http://www.guardian.co.uk/

The Guardian

Brexit: Juncker and Tusk say withdrawal agreement not up for renegotiation – Politics live (ven., 14 déc. 2018)
EU leaders praise May and stress respect with which they treat her after PM insists earlier EU27 determined to work speedily on future relationship EU leaders reject May’s Brexit proposal Labour to ‘throw kitchen sink’ to force PM’s hand 4.46pm GMT Irish Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar, has told journalists that May suggested that legal assurances could be given around the start date for a future relationship or trade deal – something he rejected. There were suggestions, some of them perhaps made sense, others would be difficult. One is that we would commit to a particular date to have the future relationship treaty, the trade deal. We can commit to our best endeavours and say we will work towards a target date. It is not possible to say that we will definitely meet that date. The future relationship treaty will be more complicated, it will have to be ratified by 28 member parliaments.” For us to make a legal commitment to have a done deal at a particular moment or time, that is not possible because it is not in our gift to deliver that, we cannot promise anything that is not in our power to deliver. 4.35pm GMT Here is a quick summary of the press conference with Juncker, Tusk and Kurz. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

How No 10 tried, and failed, to contrive EU rescue of May's deal (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
It was a case of two carefully planned steps forward, three steps back for the Brexit deal When Olly Robbins, the prime minister’s Brexit point-man, was spotted arriving at Brussels-Midi train station shortly after Theresa May had postponed the “meaningful vote”, British officials were quick to insist it was a routine meeting. In reality, the Downing Street aide was in town for the start of secret, intensive talks with two of the EU’s most senior officials, Piotr Serafin from Donald Tusk’s European council, and Martin Selmayr, the secretary general of the European commission, in an attempt to stage-manage an EU rescue of the prime minister’s Brexit deal. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Isis withdraws from last urban stronghold in Syria (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Syrian Democratic Forces capture Hajin in Deir ez-Zor province after heavy fighting Islamic State extremists have withdrawn from their last urban stronghold in Syria after weeks of intensifying clashes with Kurdish-led fighters that have splintered the remnants of the group’s leadership and raised fresh questions about the fate of its founder, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. Isis forces retreated to villages to the east of Hajin in the early hours of Thursday after several days of US airstrikes, which allowed Kurdish proxy forces to sweep into the town on the eastern bank of the Euphrates River. Clashes continued throughout the day, and western observers cautioned that the militants may be attempting to regroup for a counter-assault. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Facebook admits bug allowed apps to see hidden photos (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Bug let developers access pictures people had uploaded but chosen not to post A Facebook bug let app developers see photos users had uploaded but never posted, the social network has disclosed. For two weeks in September, an error in the way Facebook shares photos with third parties meant that apps could see not only photos users had posted on their newsfeed, but also pictures in other parts of the site – on Facebook Stories or Facebook’s Marketplace, for instance. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Thousands welcome Emmeline Pankhurst statue in Manchester (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Sculpture of suffragette is only second statue of woman in city after Queen Victoria Thousands of people have turned out in the freezing cold to welcome home Emmeline Pankhurst – the first female statue in Manchester that is not of Queen Victoria. The Moss Side-born suffragette was the overwhelming winner in a public vote three years ago to choose which woman should be immortalised in bronze, beating the Victorian novelist Elizabeth Gaskell, the anti-racism campaigner Louise da-Cocodia and “Red” Ellen Wilkinson, the Labour cabinet minister and leader of the Jarrow March. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Khashoggi killer heard saying 'I know how to cut' on audio – Erdoğan (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Turkish president says tape has been shared with US, Germany, France and Canada One of the killers of the Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was heard saying “I know how to cut” on the audio of the murder, which Turkey has shared with US and European officials, the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, said on Friday. Erdoğan criticised Riyadh for its changing account of how Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist and prominent critic of the Saudi crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, was murdered at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on 2 Oct. The journalist had gone there to collect documents for his forthcoming marriage. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Donald Trump knew hush money was wrong, says Cohen (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
US president’s former lawyer says Trump directed him to pay money to two women who alleged having sexual affairs with him Follow the latest US politics news Donald Trump knew he was doing wrong when he directed hush money to be paid to two women during the 2016 election, his former lawyer and fixer has said. “He directed me to make the payments. He directed me to become involved in these matters,” Michael Cohen, who was sentenced to three years in prison this week over crimes committed while working for Trump, told ABC News in an interview aired on Friday. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

High court dismisses woman's attempt to prosecute police spy (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Woman deceived into sexual relationship with Jim Boyling says judges’ ruling is appalling An environmental campaigner who was deceived by a police spy into a sexual relationship has lost an attempt to have him prosecuted. The campaigner, known as Monica because she was granted anonymity, said the ruling by two high court judges was “appalling and hard to hear”. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Paris braces for fifth weekend of protests by gilets jaunes (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Demonstrations to continue despite demands to call off action after Strasbourg attack Thousands of riot police and armoured vehicles will be deployed in Paris on Saturday as France anticipates a fifth weekend of anti-government protests in the capital and other cities. Despite government pleas for the gilets jaunes protesters to call off street demonstrations in the wake of this week’s terror attack in Strasbourg, many vowed to continue their struggle. The grassroots protest movement has continued all week on roundabouts and tollbooths, and authorities believe Saturday’s street marches will go ahead. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Yemen ceasefire: hope gives way to worry about whether deal will stick (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Situation on ground in Hodeidah will test UN-brokered deal, say analysts Initial hope after a breakthrough round of peace talks on Yemen in Sweden has quickly given way to worries over how the agreed measures will be implemented. The UN secretary general, António Guterres, said on Thursday that the Houthi rebels and the Saudi-led coalition had agreed to an immediate ceasefire and the withdrawal of troops from the port city of Hodeidah, as well as the setting up of humanitarian corridors and the future deployment of UN-supervised neutral forces. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Gordon Brown: I didn't think I'd see child poverty again in my lifetime (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Ex-chancellor’s tax credits started to erase problem – but universal credit reverses trend Gordon Brown is on familiar territory. The former prime minister is parked on a sofa in a family centre in the heart of his old constituency and holding forth about poverty. The venue, a family centre called the Cottage, is in the Templehall part of Kirkcaldy and easy to miss. The poverty that it is helping to alleviate is not. When it launched its first Christmas appeal eight years ago – the year Brown’s Labour government was turfed out of office – the centre assisted 80 families. Last year it was 950: this year it will be 1,200. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Bank of England to cut staff expenses after £390,000 travel bill row (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Allowances made public for first time and policy will come into force in March 2019 The Bank of England is cutting meal and hotel allowances for staff after coming under fire over a £390,000 travel bill racked up by two of its economics advisers. The central bank has for the first time published its travel and expenses policy to the public, following criticism by MPs over the “staggering” costs run up by US-based members of its financial policy committee. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Is the net closing in on Donald Trump? – podcast (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
The investigation into Donald Trump’s election campaign has resulted in guilty pleas from some of the president’s former inner circle. The Guardian’s Jon Swaine in New York considers what we have learned so far from Robert Mueller’s forensic investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 US election. Plus: Robert Booth on the first phase of the inquiry into the Grenfell Tower fire Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 US election has seen the latest in a series of high-profile guilty pleas in recent weeks. The president’s former lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen joined his former campaign chair Paul Manafort and his former national security adviser Michael Flynn in cooperating with the FBI. The Guardian’s Jon Swaine takes Anushka Asthana through the major turning points so far in Mueller’s inquiry and considers where it could go next. Is the net closing in on the president, his property business and his immediate family? Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Theresa May: a crisis of confidence (Thu, 13 Dec 2018)
After a frenzied day of infighting among Conservative MPs, Theresa May remains prime minister, having survived a vote of confidence in her leadership. But how damaging has the episode been for her party? Anushka Asthana hears from the Guardian’s Jessica Elgot and Conservative MPs Ben Bradley, Nicky Morgan and Sarah Wollaston. Plus: Natalie Nougayrède on a make-or-break week for Emmanuel Macron So Theresa May battles on. Her enemies in the Conservative party tried to remove her – and they monumentally failed. The prime minister has survived a confidence vote and will now attempt to resuscitate her faltering Brexit deal. But the day’s drama exposed the splits in Britain’s ruling party. Divisions are ideological, bitter and increasingly personal. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Stansted 15: the conviction of peaceful protesters (Wed, 12 Dec 2018)
The conviction of protesters who locked themselves around a deportation flight at Stansted airport has been called a ‘crushing blow for human rights’. The Guardian’s Damien Gayle has been following the case and hears from demonstrators and deportees. Plus: Soraya Chemaly on the importance of female rage On the night of 28 March 2017, a group of activists cut a hole in a perimeter fence at Stansted airport and blocked the takeoff of an immigration removal flight. It had been chartered by the Home Office to remove 60 people to Nigeria, Ghana and Sierra Leone. On Monday, the group were found guilty under the 1990 Aviation and Maritime Security Act, a law passed in response to the 1988 Lockerbie bombing. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

