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The Guardian

Hundreds of thousands of retired Britons in EU 'may be forced to return' (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Campaigners say pensioners in countries such as Spain will have to go back to UK if they can no longer get free healthcare Hundreds of thousands of elderly Britons living in Europe may be forced to return to the UK unless the government guarantees that their healthcare will continue to be reimbursed by the NHS, campaigners for British people settled in Spain and France have warned. The House of Commons Brexit select committee was told on Wednesday that an unintended consequence of Brexit could be a surge in immigration of British migrants both working and retired. Continue reading...
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Make America great again by embracing green tech, Trump urged (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Fulfilling pledge to boost fossil fuels will mean US misses out on huge market for clean energy, experts say Leading climate change experts have urged Donald Trump not to turn his back on the biggest global challenge facing mankind, arguing that he can make America great again – and the world safer – by standing up to global warming and embracing the trillion-dollar green tech revolution. As new data showed that 2016 was the hottest year on record, scientists, government advisers and people closely involved with global climate talks said it would be self-defeating for Trump to pull the US out of the global Paris climate change deal as he has threatened. Continue reading...
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George HW Bush and wife Barbara hospitalized in Texas (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Former president was admitted to intensive care unit for respiratory problem, and his wife was hospitalized as precaution after fatigue and coughing George HW Bush was admitted to an intensive care unit on Wednesday, and his wife, Barbara, was hospitalized as a precaution, according to his spokesman. The former president was admitted to the ICU at a Houston hospital to “address an acute respirator problem stemming from pneumonia”, a family spokesman, Jim McGrath, said in a statement. McGrath said the former first lady was hospitalized as a precaution after experiencing fatigue and coughing. Continue reading...
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Over half of world's wild primate species face extinction, report reveals (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Researchers warn of approaching ‘major extinction event’ if action is not taken to protect around 300 species, including gorillas, chimps, lemurs and lorises More than half of the world’s apes, monkeys, lemurs and lorises are now threatened with extinction as agriculture and industrial activities destroy forest habitats and the animals’ populations are hit by hunting and trade. In the most bleak assessment of primates to date, conservationists found that 60% of the wild species are on course to die out, with three quarters already in steady decline. The report casts doubt on the future of about 300 primate species, including gorillas, chimps, gibbons, marmosets, tarsiers, lemurs and lorises. Continue reading...
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Scientology's UK HQ angers residents by felling trees in conservation area (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
People in St Hill Green, West Sussex brand church ‘selfish and arrogant’ after 22 trees were cut down, but spokesman says more trees have been planted The church of Scientology has angered neighbours at its UK headquarters by expanding its facilities without planning consent and felling trees in a designated area of outstanding natural beauty. Residents close to the sprawling HQ near East Grinstead in West Sussex have accused the church of “selfishly and arrogantly” carrying out “destructive development plans before authorisation” by building a coach and minibus park before securing planning permission. Continue reading...
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Gambia: tourists scramble for flights out as Senegalese troops mass at border (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
UK Foreign Office warns against all but essential travel to the Gambia after Senegal says it will act if president refuses to accept election defeat Tourists and Gambians are scrambling to leave the west African country after the Senegalese army said its forces would cross the border at midnight if long-time president Yahya Jammeh did not stand down. Amid scenes of chaos at Banjul airport where British holidaymakers were being evacuated, Col Abdou Ndiaye, a spokesman for the Senegalese army, said troops were already at the Gambian border and would enter the country if the deadline for a transfer of power passed. Continue reading...
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Home Office refuses to enforce privacy code on NHS staff using video (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Surveillance camera commissioner’s advice that trusts be required to comply with code to protect patients is rejected The government has rejected a request by the surveillance camera watchdog to allow it to monitor the increasing and unregulated use of CCTV and body-worn video cameras in hospitals. The body cameras, which record sound as well as images, are being increasingly deployed in hospitals in an effort to tackle abuse of frontline health service staff. Continue reading...
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Prepare for new surge in hate crimes against EU citizens, says EHRC (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
UK human rights watchdog says police should be prepared for backlash against EU citizens when article 50 is triggered Britain should prepare for a fresh spike in hate crimes against EU citizens when the article 50 process triggering Brexit begins, the human rights watchdog has said. David Isaac, chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC), told a hearing of MPs he was worried the start of formally leaving the bloc could cause a backlash against EU citizens, similar to the period of increased hate crime that followed the EU referendum, and was calling on police to be prepared for such an eventuality. Continue reading...
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MoD thwarts media campaign to release marine shooting video (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Court martial review adjourned over video showing Alexander Blackman murdering wounded Taliban fighter The Ministry of Defence is resisting an attempt by the Guardian and other media organisations to persuade a court to release video footage showing an incident in which a British Royal Marine shot dead a wounded Taliban fighter. Alexander Blackman is serving life for the murder of the injured man but his case has been referred to the court martial appeal court following an investigation by the Criminal Cases Review Commission. An appeal hearing is due to take place next month. Continue reading...
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GCHQ targets teenage girls to find cyber spies of the future (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Girls aged 13 to 15 invited to test tech skills in competition as part of effort to inspire more women to join fight against online crime Teenage girls are being invited to put their technology skills to the test in a competition that could unearth the cyber spies of the future. The contest has been set up by GCHQ’s new National Cyber Security Centre as part of efforts to inspire more women to join the fight against online crime. Only 10% of the global cyber workforce are female, the intelligence agency said. Continue reading...
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The west was built on racism. It's time we faced that – video (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Dead white men are revered by many as responsible for the advancement of civilisation, says sociology professor Kehinde Andrews. But, he argues, this so-called progress came at the expense of millions of people of colour. Global inequality is not an accident, he argues – it is designed to keep the hierarchy of race intact Continue reading...
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The secret of Namibia's 'fairy circles' may be explained at last (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Using computer models, ecologists think they have finally hit upon the reason for the strange polka dot patches scattered across the Namib desert The marks on the ground in the Namib desert resemble a vast sheet of polka dots, or to the less romantic observer, perhaps a bad case of chickenpox. In local myths, the bare, red circles fringed with grass are footprints of the gods, or patches of land once poisoned by the breath of a subterranean dragon. But even among scientists, who strive for more convincing theories, the curious, repetitive patterns have proved hard to explain. Continue reading...
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William Onyeabor: one of music’s most insoluble puzzles to the end (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Who was William Onyeabor? The mysterious and reclusive Nigerian synthesizer whiz, who has died aged 70, seems to have existed out of time and in a world of his own imagination William Onyeabor, the Nigerian musician who died in his sleep on Monday at the age of 70, was the recluse’s recluse. For someone like Sixto Rodriguez, subject of the documentary Searching for Sugarman, belated cult stardom was both a vindication and a second chance. But for Onyeabor, growing interest in the music he released during the 70s and 80s cut little ice. Requiring neither money nor attention, he declined to promote Who is William Onyeabor?, the 2013 compilation released on the Luaka Bop label. It says a great deal about his popularity with musicians that the mutating supergroup that toured in his place featured the likes of David Byrne, Damon Albarn, Blood Orange and Hot Chip. Thanks to fans like these, Onyeabor achieved the almost impossible: he experienced a successful comeback with his enigma intact, and without lifting a finger. Related: William Onyeabor, cult Nigerian musician, has died aged 70 Continue reading...
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How to make the perfect lemon curd (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Bring a golden glow to January with a Victorian classic, and, no matter if you’re looking to be eased into the day or hit with a full-on acid trip, there’s a variation for you A ray of sunshine in one of the darkest months of the year, lighter and zingier than marmalade (and considerably quicker to make), lemon curd is guaranteed to brighten up any breakfast or tea, as well as making a great filling for cakes. (You’re back on the cakes, right?) Formerly often known as fruit cheese (curiously, this name survives only in the sugary, dairy-free damson and quince varieties served with actual cheese), according to Laura Mason and Catherine Brown’s meticulous work The Taste of Britain, it probably started life as what the 18th-century cookbook writer Elizabeth Raffald refers to as a transparent pudding. “The thought that this mixture might be bottled and stored for later use, or even for sale, was of a piece with the industrialisation of food production in the late Victorian period.” What did the Victorians ever do for us, eh? Continue reading...
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In Europe we see only one loser from Brexit – and it won’t be us | Jean Quatremer (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Theresa May promises a soft Brexit for Britain and a hard one for everyone else. Why would we let that happen? When someone wants the impossible, in French we say that they want “the butter, the money from the butter, and the dairymaid’s smile”. In more vulgar usage we say they want something rather more from the dairymaid than a smile. This is precisely what we can take away from Theresa May’s speech on the “hard Brexit” she wants. It is “hard” only for the other 27 states but “soft” for Britain – because May wants to keep all the benefits of EU membership and concede nothing in return. That is not really a surprise since she had already announced it in October during the Conservative party conference. She even considers that any other kind of agreement would be unacceptable, because it would amount to “punishing” the British. Related: May’s Brexit focus on immigration will have catastrophic consequences | Anne Perkins Continue reading...
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Plymouth Argyle v Liverpool: FA Cup third round replay – live! (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
FA Cup third-round replay at Home Park, kick-off 7.45pm GMT Jake Jervis: ‘We’ve done the tough part in getting Liverpool here’ And feel free to email Niall or tweet @niallmcveigh 8.07pm GMT Coutinho’s corner dipped towards the near post, where Lucas raced away from his marker and headed the ball past McCormick. That’s his first Liverpool goal for a long time, and maybe his last, with Inter Milan sniffing around. 8.06pm GMT After 108 minutes of trying, Liverpool break through in the simplest of fashions. Continue reading...
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Rachael Heyhoe Flint, trailblazer for women’s sport, dies aged 77 (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• Former England women’s captain won World Cup in 1973 • Heyhoe Flint also served as director of Wolverhampton Wanderers The former England women’s cricket captain and Wolves vice-president Rachael Heyhoe Flint has died aged 77, Wolves have announced. Heyhoe Flint died early on Wednesday morning after a short illness. She was a trailblazer for women’s cricket, captaining the national side in a career spanning two decades and in which she led the side to victory in the 1973 World Cup, which she had also organised. Continue reading...
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Using footballers’ wages as an example of excess is patronising and lazy | Marina Hyde (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Top-flight football is one of the few engines of social mobility that still works and those who play to the gallery are too lazy or dim to formulate a proper argument In one sense, it is not the most enormous shock to find footballers’ pay is something on which Jeremy Corbyn disagrees with himself. A subject on which the Labour leader cannot hold two diametrically opposed opinions on the same day is increasingly a rarity. The problem with the new strategy of letting Jeremy be Jeremy is that – a bit like various football sides of cliché – you never know which one is going to turn up. Last week Corbyn declared that there should be a cap on “grotesque” salaries. And whaddayaknow – the very first example of such salaries upon which he alighted was in football. “Certainly, the salaries that are paid to some footballers are simply ridiculous,” he stated, adding: “Some of the salaries paid to very high-earning top executives of companies are utterly ridiculous.” Continue reading...
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James Ellington and Nigel Levine face career-ending injuries after crash (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• Ellington and Nigel Levine in motorbike accident in Tenerife • ‘I do not know how me or Nigel are still alive,’ posts Ellington James Ellington has said he does not know how he and Nigel Levine are still alive after the British pair were left with injuries that are likely to end their careers following a head-on collision with a car during a training camp in Tenerife. Related: David Weir ‘let down again’ as he attacks British Athletics before retiring Continue reading...
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Nick Kyrgios shows his many sides to explain defeat in Australian Open | Russell Jackson (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Australian was two sets up and coasting against the Italian veteran but another meltdown on court has left him searching for answers In answer to the first question – which was: what the hell can you do to retrieve a situation like this other than offer an earnest, pitch‑perfect mea culpa? – Nick Kyrgios had a quite predictable, wordless answer before he had sat down at his press conference on Wednesday. He rocked his head back and laughed self‑deprecatingly as a door swung open and he walked into the room. He is used to that part, and delivered a media performance to rival his fascinating on-court meltdown against the Italian veteran Andreas Seppi, from whom he took two brisk sets before shambling to a 10-8 defeat in the fifth. In both mediums he displayed virtually every one of his multiple tennis personalities. Continue reading...
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Manchester United agree Memphis Depay sale to Lyon for £14.7m (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• Holland international’s fee could rise to £21.7m with add-ons • Initial fee is half of what United paid PSV for Depay in 2015 Manchester United have agreed to sell Memphis Depay to Lyon for around €17m (£14.75m), with the fee potentially rising to €25m if a series of add-ons are triggered. United have structured the deal with the Ligue 1 club to include buy-back and sell-on clauses. Lyon qualifying for the Champions League and Depay being offered a fresh contract by the French club are among the add-ons that will raise the price for United. Continue reading...
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Dan Evans sends world No7 Marin Cilic crashing out of Australian Open (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• Briton defeats Cilic 3-6, 7-5, 6-3, 6-3 in rock-concert atmosphere • ‘I struggled early but once the sun went down I got into it,’ says Evans Dan Evans is on some sort of a roll, dismissing the former US Open champion Marin Cilic in four sublime sets to reach the third round of a grand slam for the fifth time, a record at odds with the outdated perception of him as a tearaway and underachiever. It would be a shame, however, if he were to dilute his beguiling swagger, as it is the very quality that may carry him into the second week of the Australian Open. Continue reading...
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FIA approves sale of F1 to Liberty Media with takeover expected in March (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• Private equity firm CVC will sell 35.5% share of sport • Liberty takeover expected to lead to facelift for F1 The FIA has approved the sale of Formula One’s commercial rights to Liberty Media. The American media organisation was earlier given the green light to complete its purchase of the sport at a meeting of its shareholders. The reported £6.4bn takeover has now been approved by F1’s governing body. Related: Lewis Hamilton left with a clear path to greatness at Mercedes | Giles Richards Continue reading...
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Afcon 2017: Gabon’s Aubameyang pegs back Burkino Faso but hosts rue misses (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• Group A: Gabon 1-1 Burkina Faso; Aubameyang 38pen, Nakoulma 23 • Missed chances from hosts results in second draw to put progression in doubt Gabon’s continued participation in the Africa Cup of Nations was in serious doubt after the tournament hosts were held 1-1 by Burkina Faso at the Stade de l’Amitié in Libreville, their second draw in Group A. Related: Afcon 2017 nicknames quiz: do you know the Warriors from the Pharaohs? Continue reading...
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Andy Murray shrugs off stiff ankle to beat Andrey Rublev at Australian Open (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• World No1 wins 6-3, 6-0, 6-2 and now plays Sam Querrey • Murray calls on trainer after problem with ankle in third set Andy Murray sometimes struggles to hit a convincing rhythm early in grand slam tournaments but, after a hesitant start on Monday, he goes into the third round against Sam Querrey on Friday looking as dominant as he did when stringing together 28 wins in a row on his rise to No1 in the world. He made the most of a heaven-sent opportunity against the little-known Russian teenager and world No152 Andrey Rublev, to win 6-3, 6-0, 6-2, with a slight chill lurking in the cloudless night skies after a couple of days of killing heat. Continue reading...
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Chaos at Mestalla: Valencia's journey from Champions League to utter disarray (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Peter Lim was hailed as a saviour when took over Valencia in 2014 but – seven managers later – the fans now want him out. How did it come to this? At a press conference held in a Valencia hotel two weeks ago, Jesús “Suso” García Pitarch was asked why Peter Lim had bought the city’s football team in the first place. It was a loaded question, one supporters have pondered often over the last couple of years, and the answer, or the lack of one, felt loaded as well. Pitarch, the sporting director recently back from Singapore where he had met with the owner to discuss plans for the club only to resign soon after, replied that he had never asked and had no explanation either. “I don’t know,” he said. “I suppose he likes football.” Related: Sevilla end Real Madrid's run as Sergio Ramos shows sense of theatre again Continue reading...
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Nick Kyrgios unravels in baffling Australian Open defeat to Andreas Seppi (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Australian No1 beaten by Italian in five sets 1-6, 6-7 (7-1), 6-4, 6-2, 10-8 Kyrgios squanders two-set lead in wildly fluctuating second-round match Someone carried a giant inflatable kangaroo into Hisense Arena before Nick Kyrgios squared off against Andreas Seppi on Wednesday, but the Australian punctured his own first grand slam campaign of the year with a quite astonishing display of self-destruction in Melbourne. Having been two sets up and perfectly comfortable in this match against the Italian journeyman, Kyrgios dissolved into mess of code violations and unforced errors and in doing so, turned a straightforward match-up into a five-set horror show of scarcely believable proportions. Continue reading...
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Patrick Bamford completes his £6m move to Middlesbrough (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
• Striker never made a first-team start at Chelsea • Bamford is Aitor Karanka’s second signing of window after Rudy Gestede Patrick Bamford has joined Middlesbrough on a permanent transfer from Chelsea. The striker has moved to Teeside for an undisclosed fee, thought to be £6m, signing a four-and-a-half-year deal. Bamford, who scored 19 goals on loan at Middlesbrough in 2014-15, was recalled this month by Chelsea from a loan spell at Burnley, for whom he made six appearances. Continue reading...
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The time has come for Manchester City to make a Premier League statement | Paul Wilson (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Spurs are at the Etihad Stadium on Saturday and Pep Guardiola needs the City team who overcame Arsenal to turn up not the one humbled 4-0 at Everton Less than a fortnight ago, the day after Manchester City’s 5-0 demolition of West Ham United away from home in the FA Cup, the Sun produced one of the more inspired back pages of the season in honour of the performance. “MC Hammer!” the main headline screamed, accompanied by a picture of David Silva complete with speech bubble reading: “You can’t touch this.” It all seemed completely in order. Pep Guardiola’s side had just made the most emphatic of statements to restore some of the belief that went missing in the new year fixtures, when defeat at Anfield was followed by the various controversies surrounding the narrow win against Burnley. A manager who had been sourly defensive in a television interview after the latter was now all smiles and sunny confidence, promising his side would be all the better for the luxury of a full week to prepare for their next game at Everton. Continue reading...
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More than 240 clubs now involved in football sexual abuse scandal (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Police confirm 100 extra clubs involved since last update in December, with NSPCC also referring cases from 22 other sports to police operation The number of clubs affected by British football’s historical child sexual abuse scandal has grown to 248, as the scale of the scandal continues to grow. The number of clubs – both amateur and professional – affected has risen by 100 since the last update four weeks ago, according to figures released on Wednesday by the National Police Chiefs’ Council. Continue reading...
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Bregrets? I’ve found very few. Polls show remainers are getting over it | Deborah Mattinson (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Leavers are punching the air over Brexit, and even those who voted to stay in the EU now appear to be coming to terms with the result of the referendum Speaking at events before the referendum last year, I took to asking the audience who they thought would win. Throughout, the BritainThinks poll of polls stubbornly showed remain and leave neck and neck, and in the “short campaign” more polls favoured leave than remain. But a show of hands drawn from the usual audience of business leaders, journalists and politicians consistently and confidently predicted a remain victory. One eminent commentator, often speaking on the same platforms as me, promised: “Remain will win, and will win big”. Another observed that the “great British public would look over the brink, and then vote for the status quo … as they always do”. Discussion usually focused on the inevitability of voters “seeing sense”. Continue reading...
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French presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron’s ‘anti-system’ angle is a sham | Philippe Marlière (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Youthful and ‘doubly liberal’, the former economy minister is the surprise package in the presidential race. But he’s not the outsider he’s portrayed as On several counts, Emmanuel Macron is a political oddity in the stagnant world of French politics: he is young (39), he worked in the private sector before becoming François Hollande’s economic adviser at the Elysée palace. His political rise from there was meteoric: within two years, he had been appointed minister of the economy. From an ideological viewpoint, he is also a highly unusual politician. Macron unashamedly embraces both poles of liberalism: the economic and the political/cultural ones. Related: François Fillon is as big a threat to liberal values as Marine Le Pen | Natalie Nougayrède Continue reading...
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Mark Fisher’s K-punk blogs were required reading for a generation | Simon Reynolds (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The activist writer, who has died aged 48, bridged aesthetics and politics and had struggled with depression Last week the writer Mark Fisher took his own life. His on/off struggle with depression was something he wrote about with courageous candour in articles and in his landmark book Capitalist Realism: is There No Alternative? Fisher argued that the pandemic of mental anguish that afflicts our time cannot be properly understood, or healed, if viewed as a private problem suffered by damaged individuals. Rather, it was the symptom of a heartless and hopeless politics: precarious employment and flexible work patterns, the erosion of class solidarity and its institutions such as unions, and the relentless message from mainstream political parties and media alike that “there is no alternative” to managerial capitalism. That this is as good as it gets – so deal with it. Finally the depression that Fisher, 48, had dissected acutely and fought against doggedly got the better of him. He left behind a wife and young son, a close-knit network of friends, allies, colleagues and students, and an ever-widening readership, all of whom were waiting always to hear what he had to say next. Continue reading...
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PMQs shows it’s Jeremy Corbyn, not Theresa May, who has no Brexit plan | Martin Kettle (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Riding high after her Brexit speech, May made short work of the Labour leader’s scripted performance with missed opportunities to press her on a white paper Even if Jeremy Corbyn were a much more adept parliamentary performer, today’s prime minister’s questions would have been a tough fixture. And so it proved. Theresa May arrived in the Commons off the back of a personal success in her Brexit speech yesterday. It was full of claims that may not survive contact with the other member states – it called to mind Mike Tyson’s comment that all his opponents had a plan “’till they get punched in the mouth” – but there is no denying that it was a personal success, got good press reviews and pulled her party together. Everything about May’s demeanour today was that of a prime minister with fresh authority. Continue reading...
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The Great British cake plan is no more – that’s what Brussels heard May say | Mary Dejevsky (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
After Theresa May’s speech, the EU believes Britain has finally given up on the idea of trading freedom of movement and access to the single market Not for the first time, and probably not for the last, the most colourful and combative language in response to the prime minister’s speech on Brexit came from her own foreign secretary. In response to remarks from a French presidential aide, but which also appeared to have a more generally pre-emptive purpose, Boris Johnson warned François Hollande against wanting “to administer punishment beatings to anybody who chooses to escape, in the manner of some world war two movie”. In the event, his warning – if intended as such – proved unnecessary, because when the official response to Theresa May’s address came from the European Union, everyone, including the president of the commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, seemed determined to be on best behaviour. (The fact that Johnson had been speaking during a visit to India might help to explain why his comments struck so much the wrong note.) Continue reading...
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May’s Brexit focus on immigration will have catastrophic consequences | Anne Perkins (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The EU referendum result was never about immigration. But the prime minister is determined to interpret the leave vote that way It is one of the most basic of political lessons to interpret events so that they support your argument. Theresa May has taken this workaday truth and developed it into an overarching narrative for her Brexit strategy. She is well on her way to pulling off an act of national self-harm, and in the total absence of a counter-strategy she is running away with the ball. It was there again in her Lancaster House speech yesterday, this misconstruction of the leave vote: “The message from the public before and during the referendum campaign was clear,” she told the ambassadors and hacks gathered in surroundings of gilded imperial glory: “Brexit must mean control of the number of people who come to Britain from Europe.” Continue reading...
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What I’ve witnessed in Turkey is an assault on democracy itself | Owen Jones (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Erdoğan, emboldened by the rise of Trump, is crushing fragile freedoms – tens of thousands detained and the press muzzled. The west must end its silence Democracy is a bundle of rights and freedoms wrestled from the powerful. Our rulers only surrender their power when compelled to – when the cost of resisting pressure from below becomes greater than the cost of giving ground to it. But it is naive to regard these concessions as permanent. Elites are always waiting for opportunities to seize back their power. The ideal excuse is a national crisis, contrived or otherwise, normally involving an alliance of internal and external threats, all requiring drastic measures to defeat. The authoritarian rightwing populism sweeping the Western world skilfully exploits fear to drive back the borders of democracy. Continue reading...
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Theresa May’s Brexit plan has potentially disastrous gaps in it | Keir Starmer (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The prime minister’s speech brings into question her commitment to a whole host of social, economic and workplace rights. Labour will fight to protect them In the debate about the government’s Brexit strategy, a good deal of ink has been spilt on the finer distinctions of the single market and the customs union. Related: Our panel’s verdict on Theresa May’s Brexit speech Continue reading...
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Chelsea Manning did the right thing. Finally, Barack Obama has too | Trevor Timm (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
With a stroke of his pen, the president made up for his draconian record – and, quite literally, saved this heroic whistleblower’s life There is no one who has suffered more under the US government’s crackdown on leakers and whistleblowers than Chelsea Manning. But now, after President Obama commuted her unjust 35-year jail sentence on Tuesday, she will, amazingly, soon be able to walk free. Manning, who provided journalists a historic treasure trove of documents and the public an unparalleled window into world diplomacy, will no longer have to spend the rest of her life behind bars. She will be released from prison on 17 May instead of the unconscionable 2045. It’s a cause for celebration, but also a time for reflection – not just about what she has gone through but what her case represents. Continue reading...
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The Girl Scout in me would never stand for Donald Trump | Jean Hannah Edelstein (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
An organization that instils courage, confidence and modern values in young American women should also be boycotting the president-elect’s inauguration I resigned from Girl Scouts more than 20 years ago, but yesterday I realized that the people who told me I’d always be a scout at heart were right: the news that the Girl Scouts are sending a contingent to participate in Donald Trump’s inauguration filled me with real rage. How can an organization that promises to build “girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place” send them to celebrate the ascent of a leader who would likely consider them fair game for sexual assault if they grow up to be “beautiful”? Girl Scouts is important to many girls. It was for me: a kid from a two-nationality, two-religion family, growing up in a small city in upstate New York in the mid-80s and 90s. There weren’t too many public spaces where I felt like I belonged – my family did not practice any faith. There was no community center for people like us. But my Girl Scout troops filled that gap: our weekly meetings were an all-female space where empowering girls was central. Continue reading...
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On mental health, the Tories need to put their money where their mouths are | Alastair Campbell (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
David Cameron and Theresa May have said all the right things about improving the nation’s mental health. Yet people aren’t getting the help they badly need What is it about the mental health debate that makes me go all Malcolm Tucker, effing and blinding at the gap between what politicians say about it and the reality on the ground? And why do I want everyone else to get as angry as I am about it? Because every time there is pressure on health spending, mental illness slips down the priority queue. We are frankly light years away from the parity between mental and physical healthcare that is set out – in law – in the NHS constitution. In the last week, I have spoken to a mother at her wits’ end because her daughter is being treated in Scotland when she lives 80 miles south of the border; a young man I persuaded to get help for his anxiety and depression who has been given some pills and told he might get cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in six months; a student who has dropped out of education after two failed suicide attempts, one of which followed a long wait in a crowded room waiting to see an overstretched university psychiatrist. Continue reading...
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Don’t be fooled – Theresa May’s Brexit plan won’t appease the markets for long | David Blanchflower (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The announcement that parliament will get a vote on a final deal was welcome. But the prime minister’s speech does nothing to lift the fog of uncertainty The big fear with Theresa May’s Brexit speech was that the pound would tank and that the markets would respond as negatively as they had to most of her previous utterances. The opposite happened, and it rose to $1.24, up almost 3% on the day, after it had already risen on Tuesday morning on news that inflation had reached a two-year high (it fell back a cent today). The news that the markets welcomed so warmly was that both houses of parliament would get a vote on the final deal and that May will not seek partial or associate membership of the European Union. That will prevent a bad deal, forced through by the Brexit-at-any-price Eurosceptics, which might have been on the cards without such a vote. Continue reading...
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Globalisation has made the world a better place | Jim O'Neill (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Trade has led to higher living standards in Asia and elsewhere. Are globalisation’s critics against eradicating global poverty? I was recently in beautiful Chile for a Futures Congress, and I had a chance to travel south to the very tip of Latin America. I also recently made a BBC radio documentary called Fixing Globalisation, in which I criss-crossed the UK in search of ideas for improving certain aspects of it and discussed topical issues with well-known experts. In both cases, I saw things that convinced me that it is past time for someone to come to globalisation’s defence. Chile today is Latin America’s richest country, with per capita GDP of about $23,000 – similar to that of central European countries. This is quite an achievement for a country that depends so heavily on copper production, and it sets Chile apart from many of its neighbours. Like many other countries, Chile is facing economic challenges, and its growth rate leaves something to be desired; but it also has many promising opportunities beyond its borders. Continue reading...
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May’s speech sounded like Trump. The only thing missing was the wall | Dan Roberts (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
There was something very familiar about the prime minister’s seductive mix of nostalgia, bluster and exceptionalism. And the mimicry is mutual Four times on Tuesday Theresa May promised to make Britain great again, and each one gave me goosebumps and flashbacks to covering the election of Donald Trump. Making your country great is, of course, what all politicians aspire to do. But there was something eerily familiar about the seductive combination of nostalgia, bluster and exceptionalism that the prime minister employed in her Brexit speech. Continue reading...
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Theresa May has called Sturgeon’s bluff over a second Scottish referendum | Alex Bell (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The SNP leader threatened to call another independence vote if the UK left the single market. Now she will have to follow through, or lose credibility In a period of political intimidation, time has been called on Nicola Sturgeon’s threat to hold a second Scottish independence referendum. Set aside the confusion between access to the single market and staying in parts of the custom union, as Theresa May called for in her speech on the UK’s Brexit aims, it is clear she intends to give up membership of the single market. Related: Nicola Sturgeon has marched her party to the top of the hill. Where next? | Libby Brooks Continue reading...
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Royal Albert Hall called a 'national disgrace' over members' ticket resales (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Pamphlet distributed to members who own 1,276 permanent seats offers advice on maximising resale profits on ticketing sites Royal Albert Hall members have exchanged detailed advice on how to sell their seats on ticket touting sites, prompting the venue’s former president to label its stewardship a “national disgrace”. The members, about 330 individuals who own 1,276 permanent seats in the 5,272 capacity venue, were sent a document offering tips on how to use online resale sites. The pamphlet tells members they can eschew the RAH’s official ticket return system and use controversial “secondary” ticketing sites such as Viagogo and StubHub to make more money. Continue reading...
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Calls for ex-Rolls-Royce CEO to lose knighthood after firm admits bribery (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Shadow international trade secretary says Sir John Rose ‘is not fit to hold his knighthood’ if he was aware of the actions during his reign Labour called for the former chief executive of Rolls-Royce to lose his knighthood, after the company admitted “extensive systemic bribery and corruption” during the period in which he ran the jet engines manufacturer.
Sir John Rose held the job at the Derby-based corporation, which was forced on Tuesday to admit that it was responsible for “egregious criminality over decades” between 1996 and 2011. Continue reading...
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Disability groups hail court's support for wheelchair user on bus (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Bus drivers must now pressure passengers to make room in ruling described by Doug Paulley as ‘significant cultural change’ Disability rights campaigners have hailed a ruling by the supreme court that bus drivers must try to persuade other passengers to make room for wheelchair users. Drivers may stop the bus “with a view to pressurising or shaming recalcitrant non-wheelchair users to move” if they believe a refusal is unreasonable, the judgment declared. Continue reading...
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BBC Trust says Laura Kuenssberg report on Corbyn was inaccurate (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Regulator says report on Labour leader’s views about shoot-to-kill breached impartiality and accuracy guidelines The BBC’s political editor inaccurately reported Jeremy Corbyn’s views about shoot-to-kill policies in the aftermath of the terror attacks in Paris, according to the BBC Trust. The broadcaster’s regulator concluded that a Laura Kuenssberg report for the News at Six in November 2015 breached the broadcaster’s impartiality and accuracy guidelines, in a ruling that triggered an angry response from the corporation’s director of news. Continue reading...
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Britons 'should learn Polish, Punjabi and Urdu to boost social cohesion' (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Learning community languages would aid integration, boost people’s wellbeing and be good for economy, says Cambridge academic The government is being urged to create more opportunities for British people to learn languages such as Polish, Urdu and Punjabi as a means of improving social cohesion in local communities. Recent inquiries looking into obstacles to social integration in the UK have highlighted the importance of immigrants learning English to enable them to integrate and engage fully in society. Continue reading...
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Grandparents miss out on tax credits that could boost state pension (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Little-known scheme could put thousands of pounds back into pensions of grandparents who take time off work to look after grandchildren under 12 As many as 100,000 grandparents are missing out on national insurance credits that could boost their state pension by thousands of pounds over the course of their retirement, a former minister has claimed. The former Liberal Democrat MP Steve Webb, now director of policy at mutual insurer Royal London, said a freedom of information request to HM Revenue & Customs had laid bare the “massive non-take-up” of a scheme designed to help grandparents who make sacrifices to help their children get back to work after the birth of a child. Continue reading...
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Woman arrested over teenager's death in Rotherham (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
26-year-old held on suspicion of assisting an offender in connection with death of girl named locally as Leonne Weeks A 26-year-old woman has been arrested on suspicion of assisting an offender in connection with the death of a 16-year-old girl in Rotherham. The woman’s arrest on Tuesday night came after the arrest of an 18-year-old man on suspicion of murdering the teenager, named locally as Leonne Weeks. Both remain in custody and are being questioned by police. Continue reading...
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Anthony Grainger shooting: officers were thought to be in danger (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
36-year-old victim’s hand movement was seen as threat, but inquiry investigates whether it was reaction to use of gas canister by police at the Culcheth operation A police marksman who fatally shot an unarmed man thought his colleagues were in “extreme danger” at the time, a public inquiry has heard. Anthony Grainger, 36, was shot in the chest as he sat in a car in the village of Culcheth, Cheshire, on the evening of 3 March 2012. On the second day of the inquiry into the shooting, Liverpool crown court heard testimony from some of the 16 armed officers who swooped on Grainger’s stolen red Audi. The officer who fired the fatal shot – referred to in court as Q9 – said he believed his fellow officers were in grave danger when he saw Grainger lower his right hand out of view. Continue reading...
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UK officials advised to read Trump book before seeking US trade deal (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Prof Ted Malloch, tipped to be American ambassador to EU, says The Art of the Deal reveals how president-elect’s mind works The US academic tipped to be Donald Trump’s ambassador to the EU has told British government advisers they should read the president-elect’s business book The Art of the Deal before starting trade negotiations with the US. Prof Ted Malloch, a long-time supporter of Trump who will fly out on Wednesday to attend his inauguration, is understood to have been speaking to Downing Street staff after Theresa May’s speech on leaving the EU. Continue reading...
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Link cash machines may start charging because of row about network fees (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Some financial firms using network want to reduce fees they pay to allow charge-free withdrawals from most of 70,000 ATMs Thousands of Link cash machines could start charging for withdrawals as a result of a row about fees among members of the ATM network. The dispute centres on a move by some of the financial firms which use the Link network to reduce the fees they pay to allow their customers to withdraw cash from most of Link’s 70,000 cash machines across the UK. Continue reading...
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Books world alarmed by Pearson's sale of stake in Penguin Random House (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Management have moved to reassure staff and writers that selling the 47% holding will not affect business, but authors and agents express unease Authors and staff have reacted cautiously to news that Pearson is to sell its stake in Penguin Random House (PRH), the world’s biggest publisher and home to some of the most successful brands in books, among them Fifty Shades of Grey, Jamie Oliver and The Girl on the Train. PRH moved quickly to address fears among staff that the sale of the 47% share to German-owned Bertelsmann would affect jobs. In a statement, global chief executive Markus Dohle promised it would be “business as usual for us”. He added: “Both Pearson and Bertelsmann continue to be very supportive of our strategy and our success, and both have been valued shareholders for us.” Continue reading...
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Tunisia tour operators 'wanted improved security before Sousse attack' (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Tui representative tells UK inquest firm was aware of raised terror risk in area but did not want to alarm tourists with ‘army of police’ Tour operators wanted to increase security at a Tunisian resort before 38 people were killed in a terrorist attack there but were concerned that tourists would be frightened if they saw “an army of police”, an inquest has heard. The hearing into the deaths of 30 Britons in Sousse in June 2015 was told that the idea of increasing police security and how it could make tourists feel “uncomfortable” was discussed at official meetings a month before the attack. Continue reading...
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EE fined £2.7m for overcharging customers (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
UK’s biggest mobile phone company has been unable to identify all the users who were billed inaccurately Mobile phone company EE has been fined £2.7m by Ofcom for overcharging tens of thousands of customers. EE is owned by telecoms giant BT, which acquired the mobile operator last year in a £12.5bn deal. Continue reading...
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Southern rail to run full train service from Tuesday (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Company announces restoration of normal timetable after Aslef calls off three strikes next week and overtime ban is lifted Southern will restore a full train service from next Tuesday after industrial action by drivers was suspended.
The company said it would not be possible to reintroduce a full timetable before then because work rosters were issued before Aslef called off three strikes next week and lifted an overtime ban.
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UK labour market shows signs of slowing (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Fewer people are in work and wage growth has slowed, latest figures show Britain’s labour market showed signs of slowing in November as the number of people in work declined and wage growth slowed for the first time since August. The number of people in employment fell by 9,000 to 31.8 million while month-on-month wage growth, including bonuses, dropped from 2.9% to 2.8%. Continue reading...
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Mali suicide bomber kills at least 50 people in Gao military camp (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Attack marks significant setback for peace efforts in region after vehicle explosion hits joint operational mechanism base A suicide bomber in a vehicle full of explosives has attacked a camp in northern Mali, killing at least 50 people and wounding dozens of soldiers and former fighters. Related: The struggle for Mali | Jack Watling and Paul Raymond Continue reading...
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Somalia urged to enforce law on sexual offences after gang rape of 16-year-old (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Women’s groups demand perpetrators of brutal attack are brought to justice after video footage is posted on social media, sparking widespread condemnation The gang rape of a 16-year-old girl in Somalia, which sparked outrage after a video of the alleged incident was posted on social media, will be the first substantial test of a law aimed at tackling pervasive sexual violence in the country. Women’s groups have urged the authorities to enforce legislation passed last year in Puntland, the semi-autonomous region of Somalia where the rape took place. The law, launched in November and hailed as a vital step towards lasting change, criminalises all sexual offences for the first time. Continue reading...
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Teenager opens fire in Mexico school, injuring four before killing himself (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Teacher and two students hospitalized for head wounds Monterrey school’s surveillance footage apparently posted to social media A 15-year-old student opened fire at a private school in the northern Mexican city of Monterrey on Wednesday, hitting a teacher and two other students in the head before killing himself. Another student suffered lesser injuries in the shootings, which were captured on a chilling video posted to social media. Nuevo León state governor Jaime Rodríguez said the shooter died at a hospital and that the other three victims with head wounds were “fighting between life and death”. The boy wounded in the arm was out of danger. Continue reading...
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Dakota Access pipeline activists say police have used 'excessive' force (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Firsthand accounts from Native Americans along with live footage suggest that police deployed ‘less than lethal’ weapons against unarmed people North Dakota law enforcement and the national guard have responded to the latest Standing Rock demonstrations with an aggressive show of force, according to indigenous activists who fear that police violence will escalate after Donald Trump’s inauguration. Related: Standing Rock activists eye pipeline finances to cement Dakota Access win Continue reading...
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Second winner of environmental prize killed months after Berta Cáceres death (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Goldman prize winner Isidro Baldenegro López, who was known for his activism against illegal logging, was shot dead months after Berta Cáceres was murdered A Mexican indigenous activist who received the prestigious Goldman environmental prize for his crusade against illegal logging has been shot dead, the second award-winner to have been murdered in less than 12 months. Isidro Baldenegro López, a subsistence farmer and leader of the Tarahumara community in the country’s northern Sierra Madre mountain region, was shot at a relative’s home on Sunday. Continue reading...
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Obama to leave office with more than 40 detainees still in Guantánamo Bay (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
A final handful of detainees will be relocated to new lives overseas but the facility will not be closed, a vow that was once a key aspect of Obama’s legacy Over the next 48 hours, US military cargo planes will deposit a handful of detainees from Guantánamo Bay to new lives overseas for what is likely to be the final time for at least four years. Barack Obama will leave office with either 41 or 42 men still detained at Guantánamo, the Guardian has learned, as his plan to close the infamous detention facility falls short. Continue reading...
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Iraq has retaken east Mosul from Isis, says army general (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Lt Gen Talib Shaghati says government troops are in ‘full control’ of eastern part of Iraq’s second largest city Iraqi government troops say they are in “full control” of east Mosul three months into a major operation to recapture the country’s second city, despite some Islamic State fighters remaining along the Tigris river. Related: The battle for Mosul in maps Continue reading...
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Middle classes in crisis, IMF's Christine Lagarde tells Davos 2017 (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
IMF head wins support from outgoing US vice-president Joe Biden as she uses American term for working people in demanding action over rising inequality The head of the International Monetary Fund, Christine Lagarde, has called for urgent action to tackle a “middle-class crisis” hitting working people as she warned that inequality, distrust and a lack of hope were fuelling growing populism. Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Lagarde said she had first highlighted the dangers of rising inequality four years ago but had been ignored. “I hope people will listen now,” she said. Continue reading...
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AfD politician says Germany should stop atoning for Nazi crimes (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Björn Höcke sparks fury by calling for tradition to end and labelling Holocaust memorial a ‘monument of shame’ A politician from the rightwing populist Alternative for Germany (AfD) party has broken with the country’s postwar political consensus by calling for a “180-degree turn” from the tradition of remembering and atoning for the Nazi era. In a speech in a beer hall in Dresden, Björn Höcke, who leads the party in the eastern state of Thuringia, railed against Germany’s decade-long tradition of acknowledging the crimes of the National Socialist era, describing the Holocaust memorial in Berlin as a “monument of shame”. Continue reading...
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Police officer and Bedouin killed in home demolition clashes (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Officials and residents offer conflicting accounts of incident, which followed pre-dawn raid in village of Umm al-Hiran A controversial Israeli police operation to demolish buildings in a Bedouin village in the country’s south to make way for a new Jewish town has ended with two fatalities – including an Israeli police officer – amid sharply conflicting versions of what occurred. The pre-dawn raid by hundreds of armed police on the village of Umm al-Hiran in Negev – regarded as illegal by the Israeli courts – ended with a Bedouin man shot dead in his car and a police officer fatally run over. Continue reading...
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Senators call for investigation of Tom Price's healthcare investments (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Democrats raise concern over health secretary nominee, who bought and sold health-related stocks while he was an influential voice on healthcare policy Donald Trump’s choice for health secretary, Tom Price, faces his first congressional grilling on Wednesday, hours after leading Democrats called for an investigation of the congressman’s investments. Price bought and sold health-related stocks while he was an influential voice on healthcare policy in the House of Representatives, advocating for and against bills that affected health companies’ fortunes. Continue reading...
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Germany denies rebuffing Theresa May over citizens' rights deal (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Angela Merkel’s spokeswoman says all EU 27 states agree there can be no negotiations before article 50 is triggered Germany has denied it rebuffed an attempt by Theresa May to seal an early deal on citizens’ rights post-Brexit, and reiterated that there was “complete unanimity” among the EU’s 27 member states that the subject could only be discussed once Britain had triggered article 50. Related: 'Europe's fate is in our hands': Angela Merkel's defiant reply to Trump Continue reading...
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Egyptian judge gives four people suspended sentences over FGM death (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Mayar Mohamed Moussa, 17, died last year after her mother took her to a private hospital for the procedure Egyptian experts have criticised lenient sentencing in what is only the country’s second ever prosecution for female genital mutilation (FGM) procedure. The four accused were given suspended prison sentences and fines following the death of 17-year-old Mayar Mohamed Moussa after undergoing FGM. Related: First doctor convicted of FGM death in Egypt only spent three months in jail Continue reading...
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Edward Snowden's leave to remain in Russia extended for three years (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Former US intelligence contractor’s Russian lawyer also says Snowden can apply for country’s citizenship from next year Edward Snowden’s leave to remain in Russia has been extended for three years, his lawyer has said, as a Russian official said the whistleblower would not be extradited to the US even if relations improved under the incoming president, Donald Trump. Related: Intelligence experts urge Obama to end Edward Snowden's 'untenable exile' Continue reading...
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Saudi Arabia to continue ban on 'immoral, atheistic' cinema (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The head of the country’s religious authority has said that legalising cinemas and concerts would ‘open doors to evil’ Proposals to reopen cinemas in Saudi Arabia have been strongly dismissed by the current head of the country’s religious authority. “Motion pictures may broadcast shameless, immoral, atheistic or rotten films,” said the grand mufti, Sheikh Abdulaziz al-Sheikh, on his weekly television programme. Continue reading...
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What is the 'global gag rule', and why does Trump support it? – video (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
This US aid policy, rescinded by Obama, is likely to be brought back by Trump. Campaigners say it will endanger the lives and health of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable women by denying access to life-saving family planning, sexual and reproductive health and HIV services and putting them at risk of unsafe abortion Continue reading...
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Why have I given up my New Year's resolutions? - video (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Many of us start January determined to go to the gym every day or give up the burgers. But it’s hard to keep that ‘New Year, new you’ attitude, no matter how good our intentions are. Could the evolution of our brains explain why resolutions are so hard to keep? Continue reading...
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The legacy of Barack Obama, in seven drawings – video (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
It is not easy to measure the impact of Barack Obama’s eight years as president of the United States. But here are seven numbers that illustrate what he did – for better and for worse – during his time in the White House Obama’s legacy: the promises, shortcomings and fights to come Continue reading...
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Who is Chelsea Manning? – video profile (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Whistleblower Chelsea Manning will be released from military prison in May after her sentence for leaking classified information was commuted by the outgoing US president Barack Obama. As an intelligence analyst in Iraq, Manning leaked hundreds of thousands of documents via the anti-secrecy organisation WikiLeaks. Continue reading...
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The new retirement: why we are covering this issue – video (lun., 16 janv. 2017)
Senior reporter Amelia Hill explains why she is focusing on the changing nature of retirement in a new, nine-part weekly series and asks for you to get involved. As Britain’s population gets older, society faces both challenges and opportunities. We consider what they might be for the retirees of today – and those of the future Continue reading...
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Nick Clegg: 'I warned Cameron his Brexit strategy was failing' – video (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Former deputy prime minister and Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg tells Owen Jones that as the EU referendum approached its climax, he told the then prime minister David Cameron he needed to deliver a more emotional message to combat the powerful Brexit slogan of ‘take back control’ Watch an extended version of this interview on Owen Jones’s YouTube channel Continue reading...
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Meet Solo, the 'emotional radio' that plays music to suit your mood – video (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Imagine a machine that can evaluate your frame of mind and select music accordingly. Design and innovation studio Uniform has developed such a machine – Solo, the ‘emotional radio’. Combining facial recognition technology with Spotify, it selects a track to suit your emotional state. Solo’s developers tell Dr Hannah Fry how artificial intelligence technology could soon move beyond data-driven applications Continue reading...
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Ryan Gosling on La La Land: 'The world is quick to shame you for trying' – video interview (ven., 13 janv. 2017)
Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone, the stars of multi-award winning movie La La Land, speak about why the musical tends to flourish in times of real-life bleakness, the dangers of dreaming too much and why today’s climate is tougher for wanabees than ever before • La La Land is now on release in the UK Continue reading...
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Counting with the Count, Sesame Street's most famous vampire – video (dim., 15 janv. 2017)
Numbers are always fun, especially when you get to count with The Count! We catch up with number enthusiast Count Von Count to talk about his lovers and moving to Sesame Street from Transylvania Continue reading...
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Al-Nusra hostage: 'extremism in Syria will not disappear' – video (ven., 13 janv. 2017)
Theo Padnos, an American journalist, was captured in Syria by the formerly al-Qaida affiliated Jabhat al-Nusra in 2012. He tells the Guardian’s Owen Jones about his time in captivity, the physical and psychological torture he endured and his eventual release. Padnos says he believes western military intervention in Syria would only fuel support for groups like al-Nusra and Isis, and puts his views about Donald Trump in power An extended version of this video is available on Owen Jones’s YouTube channel Continue reading...
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Libor scandal: the bankers who fixed the world’s most important number | Liam Vaughan and Gavin Finch (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
With arrogant disregard for the rules, traders colluded for years to rig Libor, the banks’ lending rate. But after the crash, the regulators were on their trail At the Tokyo headquarters of the Swiss bank UBS, in the middle of a deserted trading floor, Tom Hayes sat rapt before a bank of eight computer screens. Collar askew, pale features pinched, blond hair mussed from a habit of pulling at it when he was deep in thought, the British trader was even more dishevelled than usual. It was 15 September 2008, and it looked, in Hayes’s mind, like the end of the world. Hayes had been woken up at dawn in his apartment by a call from his boss, telling him to get to the office immediately. In New York, Lehman Brothers was hurtling towards bankruptcy. At his desk, Hayes watched the world processing the news and panicking. As each market opened, it became a sea of flashing red as investors frantically dumped their holdings. In moments like this, Hayes entered an almost unconscious state, rapidly processing the tide of information before him and calculating the best escape route. Continue reading...
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Can Trump really make America great again? (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
In a Pennsylvania county with a proud industrial past, why did voters who were loyal to Obama turn towards Trump – and what do they expect now? Donald Trump’s face made it official. As his presidential victory was declared, the upper 32 stories of the Empire State Building, which for election night had been turned into a giant news screen, flickered, wept light, and revealed his portrait. “The 45th president,” it said. Continue reading...
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After hours: capturing the journey home from New York City's gay nightclubs (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Richard Renaldi has spent years photographing LGBT clubbers in Manhattan as a way of understanding his own troubled youth as a gay man In the summer of 1992, in the early hours of a Sunday morning, Richard Renaldi and his boyfriend Eric left The Sound Factory, the celebrated nightclub on Manhattan’s 27th Street, to walk home through Chelsea, on the west side of Manhattan. As they walked through the city, the pair was approached by an older man named Larry. Larry, they discovered, would leave his Staten Island home in the early hours of Sunday morning and travel to Chelsea. There, he would silently watch gay men as they left New York’s world-famous nightclubs. Continue reading...
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Sebastiano: the forgotten Renaissance genius who swapped sex for God (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The National Gallery is pairing Michelangelo with the lesser-known Sebastiano in its latest exhibition. So who is this artist who gave up debauched Venice for the Vatican – and why did he waste his talent? The names are not quite equal in fame. This spring the National Gallery is putting on an exhibition called Michelangelo and Sebastiano. You may have heard of Michelangelo. He carved David, painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and did a few other things. In Paolo Sorrentino’s brilliant TV drama The Young Pope, a copy of his Last Judgement formed a sinister backdrop to Jude Law’s pontifical pronouncements; Michelangelo is a god of art. But who is Sebastiano, and why has he got a joint exhibition with one of the greatest artists who ever lived? He is Sebastiano del Piombo (about 1485-1547), the great nearly-man of the Italian High Renaissance. He was almost one of the very greatest Venetian painters, then moved to Rome where was he was overshadowed by Raphael and dominated by Michelangelo. Perhaps personal modesty held him back; perhaps he was not quite driven enough to compete in an age of intense artistic individualism. Yet his paintings offer tantalising evidence of true genius. Continue reading...
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Iraq's Marsh Arabs test the waters as wetlands ruined by Saddam are reborn (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
In the country’s southern marshes, the government is helping families to rebuild their floating communities, 25 years after the land was drained The morning of 20 January 1992 began much like any other for the Mohammed family in the marshlands of southern Iraq. Rising at first light, they roused their herd of buffaloes and drove the beasts snorting and protesting into the surrounding wetlands to graze. After a quick breakfast of bread and yoghurt, washed down with sugary tea, they readied themselves for a long day out on the water. But on that day, one of the coldest on record, five-year-old Hanaa and her mother caught no fish and gathered no reeds. No sooner had they paddled past the last of their neighbours’ floating reed houses than a squadron of government fighter jets emerged from the mist, guns blazing. They reduced the artificial islets to embers, and killed many of the buffaloes. Not content with shooting up a few villages as punishment for locals’ alleged harbouring of defeated Shia rebels, Saddam Hussein soon dispatched his engineers to divert the Tigris and Euphrates rivers away from the marshes. The effects were disastrous. By the turn of the last century, the Middle East’s largest wetlands had withered from a peak of 20,000 sq km to almost nothing. Continue reading...
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Istanbul by Bettany Hughes review – a colourful, life-filled history (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Istanbul, not Constantinople (or Byzantium) … this tale of three cities in one brims with romance and verve For those who enjoy historical parallels, there was something particularly irresistible about the news in 2013 that the world’s deepest underwater railway tunnel linking Europe and Asia through the Bosphorus had opened beneath Istanbul. The record-breaking continental connection recalled Herodotus’s description, two-and-a-half millennia earlier, of the Persian emperor Darius I ordering the construction of a mile-long pontoon bridge across the water sometime around 513BC, the first literary reference to the city and an act of imperial hubris that would, inevitably, result in the nemesis of the Persian wars and defeat at the hands of the Greeks. It is difficult to imagine the Turkish prime minister being gripped by such parallels. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, a former mayor of Istanbul, instead made disparaging comments about the long delays to the tunnel caused by “clay pots” and “other stuff”, such stuff including the largest remains of a Byzantine fleet ever discovered, among other important archaeological findings. The modern Islamist is not generally known for his interest in non-Islamic history. Continue reading...
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Rae Sremmurd review – no standing still with party-hard rappers (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London Their song Black Beatles soundtracked the Mannequin Challenge meme, but it’s impossible not to bounce along with the social media-savvy duo – until the moment they order the crowd to freeze The success of their song Black Beatles means that rap duo Rae Sremmurd’s story will be forever linked to the viral #MannequinChallenge phenomenon. However, the young brothers from Tupelo, Mississippi have more in their arsenal than the average internet-propelled star. Anyone here looking purely to revisit the highs they experienced by standing still for Twitter last December won’t fail to notice similar hook-filled singles like Throw Some Mo and No Type, both of which get huge responses tonight. Playing the first of two London shows on their European tour, brothers Swae Lee and Slim Jxmmi don’t get off to the best of starts as they arrive on stage an hour later than the advertised time of 9pm. It’s perhaps a touch ironic, then, that they begin with Start a Party and its key lyric: “This is how you start a party right.” Continue reading...
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Balenciaga sitting pretty with work ethic inspiration at Paris show (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Demna Gvasalia plays with proportions of clothes in surprising ways in trademark that recalls work of house’s founder To understand the philosophy of Balenciaga’s artistic director, Demna Gvasalia – the coolest designer in fashion right now – one should probably start by looking at the seating at his shows. Related: Demna Gvasalia reinvigorates Balenciaga with strategic disrespect Continue reading...
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'The swamp is Goldman Sachs': how the bank is rewarded for putting profits over people (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The US government has continually mined the bank for some of its top posts despite its role in the 2008 financial crisis – and protests are popping up across the country again in response to Donald Trump’s cabinet picks In a persistent drizzle on 17 January, a group of protesters swathed in green ponchos unfurled tarps and sleeping bags on the sidewalk in front of Goldman Sachs’ high-rise building on the West Side highway in New York City. A few of them wore handmade swamp creature masks; others bore signs with the swamp creatures on them. A light-board sign declared the bank “Government Sachs”. The protest was the beginning of a multi-day camp-out aiming to stay on the sidewalk outside the investment bank until the inauguration of Donald Trump, and to bring people affected by the bank’s policies to the doorstep of some of the world’s richest people – some of whom will belong to the Trump administration. Continue reading...
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Pod save America: 12 podcasts to get you through the Trump presidency (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
From soul-searching Democrats to the king of rightwing radio, here are the pods to help you understand the new world order – and perhaps the next eight years The week after the 2016 US presidential election, the podosphere was full of black Americans expressing their fears for the future, diehard Democrats wondering what went wrong and rightwingers telling us what they had known all along. Listen widely enough – left, right and “alt-right” – and you get a true state of the nation address right in your earbuds. Here are a few of the political podcasts that will make you laugh, cry or hurl things at the wall – but above all, live through the next four years or more. Continue reading...
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How a design competition changed the US approach to disaster response (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Nate Berg tells the story of Rebuild By Design, a competition – and now its own organisation – based on taking a more proactive approach to disaster response in cities; but how far can you prepare for the effects of climate change? Ten years ago, New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg released a plan to create what he called “the first environmentally sustainable 21st-century city”. The blueprint, known as PlaNYC and released on Earth Day, outlined more than 100 projects and policies to create that sustainable city by 2030. It set a precedent for local action on climate change; cities around the world began drafting their own sustainability plans. But then in October 2012, it got a harsh reality check. Continue reading...
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There's trouble with transparency in the UK's academies (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Developing good relationships with business is essential for academies, but critics say the system is plagued by secrecy and conflicts of interest On the surface, everything looked perfectly normal. In the summer of 2015, Perry Beeches academy in Birmingham hired a local business to undertake a health and safety audit. By the end of autumn, it had paid £5,000 to Lampsato Ltd, run by a woman called Lynda Scotson.
But there was a catch: Scotson happened to be the wife of one of the school’s directors. He had been on the committee that approved the contract. Continue reading...
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Tories in awe of their Maybot as comedic Corbyn falls flat | John Crace (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Conservative MPs toe the line as they rally behind their leader, leaving Labour looking more confused and bereft than ever There was only sweetness and light on the Conservative benches. It was as if the divisions of the past six months had never happened, as the Eurosceptics joined ranks with the Europhiles to praise the brilliance of the prime minister’s Lancaster House speech. Anna Soubry, normally Theresa May’s bête noire, could only marvel at the clarity and leadership the prime minister had provided and just hoped that she could write down her 12 objectives so parliament could venerate them as holy relics. Alistair Burt, another erstwhile troublemaker, was overwhelmed by how constructive the speech had been and prayed that God would grant her even more constructiveness in the months and years ahead. Continue reading...
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The Novel of the Century by David Bellos review – the story of Les Misérables (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Victor Hugo was paid a fortune for his masterpiece about the poor. This biography of one of the world’s most read novels is rich in extraordinary detail Victor Hugo, born in 1802 in the garrison town of Besançon, belonged to the first generation to write about the French Revolution of 1789 without personally remembering it. The son of a general in Napoleon Bonaparte’s army, and a precociously talented poet, Hugo left school soon after his father’s fortunes collapsed alongside Napoleon’s, following the battle of Waterloo in 1815. By the time he was 39, he was already one of 40 “immortals” in the Académie Française, and in 1845 he was made a pair de France or “lord of the realm”. David Bellos has written a biography not of Hugo, but of his masterpiece, Les Misérables. Putting recent literary scholarship into narrative form, Bellos traces the life of the 1,500-page novel from conception to publication, mentioning along the way the many film and musical adaptations of Les Misérables that have given it a rich life beyond the printed page. Continue reading...
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America's oldest Muslim families on the Trump presidency: 'This can't deter us' (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Muslims whose families have been in the country as long as Trump’s own relatives voice hope – and trepidation – as the inauguration approaches When Alyssa Haughwout heard the news that Donald Trump had become the president-elect of the United States, her first thought was about the century-old mosque she cares for. “I’m not really worried, knock on wood,” said the 31-year-old native of Brooklyn and third-generation American of Lipka Tatar descent. “But when Trump got elected, my first thought was: ‘We should get a security camera. We don’t have a video in the front. Let’s just do that.’” The community has since started the process of upgrading its security system. Continue reading...
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People power in Puerto Rico: how a canal community escaped gentrification (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
How do you improve a neighbourhood without causing land prices to rise? Residents along a polluted waterway in San Juan set up a community land trust to help save their homes, as well as the environment For years a graffiti message has appeared throughout San Juan, Puerto Rico’s capital, as an urgent demand: Dragado ya! (meaning “dredging now!”). Even passersby who have never set foot in the eight barrios making up the Caño Martín Peña community – a large informal settlement along 3.75 miles of canal in the central city – know the message points to the dire need to dredge the waterway, which has become so clogged with refuse that those driving by with the windows down can immediately smell the stagnant waters. Continue reading...
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The Panama chef using rainforest ingredients to transform fine dining (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Chef Mario Castrellón is using ingredients native to the region in his fine dining menus, making sure they’re sustainably sourced from indigenous farmers Leer este artículo en español From forest to table: fine dining gets an indigenous twist – in pictures At a fine dining restaurant in Panama City, customers are tucking into kalalu, a tropical fern with an earthy flavour, blanched like an asparagus, and brushed with olive oil and grilled. Next on the menu; boda, a palm flower that looks and tastes like baby corn, pickled and wrapped in banana leaf tamale-style. From wild red rice grown in the isolated Darién province, to the flor eléctrica herb on the slopes of the country’s tallest volcano, unusual rainforest plants are a critical part of the menu for 33-year-old Panamanian chef and restaurateur Mario Castrellón. His restaurant Maito has undertaken the mission of exploring Panamanian biodiversity, while also bringing indigenous and traditional ingredients to the fine dining scene. While Panama City’s most popular restaurants were serving Italian pastas and Peruvian ceviches, Castrellón has been incorporating pixbae, a starchy peach palm fruit, and ñame, a root vegetable, into his menu at Maito. Continue reading...
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Kitchen gadgets review: My Ice Cream Maker – yes, mine and not yours (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
With its labelled cups, this is ideal if you want everyone to remember who owns the dessert Countertop churn, with motorised paddles and insulated cups. Discourages crystalline build up in iced-dessert mix. Continue reading...
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Bold over: 10 of the best printed dresses – in pictures (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
From star prints and multi-prints to florals and camo, if you like a dress with a big, bold or bright print then you’re in luck: they are everywhere. Here are 10 of the best Continue reading...
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Why don’t I enjoy life? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Anouchka Grose (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries I’d like to begin by shelving the obvious, contemporary answer to the question “Why don’t I enjoy life?”: “Because you have a chemical imbalance in your brain, which can be fixed with medication.” I wouldn’t want to put anyone off doing anything that might help their suffering, but this answer needs to stop being so pushy and get to the back of the queue: there are plenty of perfectly valid reasons for not enjoying life. Related: How would the Stoics cope today? | Ryan Holiday Continue reading...
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Time to cash in: spend your paper £5 notes now (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
From May, your old money won’t be legal tender and may not be accepted in shops. Here’s what to do if you are stuck with some You may be hanging on to your rumpled old fivers out of affection for a simpler time when you didn’t have to worry about the meat content of your wallet. But that time is up, folks. You must spend those retro paper £5 notes now or, come May, face the kind of shame usually reserved for those who try to spend Scottish notes south of the border. On Friday 5 May, your fiver collection won’t be worth the paper it is printed on, as the notes will cease to be legal tender. From then on, retailers and banks need only accept or swap old notes at their potentially sarcasm-heavy discretion. Continue reading...
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Homes in which to sit out the perils of 2017 – in pictures (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Why not hunker in a bunker as the world winds to an end Continue reading...
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Southern rail: could more commuters claim a credit card refund? (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
One passenger recovered half his season ticket cost from Amex. We examine the chances of others following him Season ticket holders on strike-hit train lines could be in line for thousands of pounds in compensation after one commuter successfully claimed £2,400 back from his credit card company. The regular commuter on Southern trains, known only as “Sean”, applied to American Express for a 50% refund claiming non-delivery of the service. But how did he manage it, and does this mean that thousands of other commuters can do the same? Continue reading...
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The best gym wear for all ages – in pictures (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Anyone who thinks gym wear should be filed under ‘any old thing’ is stuck firmly in 2010: what you wear to exercise is now as subject to fashion’s whims as any other kind of clothing. Prints are an easy way to make a statement during your warm-up stretches, be they all over (Yasmin’s palm print outfit and Michele’s neon, apres-ski look), or in moderation (the blue paint splotches on Pam’s leggings). Alternatively, go for the off-duty dancer look: see Alice’s cap and running top with hoodie round the waist, or Saul’s bra top and high-waisted leggings. It’s the perfect balancing act between practical and fashionable. Melanie Wilkinson Continue reading...
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Rachel Roddy’s recipe for pasta with broccoli and sausage | A kitchen in Rome (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
A cold snap in Rome has given the broccoli frostbite, but it’s still perfect for the pot. Tossed into some pasta with sausage meat, chilli and wine, it makes a savoury bowlful that’s certain to please Brocco means “shoot” or “small protuberance”, and broccoli is the diminutive plural: little shoots. A member of the large and botanically puzzling brassica family, broccoli – like cauliflower – is a sort of cabbage that has started to flower, but then stopped growing while still in bud. These buds cluster together, in multiple fractal heads in the case of romanesco, which makes this extraordinary green vegetable sound even more like a band from the 1980s. As the name suggests, broccoli was developed in Italy, during the Roman Empire, and introduced to other European countries in the early 1700s. In her Vegetable book, Jane Grigson suggests it was a garden designer called Stephen Switzer who did most to popularise broccoli in England. He also ran a seed business for which he had a pamphlet printed to advise customers how to grow and cook “foreign kitchen vegetables” such as fennel, cardoons, celeriac and “sprout colli-flower” (broccoli). The best broccoli seeds, he noted, came from the coast of Naples and other Italian places. Now is the season for broccoli: the familiar dark-green, tree-like Sicilian or Calabrese variety, lime-green fractal romanesco, and sprouting broccoletti, which are actually turnip tops. Or, rather, it was the time for broccoli, up until the moment Rome and other Italian places were struck by uncharacteristic frost. Overnight temperatures dropped, the cascading water in Bernini’s fountain turned to icicles, my neighbour downstairs pulled out her moon-boots and, near the sea-coast of Naples, my vegetable man Filippo’s land was besieged by frost. On Wednesday morning, his stall was like a jigsaw with half its pieces missing. “Guarda,” he said, pinching his cigarette between his lips and telling me to look as he picked up a stem of broccoli, the tip of its fleshy stem frozen to translucent. He was lucky, having some crops semi-buried and others shaded by trees, he still had produce to bring to Testaccio market. Others were not so lucky. A few miles outside Rome, my friend Carla Tomasi and her now quietly famous garden were similarly stuck, artichokes with their great plumes of silvery leaves, fennel and brassicas all frozen until crisp, the ice forever changing their structure. “I could weep,” she wrote in a message, but then finished by saying: “at least I have lemons.” Continue reading...
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Top 10 Paris jazz clubs – chosen by musicians and experts (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Paris has always had a strong affinity with jazz, and there’s a wealth of venues to hear trad, modern and avant garde music. Here, performers, producers and critics pick their favourite clubs Paris has swung to the rhythms of jazz for nigh on a century. With legends Bud Powell, Chet Baker and Miles Davis woven deep in its history, and pioneers Django Reinhardt and Stéphane Grappelli providing the backdrop to its cafe society, jazz is as much a part of the capital’s cultural heritage as art, philosophy and literature. Yet jazz in Paris is no sepia-tinted relic: it remains a flourishing art form that packs out bars, clubs and caverns. With a profusion of styles on offer (from trad, modern and avant garde to bossa nova, jazz-funk and Afro-jazz, not forgetting France’s singular contribution to the genre – gypsy jazz), its freedom-loving soul lives on. And the more experimental among the city’s contemporary players are lifting its appeal to new heights. Continue reading...
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Courgette crisis: why the vegetable shortage will hit clean-eaters hardest (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Cold weather in Italy and Spain – as well as a rise in the popularity of spiralised courgetti – is sending prices soaring and leaving supermarket shelves empty Name: Courgettes. AKA: Zucchini, summer squash, baby marrow. Continue reading...
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Sign up to The Flyer: weekly travel inspiration, emailed direct to you (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
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Four experimental mobile features to try on inauguration day (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Be one of the first to try live video notifications on mobile as Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States As part of our mission, the Guardian Mobile Innovation Lab experiments with new ways of telling stories on small screens. On inauguration day, be a part of our experimental group to try out new mobile live blog features and notifications. We’ll be testing four features on three platforms. These experimental features will supplement the Guardian’s overall coverage of the inauguration of Donald Trump as president of the United States on Friday 20 January.
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Has being a stay-at-home dad affected your career? Share your stories (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
With a rise in ‘latte papas’ and community dad groups, we want to hear your experiences of being a stay-at-home father From the rise of “latte papas” – dads who juggle coffee and infants – to stay-at-home dad groups, the number of fathers who choose to be the primary caregiver for their kids has quadrupled since 1989, according to a study by the Pew Research Center. The proportion of men who want an active parenting role is also increasing: the 2017 Modern Families Index found that nearly half of working fathers want to downshift to a less stressful job to help with childcare, and just over a third would be willing to take a pay cut to achieve a better work-life balance. Those figures were higher for younger fathers – indicating a shift in mentality. Continue reading...
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Are you being affected by the political situation in the Gambia? (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Tourists are being evacuated from the Gambia, due to the deteriorating political situation. If you’re in the country you can share your experiences with us Thomas Cook is to fly almost 1,000 UK customers out of the Gambia, as the UK Foreign Office (FCO) advises against all but essential travel to the country. The country’s political situation has been deteriorating since incumbent president Yahya Jammeh refused to hand power to Adama Barrow, who won in last month’s elections. The Gambia’s parliament extended president Yahya Jammeh’s term by 90 days on Wednesday, but regional leaders have threatened to use military force if he refuses to cede power. Continue reading...
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What are your experiences of NHS maternity services? (mer., 04 janv. 2017)
We would like to hear your experiences on the maternity ward before and after giving birth. Share your stories of treatment to help us report on the NHS A new report suggesting women in labour are left feeling frightened and unsafe due to a shortage of midwives comes soon after it was reported one in four babies born in the UK are not receiving mandatory checkups from health visitors during the first two years of their life. Related: UK midwife shortage leaves women feeling like cattle, report finds Continue reading...
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NHS crisis: have you had an operation cancelled this winter? (jeu., 12 janv. 2017)
The NHS have cancelled hundreds of urgent operations this winter and new reports indicate even cancer patients have been affected. Share your stories Dozens of hospitals in England have had to declare a black alert – the highest form of emergency status – this week after becoming so overcrowded that they could no longer guarantee patient safety and provide their full range of normal services. Related: NHS crisis: 20 hospitals declare black alert as patient safety no longer assured Continue reading...
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'At best delusional': readers react to Theresa May's Brexit speech (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Guardian readers gave a mixed reaction to a speech setting out government’s objectives for negotiations with the EU An alternative to May’s Brexit speech – by Guardian readers Theresa May has outlined the government’s 12 priorities for Brexit negotiations with the EU. In a pitch that envisioned a “truly global Britain”, May said that “what I am proposing cannot mean membership of the single market”, as well as confirming that parliament would vote on a Brexit deal. May also said that “no deal for Britain is better than a bad deal for Britain.” Related: Prime minister vows to put final Brexit deal before parliament Continue reading...
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What Trump means for trade – and for Britain | Letters (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Simon Jenkins (We’ve lost a saint. But a sinner may make a better president, 12 January) makes some good points about Obama’s mixed legacy. But he fails to acknowledge the big difference between Trump’s forthcoming presidency and the one Obama has had to endure, especially during his last term. Unlike Obama – who despite his failings was shackled by an unprecedentedly destructive and obstructive Republican majority in both houses – Trump, with the prospect of an even bigger majority behind him, is likely to find it relatively easy to shoe-in all manner of regressive legislation (aided further by a supine supreme court, once he fills that vacant seat). Lee Robinson London • There is a more puzzling conundrum than the potential success of a sinner over a saint. Recently, I listened to Bloomberg financial analysts on the fallout from “desired” US job repatriations. They chose Apple’s iPhone as an example. Unit production cost of an iPhone with Chinese labour:  $4. Estimated cost using US labour: $40. Estimated cost using fully automated factories: 0.75 cents. (Foxconn already has such a factory in Asia). Conclusion: repatriation of production using old forms of labour is a no-brainer. Continue reading...
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'It's not just banter, it puts you on edge': readers on harassment while running (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
More than 60% of women feel anxious when out running on their own, according to a new survey. Readers share their experiences What do you do if you experience unwanted attention while out running on your own? Many women try to ignore it, while others confront their catcallers. A survey of 2,000 women found a third had experienced some form of sexual harassment while running on their own. The poll, commissioned by England Athletics, also showed half of them feared for their personal safety. Continue reading...
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Afcon 2017 nicknames quiz: do you know the Warriors from the Pharaohs? (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Who are the reigning champions: the Elephants, the Wild Beasts or the Horrors? • Quiz: how much do you know about the Africa Cup of Nations? What is Algeria's nickname? The Mediterranean Knights The Desert Warriors The Saharan Socceroos The All-go Algerians What is Ghana's nickname? The Bends The Black Stars The Falling Skies The Satellites What is Cameroon's nickname? Irrepressible Eagles Indestructible Birds Inimitable Cheetahs Indomitable Lions What is Uganda's nickname? Trains Cranes Planes Automobiles What is Egypt's nickname? The Daddies The Pharaohs The Mummies The Nilers What is Zimbabwe's nickname? The Warriors The Rogues The Baseball Furies The Punks What is Morocco's nickname? Lions of the Atlas Cheetahs of the Andes Tigers of Tibesti Leopards of the Rockies What is Ivory Coast's nickname? The Elephants The Wild Beasts The Horrors Warpaint What is Gabon's nickname? The Panthers The Falcons and Parrots Kilimanjaro Stars The Red Devils What is Burkino Faso's nickname? The Stallions The Squirrels The Swallows The Oneders Continue reading...
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Britain's courgette shortage: have you spotted any of the elusive veg? (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
As Britain struggles through a debilitating lack of courgettes, we want your photos of the lesser-spotted vegetable January is a month of healthy eating intentions, and what could be more healthy than the humble courgette. But a continental cold snap has led to a shortage of the versatile vegetable, beloved by choppers and spiralisers alike. Related: What a pickle: UK gripped by courgette shortage Continue reading...
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Giving rights to robots is a dangerous idea | Letters (lun., 16 janv. 2017)
The EU’s legal affairs committee is walking blindfold into a swamp if it thinks that “electronic personhood” will protect society from developments in AI (Give robots ‘personhood’, say EU committee, 13 January). The analogy with corporate personhood is unfortunate, as this has not protected society in general, but allowed owners of companies to further their own interests – witness the example of the Citizens United movement in the US, where corporate personhood has been used as a tool for companies to interfere in the electoral process, on the basis that a corporation has the same right to free speech as a biological human being. Electronic personhood will protect the interests of a few, at the expense of the many. As soon as rules of robotic personhood are published, the creators of AI devices will “adjust” their machines to take the fullest advantage of this opportunity – not because these people are evil but because that is part of the logic of any commercial activity. Continue reading...
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Tell us what retirement means to you (lun., 16 janv. 2017)
Guardian journalist Amelia Hill will be travelling across Britain to find out your concerns and hopes for retirement – and she wants your help along the way With nearly one in seven Britons over 75 by 2040, according to a report by the Resolution foundation thinktank, Guardian senior reporter Amelia Hill will be travelling across Britain to investigate the changing nature of retirement, and how it affects you - from your hopes and fears to your plans and experiences. This project, which we’re calling The new retirement, is part of an experiment in collaborative reporting. Amelia is interested in what you think – and invites you to contribute to, guide and help shape this series as it considers the wider challenges of an ageing population and a younger generation struggling to save for retirement. Continue reading...
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An alternative to May's Brexit speech – by Guardian readers (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
We asked our readers what they would prefer to hear in May’s speech outlining her EU negotiation objectives Theresa May outlines her Brexit objectives in a speech at Lancaster House on Tuesday, in which she is expected to confirm that Britain will be leaving the EU’s single market. Related: Theresa May to confirm UK exit from EU single market Continue reading...
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NHS crisis: 'My frail mum was forced to wait on the floor for eight hours' (sam., 14 janv. 2017)
Reports of overcrowding, long waits and cancelled operations have led to claims that the NHS faces a ‘humanitarian crisis’. Here, patients tell their stories Dozens of hospitals in England have had to declare a black alert – a status that means its emergency care facilities and beds are under extreme pressure – this week after becoming so overcrowded that they could no longer guarantee patient safety. It follows a warning from the British Red Cross that the NHS is facing a “humanitarian crisis” this winter, claims that have been denied by Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary. We asked for your stories of the health service over the past few weeks. Here are a few of the responses we received: Continue reading...
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My beautiful commute: share pictures of your journeys to work (lun., 16 janv. 2017)
Whether it’s the sun rising behind a railway bridge or a frosty street scene, you can share your commuting pictures with us It may be cold and dark on the daily journey to and from work, but early mornings and dusky evenings can be lovely at this time of year. Trees against a dawn sky, a view down the Thames at twilight or a frosty field through a train window, we’re looking for pictures of your beautiful commute. Share your photos and videos with us and we’ll feature a selection of our favourites on the Guardian site. Be sure to tell us where you’ve taken the picture and why you like it. Continue reading...
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Carry that weight: readers' photos on the theme of heavy (sam., 14 janv. 2017)
For last week’s photography assignment in the Observer New Review we asked you to share your photos on the theme of heavy via GuardianWitness. Here’s a selection of our favourites Share your photos on this week’s theme ‘reflect’ by clicking the button below Continue reading...
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Should I use a career development agency to steer my path? (lun., 16 janv. 2017)
I’m out of work and at a crossroads, so am wondering if going to one would help find my next job Twice a week we publish problems that will feature in a forthcoming Dear Jeremy advice column in the Saturday Guardian so that readers can offer their own advice and suggestions. We then print the best of your comments alongside Jeremy’s own insights. I recently lost my job as a senior manager in manufacturing. I have vast experience in facilities management but it is 10 years out of date. Now that I am nearer 50 I feel I am a jack of all trades and master of none. Continue reading...
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Snow across the UK – your photos (ven., 13 janv. 2017)
Blizzards and high winds have caused disruption across Britain – but there were also peaceful scenes and opportunities for fun Continue reading...
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Readers recommend: share your 1980s 12-inch singles and remixes (jeu., 12 janv. 2017)
Make your nomination in the comments and a reader will pick the best eligible tracks for a playlist next week – you have until Monday 16 January A tricky topic hoping to unearth some gold from your record libraries this week – for more on what we’re looking for, read on ... Related: Vinyl destination: who is actually buying records? Continue reading...
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How to contact the Guardian securely (lun., 19 sept. 2016)
Technical options for people who want to get in touch with journalists in a way that protects both security and anonymity Some of the most important stories published by the Guardian have come from whistleblowers. Their disclosures have been vital in exposing stories of huge public interest, sometimes with global ramifications. Our pledge is to protect our sources ‐ and not to disclose their identities, or our communications with them, unless their approval has been given. If you want to get in touch with us in a way that protects your security and anonymity, there are a number of technical options that may help – although, of course, none of them can be 100% guaranteed. Continue reading...
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Joe Biden brought laughs, gaffes and authenticity to White House (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The vice-president will leave office with a favorable image and a reputation as authentic, a rare attribute for a politician, let alone a longtime establishment one On a sunny October day in 2015, Joe Biden held a news conference in the White House Rose Garden. With the president by his side, he announced that he would not run for president, a decision that seemingly closed the door on a lifelong ambition. But then Donald Trump won the election and sent the Democratic party careening into a dark period of uncertainty with no obvious leader. In that void, Biden has revisited the possibility. Continue reading...
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Lionel Richie to produce Sammy Davis Jr biopic (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Based on a memoir from 1965, the production will involve all of the late singer’s heirs after years of legal disputes A biopic of the singer Sammy Davis Jr is finally heading to the big screen after years of legal disputes. According to Deadline, the film will be based on the 1965 memoir Yes I Can: The Story Of Sammy Davis Jr, co-penned by Davis and his wife Jane, as well as the author Burt Boyar. The heirs to his estate will join producers Lorenzo di Bonaventura, Mike Menchel and Lionel Richie. Bonaventura’s credits include the Transformers franchise. Continue reading...
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NFL denies Lady Gaga is banned from mentioning Donald Trump at Super Bowl (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Claims that showcase half-time show faces a politics gag dismissed as false by both football authorities and singer’s management Rumours that Lady Gaga would be blocked from speaking out about politics or Donald Trump during her forthcoming Super Bowl half-time show have been denied by the NFL. On Tuesday, it was reported that the NFL told the pop star she could not “say anything or bring anything up about the election, or mention Donald Trump”. Continue reading...
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Feeling Rotten: the meaning of Theresa May's Vivienne Westwood suit (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Theresa May’s tartan Westwood is her lucky suit. She wore it to launch her leadership bid and now she’s wearing it to confirm Brexit. But is it on-message? So here we are. Johnny Rotten, scourge of the establishment, is influencing the wardrobe choices of pro-establishment prime minister, Theresa May. Usually, beneath the political tension, it’s the shoes that betray May’s agenda. But heading to Lancaster House to set out her 12-point agenda yesterday, she diverted us with her familiar Black Watch Vivienne Westwood suit, a two-piece that is fast becoming her trademark look for delivering a blow to the political landscape. Political commentators have called it her “lucky suit”. Punk fans, however, will note it’s a very similar model to the one Johnny Rotten used to collect fan spit on stage in 1977. Continue reading...
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John Cummings obituary (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Labour MP schooled in the trade union movement, industrial militancy and local government John Cummings, who has died aged 73, was one of an increasingly rare breed of Labour MPs schooled in the trade union movement, in industrial militancy and in local government, and whose roots propelled them, not always enthusiastically, into a later life in parliament. Unimpressed by political careerists, disdainful of sections of the London metropolitan left and deeply uncomfortable with New Labour, John was “real” Labour, even if he shied away from apparently easy epithets. This extended to his choice of newspapers: he religiously took the Daily Telegraph, claiming that he needed to read it “to find out what the enemy are up to”. Continue reading...
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Ousmane Sow obituary (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Senegalese sculptor who captured the energy of people resisting oppression Ousmane Sow, who has died aged 81, devoted himself to sculpture full time only from 1978. That was when he returned for good to his native Senegal from France, where he had learnt much about anatomy through working as a physiotherapist. He went on to gain an international reputation from using traditional techniques to produce distinctive larger-than-life figures. Sow’s breakthrough came with his Nuba series, seven single pieces and five double ones, mostly of male wrestlers but with two female figures. The series was prompted by books of photographs of the Nuba people of southern Sudan taken by the German filmmaker Leni Riefenstahl, and was first shown outside the French cultural centre in Dakar, the Senegalese capital (1987). He adopted the same approach with the Maasai of Kenya and Tanzania, the Zulus of South Africa, and the nomadic Fulani of west Africa (including Senegal). His work was exhibited in France; at the Documenta art festival in Kassel, Germany (1992); and at the Venice Biennale (1995). Continue reading...
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Live-shooting with Woody Harrelson at 2am: 'There's something about the terror of it I love' (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
In 2002, the star ended up in jail after being chased through London by police. Now he’s turning that wild night into a single-take movie starring Owen Wilson and Willie Nelson to be beamed live into cinemas. What could possibly go wrong? It is almost midnight on Monday evening and Woody Harrelson is showing me around the set for his directorial debut, Lost in London. An unused building in the centre of the capital has been commandeered to house assorted locations including a club with burlesque trimmings where gold statues dangle from the ceiling and a police station complete with cells and interview rooms. There’s just one problem: Harrelson doesn’t seem to know where he is. “Hold on,” he mumbles. “I lost track of what floor we’re on. Where’s the …?” His bleariness has always been a considerable part of his charm: that sleepy Texan drawl, that quizzical gaze, half-amazed and half-sceptical. But padding around in tracksuit bottoms and a fleece, his eyes faintly bloodshot, the 55-year-old actor looks positively somnambulant. He smiles as he recognises his cinematographer, Nigel Willoughby. “Nigel, where’s the room where I get booked by the cops?” An affectionate chuckle: “Next floor up, Woody.” Continue reading...
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Gene Cernan obituary (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
American astronaut who was the last human being to walk on the moon At 1.54pm on 11 December 1972, Gene Cernan piloted Challenger, Apollo 17’s lunar module, into the Taurus-Littrow valley, near the Sea of Serenity, on the surface of the moon. In later years Cernan, who has died aged 82, would describe the valley where he had landed accompanied by the geologist Jack Schmitt as “our own private little Camelot”. Three days later, having travelled to such locations as the Sculptured Hills, and the Van Serg and Sherlock craters, the astronauts prepared to leave. Cernan marked out his daughter Teresa’s initials in the dust, where they remain. Before climbing back into the lunar module, he paused and spoke to Mission Control back in Houston: “As we leave the moon at Taurus-Littrow, we leave as we came, and, God willing, as we shall return, with peace and hope for all mankind.” Continue reading...
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Margaret Barry: wild Irish woman of the British folk scene (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Discovered on a street corner by Alan Lomax, the ‘queen of the Gypsies’ was an untamed talent who outdrank Brendan Behan, insulted Bob Dylan, and filled the Royal Albert Hall. The author of a new show tells her story Bob Dylan called her his favourite folk singer. Christy Moore says she still inspires him. Norma Waterson likens her to Edith Piaf and Bessie Smith. Sir David Attenborough put her on live TV. And even Van Morrison stops being grumpy to talk animatedly of “a great soul singer” when her name is mentioned. A hundred years since her birth in Cork, the legend of Irish street singer Margaret Barry continues to grow. From her early days busking during some of Ireland’s most troubled years, she went on to become a revered attraction in London pubs where the Irish labourers who’d migrated after the war to help rebuild Britain’s capital congregated after work for a few jars of stout and a flavour of home. At a time when Irish traditional music might have been heading for extinction – a victim of state and church disapproval – exiled musicians kept the flame burning, resulting in a vibrant Irish scene in the English capital, coalescing around pubs such as the Favourite on the Holloway Road and the Bedford Arms in Camden. The uncompromising voice and raucous banjo of Margaret Barry were at its formidable heart. Continue reading...
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Zadie Smith and Michael Chabon nominated for book critics award (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Margaret Atwood also set to receive a lifetime achievement prize at this year’s National Book Critics Circle awards Ann Patchett, Michael Chabon and Zadie Smith are among the nominees for the National Book Critics Circle awards in the US. Books by Louise Erdrich and the former US poet laureate Robert Pinsky were also among 30 finalists in six categories (autobiography, biography, fiction, nonfiction, poetry and criticism) selected by the organisation yesterday. Continue reading...
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Best photos of the day: Berlin fashion and camo trousers (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including the Sportalm show in Berlin and outfits for Mexican migrants Continue reading...
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Mind maps: the beauty of brain cells – in pictures (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The 19th-century Spanish scientist Santiago Ramón y Cajal, the father of modern neuroscience, was one of the first people to unravel the mysteries of the structure of the brain – and he made stunning drawings to describe and explain his discoveries Continue reading...
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Snow sweeps across Europe – in pictures (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
A cold wave across Europe affected many countries bringing low temperatures and snowfalls in many countries where its not a regular occurrence Continue reading...
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Steve Bell on a UK-US trade deal – cartoon (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
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Confined: artwork from Indigenous prisoners in Victoria – in pictures (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
An exhibition showcasing art from Indigenous Australians in or recently released from Victorian prisons opens today in Melbourne. Now in its eighth year, the annual Confined exhibition is presented by prisoner support organisation The Torch as part of St Kilda’s Indigenous Arts festival, Yalukit Wilum Ngargee. This year, it features artworks by 130 artists developed through The Torch’s Indigenous Arts in Prisons and Community program • Confined 8 is showing at the Gallery, St Kilda town hall, until 15 February • Another Day in Paradise review – a raw, emotional insight into Bali Nine artist’s life on death row Continue reading...
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Kenya's slum ballet school – in pictures (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
The Kibera ballet school is part of the Anno’s Africa and www.onefineday.org projects working in slum areas in Kenya. Weekly ballet classes are held by the teacher and former dancer Mike Wamaya. In collaboration with a ballet studio in Karen, an upperclass area in Nairobi, young dancers are given the opportunity to be part of productions at the city’s national theatre Continue reading...
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Eyewitness: Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh (mer., 18 janv. 2017)
Photographs from the Eyewitness series Continue reading...
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Steve Bell on Donald Trump’s interview with Michael Gove – cartoon (lun., 16 janv. 2017)
US president-elect promises swift post-Brexit trade deal with UK in his first interview with the European media Continue reading...
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Great moments from past presidential inaugurations – in pictures (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
As Donald Trump prepares to become the 45th president of the United States, we take a look back at some of the best moments from previous inaugurations Continue reading...
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Obama's White House, by official photographer Pete Souza - in pictures (mar., 17 janv. 2017)
Pete Souza, formerly the official photographer for Ronald Reagan, was the official White House photographer for President Barack Obama. As the US awaits the inauguration of Donald Trump, Souza looks back at some of his favourite images from the last eight years All photographs by Pete Souza for The White House Continue reading...
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