorist act. At least four people were wounded in the incident, including Bishop Mar Mari Emmanuel, who was allegedly stabbed at the altar of his own church. A live stream of the service on the church’s website showed a person approaching the altar who then appeared to stab toward the bishop's head multiple times. Crowds gathered outside the church after the incident and were moved on after police officers were attacked ► Subscribe to Guardian Australia on YouTube Sydney church stabbing: police treating the alleged stabbing of bishop as terrorist attack Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Aerial video shows mass coral bleaching on Great Barrier Reef amid global heat stress event – video (Tue, 16 Apr 2024)
Scientists have recorded widespread bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef as global heating creates a fourth planet-wide bleaching event. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Watch, 54% of ocean waters containing coral reefs have been experiencing heat stress high enough to cause bleaching ► Subscribe to Guardian Australia on YouTube Global heating pushes coral reefs towards worst planet-wide mass bleaching on record Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Our lives in the UK asylum system: 'the power of fear' – video (Thu, 28 Mar 2024)
The Guardian has been working with a group of community reporters in Rochdale and Oldham who wanted to highlight the realities for women in the asylum system across Greater Manchester. Supported by the Elephants Trail, the group met women stuck in the asylum backlog, women traumatised by detention and women struggling to find housing. They were all volunteering in their communities, while reckoning with a hostile climate towards refugees and asylum seekers. This film is part of a collaborative video series called Made in Britain Britain's broken welfare system is leaving our community on the brink Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

A historic revolt, a forgotten hero, an empty plinth: is there a right way to remember slavery? – podcast (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
As the author of a book about a pivotal uprising in 18th-century Jamaica, Vincent Brown was enlisted in a campaign to make its leader a national hero. But when he arrived in Jamaica, he started to wonder what he had got himself into Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

The chilling policy to cut Greenland’s high birth rate – podcast (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
In the 1960s the birthrate in Greenland was one of the highest in the world. Then it plunged. Decades later, women have finally begun speaking out about what happened Bula Larson was 14 when one day she and her friends were told to go to the hospital. Bula lived in Greenland and was Inuit like most of the population of the island, which is an autonomous territory of Denmark. At the hospital she and her friends lined up, and one-by-one were told to enter a room. Bula recalls how she was asked to sit on a bed with ‘cold metal stirrups’ where, to her shock, she was fitted with an IUD, a contraceptive coil she had never asked for or agreed to have. Today, more than 100 women are suing the Danish government for a policy of forced contraception. Helen Pidd hears how thousands of Inuit women and girls – some aged just 13 – were fitted with coils. Many say this was done without their or their parents’ consent, and caused lasting damage. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Manchester City and Arsenal crash out of Champions League – Football Weekly Extra (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Nicky Bandini, Lars Sivertsen and Sid Lowe as Real Madrid and Bayern account for Manchester City and Arsenal in the Champions League quarter-finals Rate, review, share on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud, Acast and Stitcher, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email. On the podcast today: you can never write off Real Madrid. Manchester City dominated them for almost the entire 120 minutes, but they stayed in it and ultimately went through on penalties to exorcise the demons from their collapse at the Etihad last year. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Who really wins if the Enhanced Games go ahead? – podcast (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
Billed as a rival to the Olympic Games, the Enhanced Games, set to take place in 2025, is a sporting event with a difference; athletes will be allowed to dope. Ian Sample talks to chief sports writer Barney Ronay about where the idea came from and how it’s being sold as an anti-establishment underdog, and to Dr Peter Angell about what these usually banned substances are, and what they could do to athletes’ bodies Clips: Talk TV, News Nation, Inside with Brett Hawke, ESPN Read Barney Ronay’s opinion piece on the Enhanced Games Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Can Rishi Sunak create a smoke-free generation? - podcast (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
MPs voted this week to ban anyone aged 15 or younger in 2024 from ever buying cigarettes. If the legislation passes and is enacted, it would be a world first. Ben Quinn reports Before 2007, going out on the town in the UK involved inhaling secondhand smoke – on trains, in restaurants, in clubs and in pubs. Even non-smokers would find that a stale tobacco scent could linger after an evening out. The ban on smoking indoors in public places changed things almost overnight. Now with smoking rates among the population plummeting, the government is going a step further: it intends to ban the sale of tobacco to anyone born after 2009. To that age cohort onwards, the sale of cigarettes would be prohibited. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

PSG and Dortmund thrill in two classic Champions League quarter-finals – Football Weekly (Wed, 17 Apr 2024)
Max Rushden is joined by Barry Glendenning, Jonathan Fadugba and Archie Rhind-Tutt as Borussia Dortmund and PSG book their places in the Champions League last four Rate, review, share on Apple Podcasts, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud, Acast and Stitcher, and join the conversation on Facebook, Twitter and email. On the podcast today; Barcelona were 4-2 up on aggregate at home and a Ronald Araujo red card changed the game. What can we make of a worryingly competent and almost likeable PSG side? Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