209 female MPs by 209 female photographers – in pictures (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
To celebrate the 100th anniversary of the first election in which some women and all men could vote, 209 female photographers have taken portraits of the 209 women MPs in the UK parliament. The exhibition, 209 Women, opens at Portcullis House on Friday. We look at a selection of the portraits Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'It's a cool time to be alive!' – fiddle sensation Gaelynn Lea on proving her doctors wrong (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
The award-winning musician, who was born with brittle bone disease, talks about going on tour, finding love – and fighting for accessible green rooms Six weeks before her wedding Gaelynn Lea was dangerously ill in hospital after complications from surgery. She had to persuade the doctors to let her fiance stay overnight, since they weren’t technically married. “And every night he was asleep in this little chair by the bed. Going through this intense experience confirmed a lot of things for me: that he was as good a guy as I could have found. And that you make it through together.” Lea recovered and the wedding went ahead. A year later, working as a full-time music teacher in her home town of Duluth, Minnesota, and doing regular solo fiddle shows, she decided to write a song inspired by that time. “Side by side,” she wrote, “we face the night.” The result was Someday We’ll Linger in the Sun – a haunting melody that won NPR’s prestigious Tiny Desk song contest, beating more than 6,000 other entries. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Britain's hostile environment is humiliating. You can help people regain their dignity (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
I was mentally and financially broken by trying to fight the Home Office. These charities help Please donate to our appeal here For me, the worst thing about battling the hostile environment was the loss of dignity. It wasn’t the lack of certainty, or even the fear that your life as you knew it could be taken away by a deportation order. It was that while you were navigating the immigration system and its arbitrary cruelty, you were humiliated. You were made to beg. So broken is the Home Office, so crippled by years of changing laws and poor funding, that once you have fallen foul of it, there is little reason or coherence to the process. And so you flail around, feeding it documents, attending its endless interviews, paying money into it with every application, with little confidence that it will do any good. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sondra Locke: a charismatic performer defined by a toxic relationship with Clint Eastwood (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Locke was an excellent actor, and serious-minded director, but became trapped by her involvement with Eastwood and subsequent legal disputes Sondra Locke was an actor, producer, director and talented singer. But it was her destiny to be linked forever with Clint Eastwood, whose partner she was from the mid-1970s to the late 1980s. She was a sexy, charismatic performer with a tough, lean look who starred alongside Eastwood in hit movies like The Outlaw Josey Wales, The Gauntlet, Every Which Way But Loose (in which she sang her own songs — also for the sequel Any Which Way You Can) and Bronco Billy. But the pair became trapped in one of the most notoriously toxic relationships in Hollywood history, an ugly, messy and abusive overlap of the personal and professional — a case of love gone sour and mentorship gone terribly wrong. Related: Sondra Locke - a life in pictures Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'People assume I'm a rapper': can country music get over racial prejudice? (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Black artists Jimmie Allen and Kane Brown are using their talent to change perceptions and earn mainstream recognition In November, something unprecedented happened in the world of country music: two black artists reached No 1 spots in the same week. Jimmie Allen, a 32-year-old singer and songwriter from Delaware – an east coast state not normally associated with country – became the first black artist to chart a No 1 debut single for country radio airplay with his song Best Shot. And YouTube-covers-artist-turned-country-star Kane Brown hit the top spot on the Billboard album chart with his second album, Experiment. Allen first moved to Nashville in 2007 and spent the best part of a decade trying to get signed. “At first, things weren’t going my way,” he tells me. “I was something new – no one was going to take a chance on a black artist from Delaware – so I lived in my car for four months, working in a gym where I would wash my clothes and shower. I did any job you could think of, from waiter to janitor to personal trainer.” His persistence clearly paid off but Allen is emphatic about the effort it has taken. “I was one of those guys where nothing ever fell into my lap, I had to go out and work for it,” he says. “Especially since there is a lack of experience of people who look like me.” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'We did our best': police who rushed to Skripal scene tell of shock and pride (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Sgt Tracey Holloway and PC Alex Collins give their first account of Salisbury novichok attack Two police officers who rushed to help the Russian former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter after they were attacked with a nerve agent have described how emergency first responders and a passing doctor helped save the pair. Sgt Tracey Holloway and PC Alex Collins, speaking in detail for the first time, said more people could have been injured in the novichok attack in Salisbury and expressed hope that the perpetrators would eventually be brought to justice. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Can Poland wean itself off coal? (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Climate experts say the renaissance can be stopped but change must happen now – and the main obstacle is at the top Poland’s deadly addiction to coal – in pictures Displays of coal jewellery and coal soap, coal in a glass walkway beneath your feet, coal in the air that you breathe … the Polish hosts of this week’s UN climate talks have been anything but subtle in reminding delegates that we still live in a fossil-fuelled world despite the urgent necessity to move to a cleaner path. The conference centre is near the mineshaft of the colliery museum in Katowice, the heartland of Silesia’s vast coal industry. The sponsors include JSW, the EU’s largest coking coal producer, and PGE, which runs the world’s second-largest fossil-fuel power plant. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

‘I felt like an impostor’: a mixed-race American in Africa (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
‘Passing for white’ was a complicated feeling at home in Ohio. In Chad, it was a whole different experience again. By Alexander Hurst Every time I crossed the courtyard, walked past the well in the corner and slipped out of the baby blue gate nestled into the high brick wall that surrounded my Chadian host family’s house, I instantly became nasara. It’s a Ngambay word that means both “foreigner” and “white person” at the same time. A little pack of children would follow me down the red-dirt street, chanting “nah-sa-rah, nah-sa-rah” and laughing. During my first weeks in Moundou I had protested once – in jest – to Sem, a balding evangelical pastor with a belly and a deep laugh, who was my NGO’s main contact in the town. “You know my mom is black, right?” I said to him, from the passenger seat of his SUV. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Brownfinger May pulls off ‘le backwards’ in Brussels and heads for Pizza Hut stardom | Marina Hyde (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Even for aficionados of the comedy of embarrassment, this week has been a hard watch For all the drama of her stand-up row with Jean-Claude Juncker, the top line on Theresa May’s save-the-day mission to Brussels is that it resulted in the EU actually removing the only helpful paragraph of the draft conclusions. Never mind “the backstop”; this is what is known as “the backwards” – or “le backwards”, on the continent. Perhaps they should have kept Brownfinger off the plane to Brussels, given that everything she touches turns to this. Things have now gone so badly that I would expect May to be offered a Pizza Hut advert the minute she lands back in the UK. Her fictional analogue is the League of Gentlemen vet, Mr Chinnery, whose ministrations would routinely end in the dog exploding, the tortoise exploding or the parrot exploding. Or an entire pond of koi carp being electrocuted. For the love of God, Veterinary May: please stop trying to make things better. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Nine-jobs George has no idea about the poverty many British workers face | Stefan Stern (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Osborne has delivered this situation. Years of failing wages can’t be salvaged by a small pay growth – 3.3% of naff all is naff all At the risk of adding to the Christmas repeats: what about the workers? It’s a traditional question, but a good and necessary one. The official figures seem to reveal a fairly positive picture. There are high levels of employment, while unemployment remains low in spite of economic uncertainty. Earlier this week the Office for National Statistics said that pay was now growing at an above-inflation rate of 3.3%. But then there is the nightmare before Christmas, the reality of what working people are actually experiencing. And it is this: adjusted for inflation, people are still getting paid less on average than they were 10 years ago – almost £500 a year less, according to the Resolution Foundation. And according to the Office for Budget Responsibility, wages will not return to their pre-financial crisis peak until at least 2024. New research from the TUC has found that pay is worth a third less in some parts of the country than a decade ago. The average worker has lost a total of £11,800 in real earnings since 2008, the TUC says, the worst real-wage slump among leading economies. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sexist adverts limit our children’s horizons. Let’s keep fighting them | Joanna Moorhead (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Yes, we’ve moved on since the really bad old days – but as a new ruling on sexist ads show, damaging stereotypes still abound Twentysomethings are getting fed up with what they see as an overload of political correctness, which is bad news. One young woman in my family heard a piece on Newsbeat this morning about the clampdown on advertising that’s sexist or stereotyping, and told me she thinks it’s getting out of hand, and we should all stop getting so overexcited about it. Related: UK advertising watchdog to crack down on sexist stereotypes Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Westminster has known the options since 2016. Which Brexit does it want? | Rafael Behr (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
The chaotic theatre of British politics doesn’t change facts. There are three possible approaches – and time is running out Once again a Brussels summit and British politics cross paths like celestial bodies on intersecting orbits. For just a few moments a cold hard ball of EU reality eclipses the gaseous inferno that is Westminster. Theresa May has not secured any meaningful change to her withdrawal agreement. No sunset clauses will be introduced to the “backstop” that is designed to prevent a hard Irish border appearing after Brexit. Related: EU leaders reject May's idea to salvage her Brexit deal Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Eighteen months after the Grenfell Tower fire, lives are still at risk | Seraphima Kennedy (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Where is justice? The inquiry is yet to make a single recommendation and delay only adds to the trauma When the six-month anniversary of the fire at Grenfell Tower took place at St Paul’s, one year ago today, it followed two days of procedural hearings at the Grenfell Tower inquiry. Whether or not the inquiry could deliver justice was unclear. Trust was low. Many survivors were still in hotels. It was bitterly cold. The community came together, publicly, and that evening carried green LED tealights and home-made votives along the route of the Silent Walk. When Theresa May announced the terms of reference of the Grenfell Tower inquiry, she promised a swift inquiry that would make urgent recommendations to ensure lessons were learned in the interests of public safety. The prime minister promised families would be at the heart of the process. A chairman was appointed, quickly. When families requested a panel, this was denied (three days before Christmas), because May said there was enough expertise at the inquiry. Families were told that appointing a panel would delay any interim findings and that these findings were urgent. Public safety was at stake. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Confidence vote done, Brexit is still ruining my life | John Crace (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Also this week: Harry Redknapp’s bushtucker charm and Londoners’ NYT crime reports There are many days I question my own sanity. This weekend being the most recent example. Driving home late on Saturday night from watching Spurs play in Leicester, my car got a puncture on the M1 and the run-flat tyre predictably failed to run flat. Leaving me stuck on the hard shoulder with no spare as the manufacturer no longer bothers to supply one. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Guardian and Observer appeal 2018: our chosen charities (Fri, 07 Dec 2018)
The work we are supporting defends individuals in the UK’s ‘hostile environment’ Please donate to our appeal here The 2018 Guardian and Observer appeal is supporting five charities which were instrumental in securing justice for the Windrush generation. Their work defends the rights of all whose lives are unfairly disrupted by the UK’s hostile immigration system. Here’s a brief guide to what they do: Praxis Community Projects Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Ashley Giles appointed England’s new director of cricket (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
• Former England left-arm spinner replaces Andrew Strauss • Appointment follows month-long recruitment process Ashley Giles has been named as the new managing director of England men’s cricket, the England and Wales Cricket Board has announced. The 45-year-old replaces former England team-mate Andrew Strauss in the role, with the latter having stepped down in October in order to spend more time with his family. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Liverpool v Manchester United buildup, Chelsea latest and more – live! (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Countdown to weekend’s football in the Premier League and beyond Chelsea face partial stadium closure if Uefa finds fans guilty Email Simon or tweet him @Simon_Burnton 4.35pm GMT Everything you wanted to know about Fulham v West Ham but were too busy thinking about Liverpool v Manchester United to ask: Related: Fulham v West Ham United: match preview 4.34pm GMT It’s always good to keep an eye on the next generation of young talent, particularly when they have a name this good. Sonny Blu Lo-Everton is right up there with the all-time great player names, perhaps not quite on the same level as Creedence Clearwater Couto and Nortei Nortey, but not far off. | WHAT A GOAL SON-NY! INCREDIBLE winning goal in #watfordfc's FA Youth Cup victory last night from 16 year-old Sonny Blu Lo-Everton Check this rocket out! pic.twitter.com/cYJ9VWEbzX Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Coaches 'did not like Jess Varnish questioning their training' (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
British Cycling disapproved of rider’s assertiveness, doctor tells employment tribunal British Cycling coaches had “absolute control” over cyclists and disapproved of them questioning their training regimes, according to a doctor’s evidence at the employment tribunal of the Olympic cyclist Jess Varnish. Varnish has accused British Cycling of exercising “extreme control” over her and other athletes in her long-running legal attempt to sue the organisation for sex discrimination and unfair dismissal. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Champions Cup preview: Carbery to start for Munster; Kruis back at Saracens (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
• Graham Kitchener makes return for Leicester • Newcastle ring changes against Edinburgh Related: Premiership clubs in danger of building mental block about Europe | Robert Kitson Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Formula E gears up with car batteries that can last a whole race | Giles Richards (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
For its fifth season, the electric series has new cars, ‘Mario Kart’ boosts and racing veterans, with Felipe Massa joining the grid Formula E has always enjoyed grand city centre destinations as a central tenet of the all-electric series. Beginning its fifth season on Saturday, however, there is a sense that it is in a position to deliver the drama such grand stages demand, now boasting technology, drivers and manufacturers coming together with greater coherence and credibility than ever. The new season opens in Riyadh, the first of 13 races held across 12 meetings. There will be no race in the UK, which has not held FE since its last appearance in London’s Battersea Park in the second season, but other cities including New York, Paris, Rome, Hong Kong, Berlin and Monaco will all play host to the series that held its first round in 2014. Four years on the racing has fundamentally changed for the better. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

World Cup squads face wait for Premiership players due to insurance dispute (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
• Premiership Rugby may hold back players until mid-August • Wales and Scotland among those who would be hardest hit An insurance wrangle between World Rugby and the Premiership is threatening to severely hamper World Cup preparations for nations such as Wales and Scotland who could be deprived of their players in the buildup to the tournament. If the dispute is not resolved, the Guardian understands Premiership Rugby Limited (PRL) intends to prevent players from nations other than England joining their teams until mid-August, when the official Test window opens, only 35 days before the first match in Japan. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Chelsea face partial stadium closure if Uefa finds fans guilty of antisemitism (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
• Uefa to decide whether to open disciplinary case • Fàbregas happy if Chelsea ‘taught a lesson’ to tackle racism Chelsea will be forced to close part of Stamford Bridge in the Europa League if Uefa concludes their fans were guilty of an antisemitic chant in Budapest. The governing body hopes to receive on Friday reports which will enable it to decide whether to open a disciplinary case. Chelsea have strongly condemned a section of their fans for a chant which referenced “yids” in the Europa League game at Vidi but Uefa needs to take its own judgment. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Manchester joins London in bid to host ATP Finals tennis from 2021 (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Singapore, Tokyo and Turin also in running for event London has staged tournament at O2 since 2009 Manchester has joined London as a leading candidate to host the ATP Finals from 2021 to 2025. The end-of-season tournament is to be held at the O2 Arena in London through to 2020. That deal could be extended, while the ATP announced on Friday that Manchester, Singapore, Tokyo and Turin are the other shortlisted cities. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Felicity Cloake and Rachel Roddy’s Christmas desserts - video (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
The Guardian Feast cooks share tips for making a perfect yule log and prosecco jelly Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

From the Tavern to the Palace: the decade since darts went large – video (Thu, 13 Dec 2018)
It’s now more than a decade since the PDC world championship moved from the Circus Tavern in Purfleet to London’s Alexandra Palace and the game of darts has grown beyond all expectations. We talked to a number of the figures behind the growth of the game both in front and behind the cameras Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Can women save Sumo? The crossroads facing Japan's national sport – video (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
The ancient Japanese ritual of Sumo is in crisis. Only last week, a Mongolian wrestler was forced to retire after assaulting a teammate – but that's just the tip of the iceberg. Years of controversy and scandal, coupled with the country's declining population, have greatly impacted the sport's ability to attract new talent. The Guardian visits Tokyo's Ryōgoku district, the birthplace of Sumo, to see how this iconic institution is adapting to life in the 21st century, and why - despite women being banned from the ring itself - young female fans are flocking to watch it like never before Yokozuna, controversies and a 'Dump Truck': a sumo history – in pictures Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Skip Day - high school friendship and everyday racism in Florida (Thu, 29 Nov 2018)
Intimate glimpses of one very special day in the lives of high-school seniors from an industrial corner of the Florida Everglades: prom’s over, the future is uncertain, and the irresistible pull of the beach makes the long-time friends drive 60 miles to chill, pose and revel in the waves. Once at the beach, friendship, discussions about what's next, and an unwelcome dose of everyday racism mix. Winner of the Illy Prize for best short film at Directors’ Fortnight, Cannes Film Festival. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Lloyd Russell-Moyle tells Owen Jones: 'I came out as HIV positive to break down stigma' – video (Wed, 05 Dec 2018)
Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle came out as HIV positive in a speech in the House of Commons. He tells the Guardian’s Owen Jones his diagnosis initially left him feeling like his insides had been ripped out but those fears gradually washed away and he has been able to live his life. He says he hopes his announcement can help break the stigma around HIV and help other people. An extended version of this interview is available on Owen Jones’s YouTube channel Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

​A day with Mr Stop Brexit: crashing TV interviews and fighting Ukip – video (Wed, 28 Nov 2018)
Best known for interrupting news broadcasts and shouting: 'Stop Brexit', Steve Bray has become parliament's most persistent protester since the EU referendum result. So what motivates him to stand in Westminster come rain, wind, sun or snow?  Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Yotam Ottolenghi’s Christmas dinner with Grace Dent - video (Fri, 07 Dec 2018)
The star cook serves up a showstopper celebration meal: slow-roast Szechuan pepper lamb with aubergine, plus potato gratin with coconut, chilli and lime, and gingery cucumbers. Our restaurant critic surprises him with a simple, tasty, traditional north of England recipe. Read his recipes and see more videos from Guardian Feast  Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'There was a lot of crying': youngest Booker prize nominee on writing her first novel - video (Thu, 06 Dec 2018)
Daisy Johnson made headlines this year after becoming the youngest person to be shortlisted for the Man Booker prize with her debut novel Everything Under. Iman Amrani speaks to her about her book, which has been described as a feminist retelling of a well-known myth, which plays with the boundaries of reality and the supernatural  This interview is part of a series called Fresh Voices, presented by Amrani Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'I certainly opened up a conversation': Lubaina Himid on her Guardian residency – video (Mon, 03 Dec 2018)
The 2017 Turner prize-winning artist Lubaina Himid is the first Guardian artist in residence. After spending four days in the Guardian's London office she created a work entitled Random Coincidence, which included the artist painting over pages from the paper over a week-long period. Himid's focus was the paper's representation of black people and the juxtaposition of text and image. This project was initiated in collaboration with Liverpool’s Rapid Response Unit as part of a larger commission linking artists to the news cycle. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Harry and Meghan put wedding fireworks on 2018 Christmas card (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
William and Kate opt for a traditional shot while Theresa May’s is typically unrevealing From one royal duke and duchess, a traditional shot: relaxed grins, rumpled jeans, and armfuls of beaming children. From another, an artful black and white photograph of a tender newlywed embrace. Kensington Palace has released images of the Christmas cards sent by William and Kate, and Harry and Meghan, revealing that the quiet determination shown by the new Duchess of Sussex since becoming a royal to do things her own way extends to the couple’s seasonal greeting. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

UK airport travellers receiving less than $1 for every £1 exchanged (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
British tourists in New York face eye-watering Christmas prices, with sterling at new low Travellers at some UK airports are receiving less than $1 for every £1 they change after a week of Brexit turmoil pushed sterling to fresh lows. At Cardiff airport, the bureau de change was offering customers only $0.97 for every £1 on Friday. At Bristol airport, Moneycorp is giving customers only $1.03 for £1, while at Gatwick the rate is only $1.06. At Heathrow, Travelex is paying $1.05 for every £1. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Autistic people listen to their hearts to test anti-anxiety therapy (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Trial seeks further proof that tuning into our internal organs’ activity can reduce anxiety A pioneering therapy aimed at lowering anxiety by tuning into your own heartbeat is being put to the test in the first clinical trial of its kind. The treatment, known as interoception-directed therapy, is being tested on 120 autistic people, for whom anxiety is a common problem. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Rapper J Hus sentenced to eight months in jail for carrying a knife (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
‘I regret my foolish actions,’ says musician who plead guilty after police found him with 10cm blade in east London The rapper J Hus has been sentenced to eight months in jail after admitting to carrying a knife in a public place. Police caught the 22-year-old, AKA Momodou Jallow, with a weapon near the Westfield shopping centre in Stratford, east London, on 21 June. They stopped him and his girlfriend after smelling cannabis. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Baby attacked by two dogs dies in hospital (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Reuben McNulty was less than a month old when attacked by family pets in Cambridgeshire A baby who sustained severe head injuries after being mauled by two dogs last month has died in hospital. Reuben McNulty, who is understood to have been less than a month old when he was attacked by his family’s pets, died at a Cambridge hospital on Thursday, police said. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Man dies after falling from Christmas tree in Kirkcaldy (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
People leaving nightclub in Fife town found injured man in street A man has died after falling from a Christmas tree in central Scotland. Emergency services were called when people leaving Kitty’s nightclub, in Kirkcaldy, Fife, early on Friday found the injured man in a nearby street. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Nine jobs George: Osborne adds new role at venture capital firm (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Ex-UK chancellor and austerity architect adds job as adviser to brother’s tech fund to portfolio George Osborne has added a ninth job to his already bulging portfolio, joining his brother’s Silicon Valley venture capital fund. The former chancellor and current editor of London’s Evening Standard newspaper has been appointed as an adviser to 9Yards Capital. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sports Direct's Mike Ashley considers bid to buy Hamleys (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Centuries-old British toy shop was put up for sale in October after £9.2m annual loss Mike Ashley, the billionaire founder of Sports Direct, is reportedly considering a bid to take over Hamleys, the 258-year-old toy retailer best known for its flagship store on Regent Street in London. Sports Direct was on Friday said to be among a pack of retailers to have lodged their interest in taking over Hamleys, which has been put up for sale by its Chinese owner C.banner. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Police look at whether Strasbourg attacker had accomplices (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
French prosecutor announces fourth victim has died from wounds suffered in Christmas market attack French police are investigating whether the gunman who killed four people in an attack near Strasbourg’s Christmas market had accomplices. Chérif Chakatt was shot dead by police in Strasbourg on Thursday night after a 48-hour manhunt. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Serbia talks up armed intervention as Kosovo approves new army (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Parliament in Pristina backs formation of army despite criticism from Nato Serbia has talked up the possibility of an armed intervention in Kosovo after the parliament in Pristina overwhelmingly approved the formation of an army. Belgrade called the move the “most direct threat to peace and stability in the region”, while Nato’s chief said it was “ill-timed” and urged dialogue. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Shakira charged with tax evasion in Spain (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Colombian singer alleged to have avoided £13m tax by saying she lived in Bahamas Spanish prosecutors have charged the Colombian singer and philanthropist Shakira with tax evasion, alleging she avoided €14.5m (£13m) in taxes by claiming to live in the Bahamas while actually resident in Catalonia. Shakira changed residences in 2015 from the Bahamas to Barcelona, where she lives with her partner, the Barcelona footballer Gerard Piqué, and the couple’s two sons. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Guatemalan girl aged seven dies in custody on US-Mexico border (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Girl dies of dehydration and shock more than eight hours after her arrest in New Mexico Follow the latest US politics news A seven-year-old girl who crossed the US-Mexico border with her father last week has died after being taken into the custody of the US border patrol, federal immigration authorities said. The Washington Post reported that the girl died of dehydration and shock more than eight hours after she was arrested by agents near Lordsburg, New Mexico. The girl, from Guatemala, was traveling with a group of 163 people who approached agents to turn themselves in on 6 December. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Brazilian court orders arrest of Italian former leftwing guerrilla (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Brazil’s rightwing president-elect has pledged to extradite Cesare Battisti as a gift to Rome A supreme court judge in Brazil has ordered the arrest of an Italian writer and former leftwing guerrilla wanted in Italy for four murders attributed to a far-left group in the 1970s. Cesare Battisti, 63, a former member of Armed Proletarians for Communism, which disbanded in 1979, has been on the run from Italian authorities for decades. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

First Dutch bananas could help tackle worldwide fungal threat (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
University grows 60 plants on coco peat and rock wool, avoiding soil-borne disease A Dutch university has grown the Netherlands’ first crop of bananas as part of a research programme that could help protect the fruit from a deadly fungus that threatens production worldwide. Wageningen University grew 60 banana plants in its greenhouses on coco peat and rock wool, avoiding the threat of a soil-borne fungal disease that could destroy hundreds of thousands of hectares of banana plants around the world, local media reported. The crop will be offered to local hospitals and restaurants. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'She did it all': Grammy award-winning singer Nancy Wilson dies aged 81 (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Wilson, whose hits ranged from R&B to jazz and funk and called herself a ‘song stylist’, died in California after a long illness Grammy award-winning singer Nancy Wilson, whose hits ranged from R&B to jazz and funk, died at her California home at age 81 on Thursday after a long illness, her publicist has said. Wilson, who came to fame as a torch singer in the 1960s, called herself a “song stylist” and resisted labeling as a jazz singer for most of her career since she could cross many genres. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Egypt arrests two people accused of helping stage naked photoshoot on pyramid (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Officials question authenticity of photo and describe it as ‘violation of public morality’ Egypt has reportedly arrested two people accused of helping a Danish photographer stage a naked photoshoot on top of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Photographer Andreas Hvid sparked controversy in Egypt after he published a photo showing himself and a woman naked on top of the pyramid, provoking an investigation by Egypt’s ministry of the interior and condemnation from many Egyptians. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Bolognese and bonding: why I love cooking with my children (Thu, 06 Dec 2018)
With smart appliances like the Samsung Family Hub™ fridge, getting your kids to help out in the kitchen is easier than ever. Mum-of-three Antonia Windsor explains why cooking with your kids is the perfect opportunity for bonding, belly laughs and some stealth maths Related: From coal fires to voice-control fridges: the ever-changing world of the kitchen By the time my middle child Ziggy, now five, was just nine months old he had already joined me in the kitchen. He would sit on the floor with pans while I threw down the potato peelings for him to stir and spoon. I loved this bonding time with him, and proudly posted pictures of him on social media: my chef in the making. My two-year-old Zenya is following in his footsteps, often by my side while I’m chopping, offering up plates of pretend pizza for me to mime eating or cups of imaginary hot chocolate to sip. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

The 12 saves of Christmas: an expert survival guide (Thu, 01 Nov 2018)
From emergency gift ideas to master mixology – via Jackson Boxer’s ballotine and Patrick Grant’s suit – experts share their must-haves and must-dos for surviving the festive season Photography: Sam Hofman 1. Anna Smith, film critic“I’ve learned the hard way that families require light, cheerful viewing after Christmas lunch. If in doubt, I now reach for Home Alone – guaranteed laughs for all ages – or White Christmas, which has that reassuring retro glow.” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Quick and easy roast chicken – with a twist (Fri, 07 Dec 2018)
Cookery writer Eve Marleau adds a French-inspired twist to a traditional roast chicken with Boursin As a kid in the late 80s and early 90s, for me, Boursin had one role – to act as an exotic option on the Christmas cheeseboard. In my prime, I could eat upwards of 10 Carr’s table water biscuits slathered in Boursin after seconds of turkey pie and an inordinate amount of chocolate mould dessert. But as a grownup – and as someone who gets more excited over the possibilities contained within the leftovers than the initial purpose of an ingredient – the garlicky cheese with the chant-inducing advert has come to represent versatility as well as comforting familiarity. I’ve long been stirring Boursin through fettuccine with lemon-roasted broccoli, or dolloping spoonfuls on top of slow-roasted red peppers, tomato and fennel. I’ve whisked it with milk to make the sauce for potato dauphinois, combined with soured cream, red onions and prawns, and even spread it on stale sourdough, scattered with pancetta and baked with whisked eggs to make a savoury bread and butter pudding. As an ingredient, it is undeniably simple yet effective, saving the lives of many a withered fridge companion. However, my favourite use is a relatively recent discovery, from a French friend: a roast chicken recipe – with a twist. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

From Bach to Bauhaus: discover the culture of Thuringia, Germany (Mon, 15 Oct 2018)
Immerse yourself in the German artistic gems that changed how we see the world Thuringia is the cultural heart of Germany, a place of inspiration for world-famous artists, writers, musicians and intellectuals. Remarkably, much of Thuringia’s cobbled streets and old stone architecture has barely changed since the time of Bach et al, so as well as touring the many museums devoted to these famous creative and intellectual figures, you have the opportunity to literally walk in their footsteps. Start right here ... Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

John Legend: A Legendary Christmas review – tasteful covers need a tot of sherry (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Its classy backings, star guests and deep cuts avoid tackiness, but Legend should have got out the tinsel and loosened up The world needs more new Christmas music: it sounds like something only a raving maniac would say, but there’s a grain of truth in it. The pantheon of celebrated Christmas pop songs is a surprisingly small. There have been attempts to expand the canon over the years by including songs that were relative flops on release – Elton John’s Step Into Christmas, left in the dust by Slade and Wizzard back in 1973, or the Waitresses’ Christmas Wrapping, in at 45 with a bullet in 1982 – but you could still fit the lot on one CD. And it’s the absolute apotheosis of music you’re going to hear whether you want to or not. In Britain at least, the only way to avoid repeated exposure to Wonderful Christmastime and Fairytale of New York over December is to adopt a lifestyle of hermetic seclusion with no access to broadcast media and no contact with your fellow man, or to spend the entire month wearing earplugs, drastic approaches both. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Beat the 'crunch': new union for video games workers launches (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Game Workers Unite UK will take aim at unpaid overtime, racism and sexism in sector It is known as “crunch” – long hours of unpaid overtime put in by computer games workers in the run-up to highly anticipated releases, often at the behest of managers. But the practice could soon be a thing of the past, as games workers unionise for the first time this weekend, taking aim at overtime, racism, sexism and bullying, which some say is rife in the sector. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

It’s a Wonderful Life review – Capra's Christmas cracker shines anew (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
A crisis in housing, a racist ruling class and a struggle against a hideous ego-plutocrat who names everything after himself – this 1946 classic still resonates ‘If Potter gets hold of this Building and Loan, there’ll never be another decent house built in this town. He’s already got charge of the bank. He’s got the bus line. He got the department stores. And now he’s after us!” Poor George Bailey gets a vision of awful, grasping Potter getting everything and naming everything after himself: Pottersville, a hideous ego-plutocrat takeover. And if he had a hotel chain, it would be called something alliterative, no doubt, like … Potter Palace? And so Frank Capra’s 1946 classic It’s a Wonderful Life comes back to UK cinemas for the umpteenth Christmas runout. The movie which gained mixed notices on release, became wildly popular on US television in the mid-70s when the copyright lapsed and it could be broadcast for nothing – the networks took to showing it every year, to a wave of love and an illusory sense that it had always been this popular. (In 1993, Republic Pictures managed to regain its copyright, ending this gratis TV bonanza which had put their movie in the homes and hearts of millions of Americans. It’s an object lesson in how the small screen isn’t always the enemy of cinephilia.) Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Kiss Me, Kate review – ferociously funny festive treat leaves a bitter taste (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Crucible, Sheffield Standout turns from strong female leads can’t tame the darkness at the heart of Cole Porter’s Shakespearean musical Kiss Me, Kate is a musical of many layers. The fiction within a fiction was itself inspired by the on- and off-stage bickering of husband and wife Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne during a production of The Taming of the Shrew. In Cole Porter’s classic musical – with book by another husband and wife team, Bella and Sam Spewack – Lunt and Fontanne’s counterparts are the recently divorced director-producer-actor Fred Graham and his leading lady Lilli Vanessi. As Petruchio and Katherine tear strips off each other on stage, another battle is taking place in the wings. Theatre tends to revel in shows about shows, and this is no exception. As the pair of quarrelling thesps, Edward Baker-Duly and Rebecca Lock delight in the vanity and egotism of these two former lovers. Baker-Duly’s Fred is a particularly pompous creation, confident in his own genius yet entirely outshone by Lilli when they take to the stage. For the Shrew scenes, Janet Bird’s versatile design swiftly and comically transforms, with footlights sprouting out of the floor and garish backdrops swooping down from above. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Jonny Woo: ‘I don't get heckled, I shut them up before they open their mouths’ (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
The standup, actor and drag superstar on the things that make him laugh the most Myra DuBois. She’s the best standup on the gay scene in London. Best off script and she can rattle on without a break for two hours. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Chic & Nile Rodgers review – timeless party classics at the Nile high club (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
SSE Hydro, Glasgow Sticking to beloved hits and backed by formidable vocalists, Rodgers has the audience dancing from the get-go on his biggest ever UK tour This summer Nile Rodgers curated a music festival in a rolling Glasgow park. Day one was stacked with funk and soul veterans such as Roy Ayers while the second featured modern artists, including Emeli Sandé. It is testament to Rodgers’ evergreen musical legacy – and exuberant self-belief – that he and his tireless band slotted sweetly into the main-stage bill on both days. The suggestion seemed to be that you can never have too much Chic. Six months later and Rodgers is emphatically proving that point, embarking on his biggest UK tour ever while still playing tight sets overflowing with hit songs. In a pair of Versace yowsah-yowsah trousers and twinkling white tux, he looks every inch the Studio 54 disco colossus when he declares: “This may be one of the best nights of my life.” The technically all-seated crowd who jump up for the opening bars of Everybody Dance and bop for the next hour and a half would appear to agree. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Glad to be grey: how women changed the debate on hair colour (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Only a few years ago, the Duchess of Cambridge was pilloried for showing grey roots, but now models both young and old are incorporating the hair colour into modern style The days when women are encouraged to cover up their grey hair until they are deemed old enough to allow their roots to show look to be numbered. The image-led social media site Pinterest has revealed that searches of “going grey” have increased more than 879% and is predicting that in 2019 consumers will “stop fighting the natural ageing process in favour of letting their silver strands shine through”. This newfound embrace of grey hair is, according to Prof Dr Carolyn Mair, who specialises in the psychology of fashion, an extension of the “anti anti-ageing movement that is taking hold”. She notes that “this outward display of self-acceptance and self-confidence brings a sense of empowerment and authenticity. It says: ‘This is me. I know who I am and I like who I am.’” Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

My brother’s in jail for sexually abusing my niece, yet my sons blame her – have I raised two monsters? (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
You must feel enormous shock, but don’t project this anger on to your sons, says Annalisa Barbieri I’m the mother of two teenage boys, aged 19 and 15. We have tried to bring them up as socially aware, kind young men. Last year, my brother’s daughter alleged she had suffered a range of sexual crimes committed by her father over a number of years. He was tried, found guilty and is now in prison. My niece had asked that as few family members as possible were told about what was going on until the outcome of the trial was known. I respected her wishes, so waited until the sentence was passed before telling my sons. Their response has horrified me. It ranged from disbelief that their cousin “let” this happen, to saying how she must have led him on. They also believe she was selfish in reporting the crime – she had moved away, so why couldn’t she “just get over it”? Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Let’s move to Littlehampton, West Sussex: ‘A surreal mishmash’ (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Several eras have left an imprint on this south-coast seaside resort, right up to today’s star architects What’s going for it? What will future historians make of Littlehampton? It’s a curious place, stitched together from various patches that align but somehow don’t connect. At its centre, an old Sussex port on the River Arun, church, quayside, winding lanes and still intact. To the south, facing the sea, a 19th-century resort from the era when salt water and bracing breezes were the cure for all ills. To the west, the dunes and silence of Atherington beach. East? 1920s and 1930s private estates of luxury villas, high walls and climbing roses, as if the upper crust cast of various Agatha Christie whodunnits had settled en masse. Laid over the top, a layer of 1930s to 1960s municipal seasideness – seawalls, proms, concrete, the marvellous bleached-white shelters of Mewsbrook Park, the miniature railway terminus. Here and there, arrivals from the era of regeneration and seaside gentrification (Littlehampton has never quite become the new Margate), designed by assorted young and star architects. It makes for bizarre juxtapositions, surreal even. Littlehampton is a curious place. But all the better for it. The case against… That English south-coast bleakness, the sea often “indistinguishable from the sky”, as Virginia Woolf once put it. Still old-fashioned, in good and bad senses. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

The Twinkle: a Christmas cocktail | The Good Mixer (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
An elegant yet simple champagne cocktail for Christmas celebrations With everything else going on in the kitchen at Christmas, the last thing you need is to give yourself an extra headache over making the pre-dinner drinks. Keep things simple with this elegant champagne cocktail. Serves 1 Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Anna Jones’ alternative Christmas pudding recipe | The Modern Cook (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
A lighter, zesty take on the traditional dessert, plus a big plate of iced lebkuchen cookies My family has two puddings on Christmas Day: one Christmas pud for Mum, who adores it, and another, usually a chocolate affair, for those who don’t. But this year, I hope to unite us all with a lighter, brighter version of the traditional dessert, packed with freshly grated (not candied) citrus, lots of stem ginger and chunks of marzipan throughout. This, with a jot of custard or cream, will hopefully win over the sceptics at the table. My favourite festive treat of all has to be lebkuchen. They always grace the plate we put out for Father Christmas, who seems to like them, as he only ever leaves a few crumbs. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Sweet sherry is too good to leave out for Santa | Fiona Beckett on wine (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Sweet sherry deserves a spot in the festive limelight You may only ever put it out for Santa, but sweet sherry deserves to be one of your festive drinks in its own right, not least because it’s one of the bargains of the wine world. Cream sherry such as Harvey’s Bristol Cream (currently on promotion at Waitrose for £8.69) is probably the one you’re most familiar with, no doubt kept in a cupboard by senior relatives since last Christmas, if not the year before, but there are equally good and certainly cheaper own-label versions around – Sainsbury’s, for example, has a bottle for just £5.50. And if you find it too sweet and syrupy, temper that by keeping it in the fridge or serving on the rocks with a slice of orange. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

'The second worst prime minister ever': readers on May's confidence vote (Thu, 13 Dec 2018)
We’re following the discussion on what you think about the prime minister’s confidence vote result and what might be next for her Follow all of Thursday’s Brexit developments The best thing for May to do would be to call a referendum that requires a 60% plurality to pass. If neither side can convince a good majority to support it then it would leave things as they are. This kind of huge wrenching change shouldn’t be based on 51%+. Andrew J Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Have you or your partner recently given birth? Share your experiences with us (Thu, 13 Dec 2018)
We’d like to hear about your physical and mental recovery after birth Most parents will tell you that nothing prepares you for the arrival of your first child. We’d like new parents to help us document the experience of having a baby from the highs to the lows. The arrival of your first baby is often joyful but it can also bring unexpected challenges. Though many feel that they have prepared as much as they can, the experience for women of giving birth and recovery can be stressful. It’s well known that pregnant women and mothers can experience mental health issues but now there’s also official recognition that partners can be affected too. The NHS is now planning to offer mental health checks for new fathers and fathers-to-be. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

What was your favourite book of 2018? (Thu, 13 Dec 2018)
As part of the Guardian’s 2018 in culture series we want to hear what you’ve been reading this year It has been a big year for books, from the spate of Trump-related exposes such as Bob Woodward’s Fear and Michael Wolff’s Fire and Fury, to star-name releases including JK Rowling’s The Crimes of Grindelwald (or her turn as Robert Galbraith in Lethal White), George RR Martin’s Fire and Blood and Michelle Obama’s memoir Becoming. When nominating their favourites of the year, our critics chose novels including Everything Under by Daisy Johnson, Normal People by Sally Rooney, and Jonathan Coe’s Middle England; memoirs including Tara Westover’s Educated and Alan Garner’s Where Shall We Run To?; political books including Isabel Hardman’s Why We Get the Wrong Politicians and Brit(ish) by Afua Hirsch; and poetry collections including Tishani Doshi’s Girls Are Coming Out of the Woods and Vahni Capildeo’s Venus As a Bear. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Send us a tip on a UK winter walk for the chance to win a £200 hotel voucher (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
A good walk and fresh air are perfect for blowing away the Christmas cobwebs. Tell us about your favourite We want to hear about your favourite UK walk to enjoy over the festive period, whether it’s urban, goes through parks, fields and woods or traverses moors and peaks. Please indicate the length of the stroll, starting and end points and any cosy pubs and cafes for refuelling. There’s no need to describe every nuance of the route but place names will help readers work out which paths to take. The walk can be any length. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Down and out in Chippenham: Britain's hidden rural homeless (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Unseen populations living in forests, tents and sheds on the fringes of affluent towns face hostility and indifference Patrick Button clambers down a muddy ditch and into a clump of trees between a playing field and the busy Chippenham bypass. It’s the kind of place you wouldn’t notice, never mind call home. But this was where Button, 43, first tasted life without a roof above his head, one of an uncounted population of hidden homeless in Britain’s rural areas and small towns. Button worked as a carer and shared a two-bedroom home with a long-term partner. When she died suddenly, he lost the house, and within weeks he found himself shifting a rotting badger’s carcass to make room for his tent on the outskirts of the Wiltshire town. He cooked food over an open fire with a boot scraper improvised for a grill. He quickly learned of the hostility homeless people can face. He came back one day to find his tent and possessions, including a picture of his late partner, burnt to ashes, apparently on purpose. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Ukraine-Russia tensions reach Greece’s holy Mount Athos (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Orthodox church’s decision to make Ukrainian branch independent of Russia causes schism and predictions of violence In the chilly pre-dawn gloom one recent morning, Father Makarios hurried to his chapel, one of dozens of churches and cathedrals across Mount Athos, to perform morning liturgy. A two-hour marathon of biblical recitations and sonorous chanting, it would be just one of many services that day. After the liturgy, Makarios, a 68-year-old Greek monk who has lived on Athos for 51 years, changed from his white prayer robes into his habitual black attire and doled out spiritual advice to a group of Belarusian businessmen who had made a pilgrimage to see him, over an austere breakfast of coffee and nuts. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

What happened next? The survivors of the Genoa bridge collapse: ‘We’ve been abandoned, as if nothing happened’ (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
When the Genoa Bridge collapsed in August, it was one of the worst tragedies in modern Italian history. Some people – extraordinarily – survived the 30-metre fall. How have their lives changed since? With heavy rain pounding the roof of their car, Nataliya Yelina and her fiance, Eugeniu Babin, felt the sensation of Genoa’s Morandi bridge rising as they drove across it, as if they were on a drawbridge. Then, all of a sudden, they plummeted. The couple are among the 16 people who survived when a huge span of the bridge collapsed on 14 August, the day before a national holiday. It was one of the worst tragedies in modern Italian history: 43 people were killed, the youngest, eight-year-old Samuele Robbiano. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Rightwing Venezuelan exiles hope Bolsonaro will help rid them of Maduro (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Some believe the rise of Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil’s next president, makes a US-led military intervention in Venezuela more likely Venezuelan dissident Roderick Navarro remembers shedding tears of joy when the far-right firebrand Jair Bolsonaro was confirmed as Brazil’s next president. “It was the first time in so long that I felt the real possibility of going back to my home,” says the rightwing activist exiled to Brazil since fleeing his country last year. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Experience: my namesake found me after 24 years (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
She had known the story of how she got her name all her life and had always wanted to find me After I graduated from university in 1993, I went to work in Auckland for a year, teaching English to foreign students. I had always wanted to travel and my grandfather and one of my aunts lived in New Zealand, which made it an easy option. I quickly settled into my new life. Among my new friends were a Korean couple about my age, Kumlyong and Mihwa, who were in one of my classes. They were great fun; we laughed a lot. Kumlyong and Mihwa had decided to emigrate from South Korea; the political climate there at the time was not good, and they were looking for somewhere open-minded and accepting. Canada seemed a good option. While their application was being processed, they moved to South Korea for a while, having just discovered that Mihwa was pregnant with their first child, a girl. I was sad to see them go, but we promised to stay in touch. Whenever I wanted to send them a letter, I had to find a Korean person to write the address on the envelope, because I couldn’t copy the Korean symbols accurately. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Minnette de Silva: the brilliant female architect forgotten by history (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Against all odds, the 1940s pioneer of Sri Lankan modernism become one of the world’s most famous women architects. So why are her buildings not celebrated today? The second house designed by Minnette de Silva, once one of the most famous female architects in the world, stands in Alfred House Gardens, a leafy street in Colombo, Sri Lanka, tucked away from the fumes of nearby Galle Road. Raised on columns, the house shelters within a limestone boundary wall, its iron gate patterned with leaf shapes. A yellow oleander tree and red bougainvillea spill over the gate, almost entirely obscuring the house, that was built for family friends the Pierises in 1952. Inside are De Silva’s trademark features: open courtyards and verandahs alive with trees, shrubs and a pond; a walled garden; a parking space that once doubled as a play area; and a staircase sweeping up to the second floor, where the bedrooms and kitchen are located. Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

An aquatic Santa and Mistletoe the lurcher: Friday's top photos (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you photo highlights from around the world Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Travel Photographer of the Year 2018: the winners (Thu, 13 Dec 2018)
Photographers from 142 countries submitted more than 20,000 images for this year’s TPOTY. Winning images will be displayed at a free exhibition at London Bridge City in the spring Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

A Hundred Heroines: female photographers in the spotlight (Fri, 14 Dec 2018)
Following a campaign by the Royal Photographic Society to highlight modern female photographers in a male-dominated profession, a list of a Hundred Heroines was announced on 14 December, 100 years since British women first voted in a general election Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Burgess Park: a south-east London community – in pictures (Thu, 13 Dec 2018)
In the summer Burgess Park, in London, comes alive as the diverse community gets together for barbecues, dancing, sports, and parties Max Miechowski has been exhibited at the Palm Photo Prize, Portrait of Britain and the Taylor Wessing Portrait Prize See his work on display at the theprintspace 13-21 December Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Yokozuna, controversies and a 'Dump Truck': a sumo history – in pictures (Wed, 12 Dec 2018)
The origins of sumo date back 2,000 years and it was from the 17th century that saw its rise as a spectator sport. However, viewing figures and homegrown participants have declined over the past two decades with the sport also under the spotlight due to a number of controversies including a lack of women’s access Can Sumo survive? The crossroads facing Japan’s national sport – video Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite

Steve Bell on the Tories' leadership woes – cartoon (Wed, 12 Dec 2018)
Continue reading...
>> Lire la suite