From the archive: Did Brazil’s evangelical superstar have her husband killed? – podcast (Wed, 17 Apr 2024)
We are raiding the Guardian Long Read archives to bring you some classic pieces from years past, with new introductions from the authors. This week, from 2021: Flordelis grew up in a Rio favela, but rose to fame after adopting more than 50 children, becoming a hugely successful gospel singer and winning a seat in congress. And now she is on trial for murder. By Tom Phillips Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sign up for the Fashion Statement newsletter: our free fashion email (Tue, 20 Sep 2022)
Style, with substance: what’s really trending this week, a roundup of the best fashion journalism and your wardrobe dilemmas solved, direct to your inbox every Thursday Style, with substance: what’s really trending this week, a roundup of the best fashion journalism and your wardrobe dilemmas solved, delivered straight to your inbox every Thursday Explore all our newsletters: whether you love film, football, fashion or food, we’ve got something for you Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sign up for the Guardian Documentaries newsletter: our free short film email (Fri, 02 Sep 2016)
Be the first to see our latest thought-provoking films, bringing you bold and original storytelling from around the world Discover the stories behind our latest short films, learn more about our international film-makers, and join us for exclusive documentary events. We’ll also share a selection of our favourite films, from our archives and from further afield, for you to enjoy. Sign up below. Can’t wait for the next newsletter? Start exploring our archive now. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Guardian Traveller newsletter: Sign up for our free holidays email (Wed, 12 Oct 2022)
From biking adventures to city breaks, get inspiration for your next break – whether in the UK or further afield – with twice-weekly emails from the Guardian’s travel editors. You’ll also receive handpicked offers from Guardian Holidays. From biking adventures to city breaks, get inspiration for your next break – whether in the UK or further afield – with twice-weekly emails from the Guardian’s travel editors. You’ll also receive handpicked offers from Guardian Holidays. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sign up for the Feast newsletter: our free Guardian food email (Tue, 09 Jul 2019)
A weekly email from Yotam Ottolenghi, Meera Sodha, Felicity Cloake and Rachel Roddy, featuring the latest recipes and seasonal eating ideas Each week we’ll send you an exclusive newsletter from our star food writers. We’ll also send you the latest recipes from Yotam Ottolenghi, Nigel Slater, Meera Sodha and all our star cooks, stand-out food features and seasonal eating inspiration, plus restaurant reviews from Grace Dent and Jay Rayner. Sign up below to start receiving the best of our culinary journalism in one mouth-watering weekly email. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Week in wildlife – in pictures: a hungry jackal, a cat with webbed feet and a cheeky badger (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
The best of this week’s wildlife photographs from around the world Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Nuclear fields and insect feasts: The Sony World Photography awards – in pictures (Fri, 19 Apr 2024)
Intricate spider’s webs, hornless rhinos and the world of Bavarian finger wrestling all feature in this year’s exhibition of mind-blowing photography Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Record-breaking ballet dancers and protesting farmers : photos of the day – Thursday (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
The Guardian’s picture editors select some of the most powerful photos from around the world Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

World Press Photo 2024 – global winners (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
The global winners in the World Press Photo annual competition have been announced, with Mohammed Salem winning world press photo of the year. The winners were selected from 24 regional winners and there were also six honourable mentions and two special mentions this year. Awarded stories will be part of a global exhibition visiting London in May ‘These final selected works are a tapestry of our world today, centred on images we believe were made with respect and integrity, that can speak universally and resonate far beyond their origins,’ said Fiona Shields, global jury chair and head of photography at the Guardian. ‘This is an opportunity to applaud the work of press and documentary photographers everywhere and to amplify the importance of the stories they are telling, often in unimaginable circumstances’ Warning: viewers may find some of the following photographs distressing Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Party with an 8ft pink panther! Ibiza in the 70s and 80s – in pictures (Thu, 18 Apr 2024)
The Spanish photographer Oriol Maspons is known for his reportage, portraiture, fashion and advertising work in the 1950s and 60s. But from the late 1960s to the late 1980s he would holiday in Ibiza, where he took pictures for pleasure. His humorous and playful photographs of the island’s beachgoers and clubbers disclose the new attitudes to nudity, sexuality and freedom of expression in the post-Franco era Oriol Maspons’s Ibiza is published by IDEA Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Desert floods and northern lights: photos of the day – Wednesday (Wed, 17 Apr 2024)
The Guardian’s picture editors select some of the most powerful photos from around the world Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite