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The Guardian

Fracking protesters walk free after court quashes 'excessive' sentences (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Cheering supporters greet activists at prison gates after sentences are overturned Three protesters jailed for blocking access to a fracking site walked free on Wednesday after the court of appeal quashed their sentences, calling them “manifestly excessive”. The activists, Simon Blevins, 26, Richard Roberts, 36, and Rich Loizou, 31, had been jailed after a four-week trial led to their convictions for causing a public nuisance for a protest at Cuadrilla’s Preston New Road site in Lancashire. Continue reading...
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NHS urged to improve response to Grenfell toxicity concerns (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Prof Anna Stec has called for screening of survivors and firefighters to monitor and treat potential health risk The NHS is falling short in its response to the Grenfell fire and needs to undertake more comprehensive health screening for survivors, local residents and firefighters, according to an expert studying potential contamination around the tower. Prof Anna Stec said saliva, urine and blood samples should be collected from all three groups to ensure people do not develop health problems caused by toxicants released during the fire. Continue reading...
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'Very good progress' on Brexit, May says at Brussels summit (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
PM says deal can be achieved ‘by working closely’, before making case to EU leaders Theresa May has said “very good progress” has been made on Brexit since the ill-tempered Salzburg summit last month, as she arrived in Brussels for talks with EU leaders and urged both sides to work “intensively” in the coming days. The prime minister shrugged off the setbacks of last weekend and gave a defiantly upbeat assessment of the outlook for a deal after a brief meeting with the EU commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker. Continue reading...
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US denies giving Saudis 'benefit of doubt' over Jamal Khashoggi case (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Secretary of state says US will take commercial ties into account in deciding response The US secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, has denied giving the Saudi regime the “benefit of the doubt” over the disappearance of Jamal Khashoggi and claimed that the Turkish president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, was satisfied with Saudi cooperation in the investigation. But Pompeo made clear that the Trump administration would take commercial ties and Saudi cooperation in the attempted isolation of Iran into consideration when formulating a response to Khashoggi’s disappearance and reported murder. Continue reading...
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Universal credit: Labour loses bid to force release of impact analysis (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
MPs reject call to publish assessments as Tories rally to defend controversial policy The government has defeated a Labour attempt in the Commons to force the release of its analysis about the impact of universal credit, in a sign of renewed Conservative unity in defending the much-criticised policy. The “humble address” motion by Labour, which sought access to briefings or analyses showing the effect on claimants’ incomes and debt levels, was defeated by 299 votes to 279, after four hours of debate. Continue reading...
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Man on retrial for murder of Brighton schoolgirls play-acted grief, court told (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Russell Bishop was acquitted in 1987 of killing Nicola Fellows and Karen Hadaway A convicted sex offender on trial for the second time for the murders of two nine-year-old girls in the 1980s was play-acting when he appeared grief-stricken following the discovery of their bodies, a court has heard. Russell Bishop, who joined a search party with his dog Misty after Nicola Fellows and Karen Hadaway went missing, described details of the position of their bodies that he could only have known as their killer, jurors were told. Continue reading...
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No retrial for teacher accused of having sex with pupil on plane (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Jury foreman says ‘no realistic prospect’ of reaching majority verdicts on Eleanor Wilson A teacher who was accused of having sex with a 16-year-old pupil in a plane toilet as they returned from a school trip will not face a retrial. Jurors at Bristol crown court failed to agree a verdict last week in the trial of Eleanor Wilson, 29, who had been accused of beckoning the boy into the cubicle during the night flight and having sexual intercourse with him. Continue reading...
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Norway apologises to women punished for relationships with German soldiers (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
‘German girls’ were subject to reprisals after 1945 for relations with the soldiers Norway’s government has officially apologised to Norwegian women targeted for reprisals by the authorities for having relationships with members of the German occupying forces during the second world war. Between 30,000 to 50,000 Norwegians, labelled “German girls”, had sexual relations with German soldiers during the occupation, according to conservative estimates from Norway’s Centre for Holocaust and Minorities Studies. Continue reading...
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US treasury official charged with leaking Trump-Russia information to reporter (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Natalie Mayflower Sours Edwards is accused of disclosing reports on figures such as Paul Manafort to BuzzFeed News A US Treasury department official has been arrested and charged with leaking information relating to the Trump-Russia investigation to a journalist. Natalie Mayflower Sours Edwards is accused of disclosing reports over the past year on suspicious financial activity by figures including Paul Manafort, Donald Trump’s former campaign chairman. Continue reading...
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Holiday firm sued over death of woman locked in cupboard in Wales (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Son of Elizabeth Isherwood seeking compensation from Macdonald Resorts The son of a woman who died from hypothermia when she became locked in an airing cupboard at her holiday apartment is suing the resort company that runs the complex. Elizabeth Isherwood, a former police officer, fought to free herself after a door knob broke. Continue reading...
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Chinese city 'plans to launch artificial moon to replace streetlights' (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
‘Dusk-like glow’ of proposed satellite could light an area with a diameter of 10-80km, People’s Daily reports In Chengdu, there is reportedly an ambitious plan afoot for replacing the city’s streetlights: boosting the glow of the real moon with that of a more powerful fake one. The south-western Chinese city plans to launch an illumination satellite in 2020. According to an account in the People’s Daily, the artificial moon is “designed to complement the moon at night”, though it would be eight times as bright. Continue reading...
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'It’s nice to feel I’m solvent. That’s a huge gift': Anna Burns on her life-changing Booker win (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The author was in terrible pain and couldn’t afford to feed herself when she wrote her novel Milkman. She talks about growing up during the Troubles – and her ‘dreamlike’ success Winning the Man Booker prize is clearly a life-changing event, but never more so than in the case of Tuesday night’s surprise success, Anna Burns, who became the first Northern Irish writer to win the £50,000 award for her third novel, Milkman. Go back four years and Burns was unable to write for excruciating back pain, living peripatetically around England, house-sitting when possible, struggling to make ends meet and using food banks (which she thanks in the acknowledgments of the book). When she was finally able to send the manuscript to her agent, it was turned down by several publishers. What an end to the story. “I was thinking that when I got back to the hotel last night,” the 56-year-old author says when we meet. In good Booker tradition, she has only had a couple of hours’ sleep. “When I look back to 2014 – with this horrendous pain, wondering: ‘Will I even finish Milkman?’ And then Booker winner? The extremes … It feels wonderful, it feels dreamlike. Did that really happen?” Continue reading...
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Sweet Jeremy rides to Brexit-broken Theresa's rescue | John Crace (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The PM found no friend in sight. Then she looked across the dispatch box and relaxed Theresa May checked her reflection in the mirror. No love lost there. She still hated herself. Hated the person she had become, hated the job she was doing. When she had first become prime minister, she had felt almost complete. But now she was little more than a hollowed-out shell, almost unrecognisable even to herself. Brexit had poisoned her from within. She knew it was a terrible mistake – she had always known that – and everything she touched now turned to dust around her. She wasn’t even making the best of a bad job. She was doing a bad job badly. Most mornings she would lie under the duvet, willing time to stand still. She carried on merely because it was less humiliating than not carrying on. Stubbornness disguised as a misplaced sense of duty. Continue reading...
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On a high: Canada celebrates cannabis being legalised (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Trudeau completes election pledge with an end to a century of prohibition Marijuana legalisation explained: key facts about Canada’s new laws At five seconds past midnight, Ian Power became the owner of the first gram of recreational cannabis to be sold in Canada. After waiting for hours in the cold, Power strode excitedly into the only cannabis store open in St. John’s, Newfoundland and made his purchase. “I think it’s one of the biggest moments of my life,” he told the crowd of reporters gathered to witness the transaction at the Tweed store. “There’s a tear in my eye. No more back alleys.” Power said he intended to frame his purchase rather than smoke it. Continue reading...
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How to get rid of an unwanted housemate (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The Ecuadorians are fed up with their longtime lodger, Julian Assange. But many of us have had a nightmare flatmate. Here’s how to get them to leave So it seems the people at the Ecuadorian embassy in London have had it with Julian Assange loitering around their pad, after it was revealed he has been told to take better care of his cat and clean his bathroom. In a gloriously petty move, they have even limited his wi-fi usage. Genius. We have all been there, right? Any of us who have survived the second year of uni knows the horror of the wrong roommate. I mean, you could just ask them to leave, but it is way more fun, in my experience, to make life so unbearable that they are convinced they are going of their own volition. So here is a handy, five-step plan to removing an unwanted housemate. Continue reading...
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What other unsexy dances might Seann Walsh and Katya Jones perform? (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The Strictly snog duo defused all sexual tension with a gender-neutral jiggle – and they could have more not-so-dirty dances up their sequinned sleeves ‘It’s a problem,” says Arthur Murray’s lead UK franchisee, Rio El-Asir. “We have a strict policy that fraternisation of teacher and student is prohibited. People send their daughters here, their wives – so we have to be just like doctors. Students fall for the teachers usually.” Nature finds a way. Tens of hours of staring into each other’s eyes while grinding each other’s hips clearly triggered something for Strictly pair Seann Walsh and Katya Jones. On Saturday, they came fourth with their first post-kissing scandal “dance of shame”. Nearly 12 million tuned in – the highest audience of the series so far – to see them do the gender-neutral jiggle of a charleston. Next week, they plan to do the quickstep. As some have already noted, it is another deliberately unsexy choice for a pair now doomed to entertain us. Continue reading...
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Are republicans allowed to be interested in Meghan Markle’s pregnancy? (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The announcement from the Duke and Duchess of Sussex has triggered a royal soap opera of petty squabbling and appalling behaviour. Bring it on I am a Guardian reader with republican principles. Does this mean I can’t take an interest in the current royal shenanigans? Daria, by email Hell, no! Just as being empowered currently means whatever a woman wants it to (“I love Instagramming photos of my boobs because it totally empowers me!!!!”), then the inclusive, equality-minded Guardian must be inclusive of those who love a royal soap opera. So buckle up, principled readers, I’m about to get all Hello! on your principled arses. Continue reading...
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Why are Bono, Pharrell and Michael Stipe paying tribute to this woman's dead cat? (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
An all-star memorial album for Souris the cat is the latest project from French artist Sophie Calle Name: Souris the cat. Age: Dead since 2014. Continue reading...
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'No goodbye at the end of phone calls': readers on things only done in movies (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Following on from our examples of things people only do in the movies, we’ve put together a selection of your suggestions They don’t say goodbye at the end of phone calls in films or even wrap them up in any kind of way which I actually like. They just hang up after the main part of the conversation is done. I started doing this but people just called me back to ask if my signal had cut out. GhostWiper Continue reading...
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Has the time come for remainers to compromise? | Martin Kettle (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
While the focus has been on how Tory backbenchers will vote on a Brexit deal, pro-Europeans on the opposition benches will face a crucial dilemma too For politicians, compromise can be a surprisingly hard word. So it is today over the Brexit endgame. The talk is still of crashing out, no deals and blood red lines. But this is paradoxical. Politics, like life itself, is mostly built on compromises. That is why the Brexit sherpas are, in fact, still talking in Brussels and London. Even on Brexit, it remains likelier than not that the practical human instinct to compromise will eventually have its way. This is not, though, the certainty it ought logically to be. Brexit is not simply another political process to be settled through compromise. To many, it is also a series of absolutes. One is that Britain’s vote to leave the European Union was not just decisive but the immutable will of an entire people that cannot be questioned – or compromised. A second, never properly understood in Westminster, is that the EU sees leaving as a treaty process governed by rules that cannot be bent. Continue reading...
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Steve Bell on Donald Trump's defence of the Saudi regime – cartoon (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
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The Guardian view on the Gender Recognition Act: where rights collide | Editorial (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
It should be possible to advance trans equality without harming the interests of women. But a toxic debate has made it harder Since 2004 trans people in the UK have been able to legally change their gender with a gender recognition certificate. The Gender Recognition Act became the first law in the world allowing someone to change gender without surgery. Since then countries including Ireland and Denmark have passed laws that allow people to “self-declare” their gender, rather than seeking approval from a panel of experts. Last year the Scottish government held a consultation with a view to following suit. This Friday the UK government’s consultation on the same issue comes to an end. The debate has become toxic, with trans rights activists and some feminist campaigners taking opposing sides. The Guardian rejects the idea that one of these positions is the right one – and the other wrong. Important questions of personal identity are at stake, but also legal rights and protections. (The rights of trans men are far less controversial because they do not, while transitioning, gain access to spaces designed to protect a disadvantaged group.) While campaigners for trans rights are entitled to push for laws that they believe advance equality, feminists are entitled to question whether such changes could adversely affect other women. Neither group is a homogeneous bloc and there are more than two points of view. Continue reading...
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Fascists are like vampires. Let them in at your peril | Zoe Williams (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
At first, inviting them on to chatshows and the pages of tabloids seemed like mischievous fun. But now they are glorying in the limelight – and hard to destroy Fascism is interesting in its “creep” stage, where you have a hint of what you’re looking at, but you’re not quite sure, and you keep turning it over for historical marks, like the Antiques Roadshow of the Coming Apocalypse. But not in its “march” stage, when antisemitism and Islamophobia are in the open, misogyny is basking under the studio lights, and white nationalism takes its democratically mandated place in ancient parliaments. Intellectually speaking, that’s very boring; the arguments are tedious, even if emotionally it’s as epic and engrossing as watching your house burn down. Don’t beat yourself up, this is timeless: Marie Curie would not win a debate with Steve Bannon about whether she should carry on doing science or go back to the kitchen; Sigmund Freud would not win an argument against Nigel Farage over whether the psychoanalyst was exerting undue influence because HE WAS A JEW. Authoritarians delight in the weakness of their case; if they can be that wrong, and still prevail, they get to prove how strong they are and besmirch the principles of truth and respect at the same time, so it’s win-win. Continue reading...
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The fracking protesters did us a public service. Jailing them was wrong | Michael Segalov (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The court of appeal protected the right to protest. If Theresa May persists with this disastrous policy, expect far more direct action There were cheers inside court four of the Royal Courts of Justice this afternoon, when after a markedly short recess three appeal court judges returned to give their verdict. Sentenced to lengthy jail sentences last month, three-anti-fracking protesters - Simon Blevins, Richard Roberts, Rich Loizou - had what they had known all along confirmed by the lord chief justice, Sir Ian Burnett: the punishments handed down by the judge in their trial had been “manifestly excessive”. Instead of serving 15 or 16 months in HMP Preston, their release from prison is now imminent. But be in no doubt: they should never have been behind bars in the first place. Related: Court quashes fracking protesters' 'excessive' jail sentences Continue reading...
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Blair, Clegg and Heseltine: why we need another EU referendum | Tony Blair, Nick Clegg and Michael Heseltine (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
As leaders from different political traditions in Britain, we are united in defending shared European values It would be an understatement to say that the negotiations to take Britain out of the European Union have not gone well. For all the promises made during the referendum, the advocates of leaving the EU both underestimated the fundamental importance of Britain’s integration into the European-wide economy and failed to explain the sacrifices that Brexit inevitably involves. Continue reading...
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Sri Lanka v England: third ODI – live! (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Over-by-over updates from the third ODI in Kandy Pakistan v Australia: Abbas takes five to leave hosts lagging Drop Nick an email or tweet him @NickMiller79 6.52pm BST 16th over (of 21): England 127-3 (Morgan 43, Stokes 27) - target 151 Four singles then a nicely-run two from the over. England should have this wrapped up shortly. 6.49pm BST 15th over (of 21): England 121-3 (Morgan 41 Stokes 23) - target 151 Pradeep replaces Malinga, and starts by nailing Stokes in the elbow with a short ball. That’ll sting. He gets the credit for the run though, oddly. Another single, then Stokes plays an extraordinary ramp shot, skipping around the crease before flicking the ball high over his head, high over the keeper and high over the boundary for six. What a shot! Continue reading...
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Wembley will not be sold by the FA after Shahid Khan withdraws offer (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
• Fulham owner pulls out of proposed deal to buy stadium • FA says stadium will stay under its ownership The Football Association’s proposed £600m sale of Wembley stadium to Shahid Khan has been unexpectedly cancelled after the owner of Fulham football club and the Jacksonville Jaguars NFL team suddenly withdrew. Khan’s decision to scrap the offer, which the FA first made public in April and has been consulting on ever since, came a week before the FA’s 127-member council was due to vote on the proposed sale. The FA chairman, Greg Clarke, and chief executive, Martin Glenn, have consistently argued for the sale, to release the £600m and further matched funding to improve grassroots, public football facilities throughout England which are generally run-down and suffering from local authority budget cuts. Continue reading...
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Crewe suspend academy coach over safeguarding issue and spark FA inquiry (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
• Head of foundation Carl Everall’s behaviour investigated • Crewe back in spotlight after Gradi and Bennell cases Crewe Alexandra have suspended their head of foundation because of a safeguarding issue that has led to the club notifying the Football Association. Carl Everall, who has been coaching in the club’s academy since 2013, is also understood to have been suspended from all football-related activities by the FA while the governing body conducts inquiries into allegations relating to his behaviour. “This is a safeguarding and police matter so therefore the FA is not in a position to comment,” an FA spokesman said. Continue reading...
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England dealt another blow as Mako Vunipola joins Eddie Jones’s injury list (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
• Calf tear rules Saracens prop out of Autumn internationals • Eddie Jones has now lost 15 key players for November Tests England’s injury crisis for next month’s autumn internationals has deepened after Mako Vunipola was ruled out for up to six weeks with a calf tear. With Mako’s brother Billy among 15 other frontline players missing, Eddie Jones’s plans for England’s November series are in turmoil and with a particular lack of experienced options at loosehead prop. Saracens confirmed Mako Vunipola will be sidelined with the injury suffered against Glasgow last Sunday, ending his chances of featuring in Tests against South Africa, New Zealand, Japan and Australia. “Mako’s got a calf injury, so it looks like it’s going to be around six weeks,” said the Saracens director of rugby, Mark McCall. Continue reading...
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West Ham inquiry into Mark Phillips to see if he brought club into disrepute (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
• Youth coach attended Democratic Football Lads Alliance march • DFLA has been condemned by anti-racism campaigners West Ham’s investigation into the youth coach who went on a march organised by the Democratic Football Lads Alliance, a group condemned by anti-racism campaigners, will focus on whether he has brought the club into disrepute. Related: West Ham suspend coach who went on Democratic Football Lads Alliance march Continue reading...
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Canelo Álvarez signs richest contract in sport history, worth $365m (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Boxer agrees 11-fight contract with streaming service DAZN Mexican fighter faces Britain’s Rocky Fielding on 15 December Canelo Álvarez has signed the largest contract in the history of sport, agreeing a five-year, 11-fight deal worth at least $365m with streaming service DAZN. The move comes after DAZN, which only launched in the US in September, looks to exploit a gap in the market after HBO announced it will end its 45-year history of broadcasting boxing at the end of 2018. Álvarez has a huge following in Mexico and the United States and his fights have pulled in hundreds of millions of dollars on pay-per-view. However, his fights on DAZN will not be part of a pay-per-view deal but will instead be accessible to viewers who pay $9.99 a month for a streaming service showing a package of combat sports. The Mexican fighter can also earn money on top of his deal if he helps bring in a certain number of subscriptions during his contract. Continue reading...
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The Fiver | Sergio Ramos and a masterclass in deflection (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Sign up now! Sign up now! Sign up now? Sign up now! Who’d have thought it? A couple of months in and the Uefa Nations League can almost be considered a qualified success! England have finally found something they’re a little bit better at than Germany; Raheem Sterling’s goals have piqued £100m interest from Real Madrid, good news for anyone less than excited by the prospect of Manchester City doing a Juventus/Bayern/Queen’s Celtic over the next 17 years, which let’s face it, is very much on the cards; and this type of list works best rhythmically in threes, but this is all we’ve got. Two reasons are more than enough, though, when you consider expectations going into this thing were significantly less than zero. Continue reading...
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Manchester United takeover tale puts wrong spotlight on Saudi Arabia | Marina Hyde (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The widely carried rumours are the latest example of social media concoctions that swell well beyond their substance Even in dark times, the idealism of some football fans remains a beautiful thing to behold. Suggestions over the past week that the Glazer family were considering selling Manchester United to a certain party were greeted with delight in various quarters. As one United supporter positively willing the deal to happen put it: “We deserve better.” Better, in this case, would be Saudi prince Mohammed bin Salman, a man whom journalistic cliche demands we style as “in the news for all the wrong reasons”. But hey – nobody’s perfect. Related: José Mourinho charged with improper conduct after Newcastle match Continue reading...
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Healing the scars of war: the women rebuilding Mozambique's national park - video (ven., 07 sept. 2018)
In the heart of central Mozambique, Gorongosa park was destroyed in the crossfire of the country's civil war. Now women are leading the way in its restoration, helping to heal the scars left by the conflict and inspiring young girls from the surrounding communities, through an education programme that offers them the promise of a brighter future Continue reading...
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Our tomorrows: teenagers around the world share their fears and dreams – video (lun., 24 sept. 2018)
Young people talk about how it feels to grow up in 2018, from dealing with racism in New York and fighting for LGBT rights in Jakarta to facing exam pressures in the Kenyan Rift Valley and the importance of giving back to society in Delhi Continue reading...
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Narcotours: Netflix fans uncover the real life of Pablo Escobar - video (jeu., 04 oct. 2018)
The Colombian city of Medellín has long been associated with drug lord Pablo Escobar, and with the popularity of Netflix's Narcos, a new influx of tourists are visiting the city to see where the infamous kingpin operated. The Guardian’s Iman Amrani speaks to the people whose lives were affected by Escobar, and with the city’s mayor who is trying to turn Medellín’s narrative away from its dark past Continue reading...
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'Fly me to the moon? No thanks': Ryan Gosling on First Man – video (ven., 12 oct. 2018)
Ryan Gosling and the director Damien Chazelle talk to the Guardian's Catherine Shoard about their biopic based on James R Hansen's book First Man: The Life of Neil A Armstrong. The film follows the years leading up to the Apollo 11 mission in 1969  Continue reading...
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'Lives instead of knives': one woman's fight to end knife crime in London – video (mar., 09 oct. 2018)
Smith's Farm Estate in Northolt, north-west London, has been the scene of multiple stabbings. After one murder came particularly close to home, community volunteer Jen Lock began a one-woman mission to end knife crime in the area. But, as she finds out, things don’t always go smoothly Continue reading...
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Brexit breakdown part 4: two years on, why is Britain so bleak? (mar., 25 sept. 2018)
In the concluding part of their journey into the heart of 2018's weirdness, John Harris and John Domokos go to a Leave Means Leave rally and ask an obvious question: how did this side win? For the answer, they go to Labour conference, and then to a massive distribution centre at the cutting-edge of the new economy Continue reading...
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Brexit breakdown part 3: can we put Britain back together again? (ven., 21 sept. 2018)
In the third part of their summer-long quest to get to the heart of the UK's condition, John Harris and John Domokos head to Boston in Lincolnshire. They find Brexit voters who still think no one is listening to them and Polish people feeling ever more unwelcome. But in London, protesters against Donald Trump offer a ray of hope and the prospect of something that might finally heal the country's wounds Continue reading...
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Brexit breakdown part 2: 'We've lost control' (mer., 19 sept. 2018)
As their new series continues, John Harris and John Domokos meet Jeremy Corbyn's army of activists, teachers and parents at a Walsall school hit by funding cuts and protesters at a London march in support of a second Brexit referendum. They seem to live in different worlds but everyone has one thing in common: a sense that Britain has to change, before it's too late Continue reading...
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Brexit breakdown part 1: Why are the Tories winning Walsall? (lun., 17 sept. 2018)
With Brexit fast approaching, John Harris and John Domokos have spent four months sampling the mood of the country. In episode one of this new series, they spend time in the Midlands town of Walsall, where despite cuts and Tory chaos, Labour isn't breaking through  Continue reading...
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Are the yips really the greatest threat to a golfer? – video (jeu., 27 sept. 2018)
Feared and dismissed in equal proportion, the yips were once endowed with an almost mythical status. Previously an ailment exclusive to golfers, in recent years participants from sports as varied as snooker and basketball have been diagnosed with the condition. While the cause is still hotly debated there's no doubting its existence and the term is so regularly used that it often gets erroneously ascribed. So what exactly are the yips? And are they really to be feared? Continue reading...
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Spike Lee talks to Gary Younge about BlacKkKlansman​ and racism under Trump​ – video (jeu., 23 août 2018)
Spike Lee’s latest film is about a black cop who infiltrated the Ku Klux Klan in the 1970s. Based on a true story, BlacKkKlansman draws clear parallels with racial tensions in modern America. With Donald Trump in the White House, the rise of white supremacy, and a spike in racist attacks, what does a film about a black man going undercover with white terrorists tell us about the state of contemporary America and beyond? Spike Lee: ‘This guy in the White House has given the green light for the Klan BlacKkKlansman review – Spike Lee hits his targets again and again Continue reading...
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Danny Dyer to 'inject fun' into history for BBC One (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
EastEnders actor – and descendant of William the Conqueror – to explore 800 years of history He captured the nation’s attention in June with an outspoken tirade about Brexit negotiations before a television audience of millions. Now Danny Dyer has been given a role fronting a history series for BBC One. The EastEnders actor will present Danny Dyer’s Right Royal Family as the corporation tried to “inject fun” into some of its factual programming and create “event TV” to combat the rise of streaming rivals such as Netflix. Continue reading...
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Stephen Colbert on Trump's 'stupid and delusional' defence of Saudi Arabia (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Late-night hosts criticised the president’s latest attempt to defend Mohammed bin Salman while he also found time to criticise Stormy Daniels again Late-night hosts discussed Donald Trump’s attack on Stormy Daniels and his continued defence of Saudi prince Mohammed bin Salman. Continue reading...
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Caroll Spinney, Sesame Street's Big Bird, to retire after 50 years (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The veteran puppeteer and actor, who also portrayed Oscar the Grouch, will film an anniversary episode of the children’s TV show before flying the nest Caroll Spinney, the veteran actor and puppeteer who provided the voices for Sesame Street’s Big Bird and Oscar the Grouch, is retiring after almost 50 years as a key part of America’s most well-known children’s television show. Spinney will work on a final show this week, which will be used for Sesame Street’s 50th-anniversary celebrations in 2019. He is retiring having worked on thousands of episodes of the programme, which debuted in 1969. Continue reading...
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Goosebumps 2 review – rarely scary horror for kids (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
This second film based on the RL Stine book series is likable enough but lacks the jolts and giggles of its predecessor Goosebumps (2015) offered an unexpectedly playful distillation of RL Stine’s teen-horror oeuvre, energised and elevated by Jack Black’s turn as a neurotic Stine variant. Presumably held up at that house with a clock in its walls, the actor is a regrettably late arrival in this by-the-book sequel, which leaves us watching kids running around blandly safe suburban spaces that the film’s one rogue element – a walking, talking ventriloquist’s doll named Slappy – can only disrupt so much. Yielding fewer jolts and giggles than its predecessor, the results play more like functionally programmed babysitting software than any work of the imagination. Not for the first time in recent years, accompanying adults of a certain age may find themselves pining for the heyday of Joe Dante. The problem lies not strictly with what’s on screen – which on its own, reduced terms is basically watchable and not unlikable – but in what’s been elided or forgotten about in the rush to duplicate the original’s surprise success: any sustained wit or personality. Incoming director Ari Sandel – a shrugging replacement for the first movie’s Rob Letterman – increasingly displays one tactic, getting the effects team to toss all his constituent elements (Frankengnomes, Gummi Bear monsters, grape-shaped balloons) in the air, then spiralling the camera to see where they land. The second-half revival of Black’s funny Uncle Capote schtick briefly raises the film’s middling game, but also highlights what’s gone missing, and how Sandel tends to lob comedians at the screen rather than passing them workable material. Continue reading...
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Game of Thrones' Maisie Williams: 'I'm still petrified of my peers' (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Her role as Arya Stark won her millions of fans but left her bullied at school. Now the 21-year-old is making her stage debut, starring in a Marvel horror – and finally getting her fingernails painted Maisie Williams is wearing big round glasses, leopard-print boots and a baker boy hat, all of which makes her look like she’s just stepped out of Carnaby Street in 1969. As she sips a massive cup of herbal tea, she explains she is trying to cut down on coffee. “I drink a lot,” she says. “Like, you look away and the filter pot is empty. People say you can just cut down, but I don’t understand what that means. I’m an all or nothing kind of person.” At 21, Williams is about to make her stage debut at Hampstead theatre in London, where we meet. She is starring in I and You, a teen-tilted drama by Lauren Gunderson who, after Shakespeare, was the most produced playwright in America last year. When I first met Williams, she was 15 and her mum sat in on the interview. We were in Bath, where she spent a large part of her teens, to talk about the upcoming third season of Game of Thrones. As Arya Stark, the quick-witted grudge-bearer who’s handy with a sword, she was already a fan favourite. Even then, she talked about how much she’d like to try acting on stage. Continue reading...
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Anna Burns's Booker prize win and poet Kate Tempest – books podcast (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Milkman delivers the 2018 Man Booker prize, while we listen in as a poet discusses the lyric art with her editor This week saw Anna Burns crowned as winner of the 2018 Man Booker prize. We discuss how Milkman speaks to us in the era of Brexit and #MeToo, despite its setting in 1970s Northern Ireland, and how a literary award can transform an author’s life. Then we hear from the poet Kate Tempest, who sits down to talk process with her editor and fellow poet Don Paterson. Can an old relationship ever find closure, and what happens when you’re so deep in poetry you can’t see past the way a poem is constructed? And does writing poetry ever get any easier? Continue reading...
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Killing Eve: six looks to die for from the BBC thriller (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Villanelle, the fictional female assassin, is a style inspiration. From her sundress to a power suit, there’s something for everyone It says something, our times as they are, that a fictional female assassin from the BBC drama Killing Eve is being cited alongside models, actors, royals and influencers as style inspiration this season. Villanelle’s fashion sense is uncategorisable; put her in a box and she will slice straight through it. Clothes mean a lot to her; when Eve laments in the finalé: “I have lost two jobs, a husband and a best friend because of you,” Villanelle replies: “Yeah, but you got some really nice clothes out of it.” Her style is slippery and, as such, her outfits have something for everyone. Continue reading...
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Can a well-positioned tennis ball help prevent snoring? (mar., 16 oct. 2018)
The NHS website claims that taping one to your pyjamas will stop you from snoring. But, as our intrepid reporter discovers, it’s not quite so simple ‘Try taping a tennis ball to the back of your sleepwear,” is one of the simple lifestyle changes you can make to prevent snoring, offered by the NHS website. It stops you from sleeping on your back, when snoring is most likely to occur. I like it: it’s simple, cheap and non-surgical. There have been a few complaints in my house, to be honest, specifically regarding my room, especially after a glass of rioja or two. I’ll give it a go. First thoughts: the taping process is challenging. I can’t see, or reach back there. The tape gets twisted; the ball falls to the floor. Love-15. Continue reading...
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Sea urchin is in demand. It’s the ocean’s foie gras: delicious, but not entirely ethical (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Fresh, salty and creamily opulent, this rust-coloured paste, known in Japan as uni, is a meal I’ll remember for the rest of my life There are only going to be a handful of meals you think about on your deathbed. It doesn’t matter how many times you have sampled the latest deep-fried insect limbs or unicorn smoothie – ultimately, you will be left with four or five things seared on your brain. On my list, right up there alongside fillet steaks from Hawksmoor and the wines of Bekaa Valley, would be uni, the Japanese name for sea urchin, as it’s more widely known in the UK. I first came across the delicacy in California a few years back, when it was all the rage in sushi bars. Had somebody told me that what I was eating were the sea creature’s gonads, scraped from within its cracked-open shell, I might not have felt quite so peckish. But, blissfully unaware, I popped the rust-coloured paste – wrapped in seaweed and dabbed with wasabi – into my mouth. Continue reading...
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Life after bowel surgery: I was like the Pompidou centre, my pipes on the outside (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
In his early 20s, the author William Fiennes had an operation that left him with a spout of open intestine. For the next two years, he marvelled at the strangeness of his own body The pain began when I was 18: cramps like a torsion in the bowels, shock splashes of blood in the toilet bowl, the weakness after a dozen bouts of diarrhoea. I would feel porous, ghostly, like cirrus, as if solid things could pass straight through me. When I was a child, I thought illness was just an interval, at worst a few days in bed, my mother stirring glucose powder into fresh orange juice, using a kettle to fill the bedroom with steam, the world waiting outside until you were ready to step back into it. But this was a new region of experience and language: my abdomen inflating like a balloon as doctors pumped air in via sigmoidoscopes, plastic tubes threaded down my nose and throat into the stomach and ileum, litres of heavy barium milk betraying the sausagey coils of my intestines to x-rays, the “sharp scratch” mantra of phlebotomists after fixing the tourniquet and pressing a latex finger to the vein, the companionship of drip-stands, the quick taste of metal before you went under; canulas and endoscopes; the splenic flexure and the Houston valve; ulcer, granuloma, Crohn’s disease. There are things we only think about when they go wrong: the fanbelt, the combi boiler, the bowel. Before illness I must have imagined a gummy muddle behind my navel, but now gastroenterologists drew me a tube stretching 20ft from mouth to anus, air and light at each end, an ingenious pipework that incorporated oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, ileum, colon and rectum, and contained 100m nerve cells or neurons, more than in the spinal cord, as well as 95% of the body’s serotonin. I began to feel, specifically, the topography of the colon or large bowel sitting across my abdomen – the ascending, sigmoid and descending colon, the bends at spleen and liver known as the splenic and hepatic flexures – which, when healthy, is a brilliant gourd absorbing 10 litres of liquid a day (water, saliva, gastric acids, biliary secretions, pancreatic juice), but which in my case had become the messy red bioscape of ulcers, inflammation and scar tissue I saw in photographs from colonoscopies, a tiny mobile eye with its miner’s headlamp probing the dark, curving tunnels. Continue reading...
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How to cook the perfect piri piri chicken – recipe (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Preparing the nation’s favourite dish at home begins with tracking down that all-important chilli A Portuguese dish with its roots in Angola and Mozambique, popularised in the UK by a Johannesburg-based restaurant chain, piri piri chicken may have a complicated past, but its present is crystal clear: we absolutely love it. That “cheeky” chain, Nando’s, has been described as “one of the most successful cults in Britain”, having carved itself an unlikely, but undeniable niche in our national identity. In perhaps the ultimate sign of its success, piri piri has now been added to the list of dubious attractions at my local Texan fried chicken shop, too. It seems we just can’t get enough spicy grilled poultry. Popularity, however, breeds contempt – and, even leaving aside questions of animal welfare, not all this piri piri has the vim and vinegar of the salty, sizzling stuff shoved through the hatch of your average Lisbon kiosk or churrascaria. Fortunately, however, if you can grill chicken, you can make much better piri piri chicken at home. Continue reading...
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New York’s Museum of Pizza is too cheesy by half (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
This pop-up experience is a non-stop Instagram photo-op, but the happy snappers inside are paying a hefty price to help big brands sell more grub I went to the Museum of Pizza and all I got was this lousy feeling that capitalism has gone too far and we all deserve to die. I love pizza. I respect pizza. I always try to treat pizza well. Nevertheless, 20 minutes at New York’s first ever Museum of Pizza almost broke me. I entered feeling vaguely optimistic about life; I left with a crushing sense of existential despair. The Museum of Pizza, which opened in a fancy Brooklyn hotel on 13 October, is the latest in a string of Instagram-friendly “museums” popping up in major metropolises. It comes hot on the heels of The Egg House, an interactive New York “eggventure” for people who love eggs (seriously), the Museum of Ice Cream, the Museum of Candy and the Rosé Mansion. All of which are inane experiences designed, it would appear, purely to provide Instagram backdrops for young people with more disposable income than sense. #latecapitalism #dyinginside Continue reading...
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How to season your food: why fresh herbs aren’t always better (jeu., 30 août 2018)
Salt and pepper are the bedrocks of seasoning, but why stop there? Here’s how to get the best out of the huge array of dried herbs and spices sitting in your cupboard Food cooked without herbs, spices or seasoning is like an orchestra missing the string section; the culinary symphony just won’t taste as good as it should without them. They add flavour and also enhance it, by coaxing out the best in the main ingredients. And using dried herbs and spices is the easiest and least expensive way to transform what might otherwise be an ordinary dish into something special. Continue reading...
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Visit Wales: 12 of the best Welsh beaches (jeu., 19 juil. 2018)
The coastline of Wales is dotted with more than 100 beaches, many of them award-winning. Whether it’s seclusion, sunbathing or sand dunes you’re after, one of our top dozen will be the perfect match For inspiration to plan your break in Wales check out visitwales.co.uk Continue reading...
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John Suchet: ‘I have one rule about what I won’t eat – it mustn’t be moving’ (mer., 19 sept. 2018)
What happens when you take one music-loving foodie, and add a new Beautifully Simple recipe from Waitrose & Partners? We met newsreader and Classic FM host John Suchet to find out Complete the sentence: ‘Music and food are the perfect match because ...’ They exercise your senses. Eating should be a sensuous experience, and sometimes you have to rush your meal, which is sacrilege in a way. If you’re able to, take time to enjoy it. What music do you play when you’re entertaining? Baroque has a nice steady beat, and sits nicely in the background. Vivaldi’s Four Seasons is an obvious one, but people can hum along while eating. Continue reading...
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How much can we say with our hands? Video (jeu., 11 oct. 2018)
From communicating across distances and gesture-control technology to the roots of non-verbal language, sometimes our hands take us beyond words   Continue reading...
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Man falls from top floor of Westfield Stratford on to another shopper (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Met police confirm reports of a man falling from a height and an injured woman A man has fallen from the top floor of Westfield shopping centre in Stratford, east London, on to another shopper, according to reports. The Metropolitan police confirmed that emergency services were called to the shopping centre at about 4pm to reports of a man falling from a height and an injured woman. Continue reading...
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Bank of England raises alarm over surge in high-risk lending (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Central bank draws parallels to 2008 financial crisis in warning about leveraged loans The Bank of England has issued a stark warning over the rapid growth in lending to indebted companies around the world, drawing parallels with the US sub-prime mortgage market that triggered the 2008 financial crisis. Threadneedle Street said Britain was not immune from a global boom in risky lending that had alarmed financial regulators around the world this year, with the US market for such loans more than doubling since 2010 to surpass $1tn (£763bn). Continue reading...
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Flybe profits warning wipes 40% off regional airline's value (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Forecast of ‘softening’ revenues over next six months blamed on falling demand Flybe’s shares have taken another nosedive after the regional airline issued a profits warning. About 40% was wiped off the company’s value in trading on Wednesday after Flybe forecast “softening” revenues over the next six months due to falling consumer demand. The closing share price was just 19p. Continue reading...
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London Paddington rail disruption likely to persist after power loss (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Delays may run into Thursday after test of new train brought down overhead cables Disruption is likely to persist in and out of London Paddington after an incident during the testing of a new intercity train led to the closure of tracks into one of Britain’s busiest rail stations for almost 14 hours. Train operators and Network Rail said passengers still faced significant disruption, although two of four tracks reopened at midday. Limited services will run west from the capital on Wednesday evening but tracks would close from 9.15pm to allow full emergency repairs. The knock-on effects are expected to affect Thursday morning services. Continue reading...
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May vows 'very serious' response to Commons bullying report (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
PM’s comments came after Labour MP used PMQs to highlight case of constituent Theresa May has promised a “very serious” response to a report on workplace bullying in parliament after a Labour MP used prime minister’s questions to highlight the case of a constituent who complained of sexual harassment while working in the Commons. Two days after a report by Dame Laura Cox disclosed the scale of bullying and harassment in parliament, the vast majority targeting female employees, Teresa Pearce raised a new example. Continue reading...
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Tory MP's victory over Farage 'might have been void if expenses accurate' (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Craig Mackinlay was complicit in overspend on campaign to beat Ukip leader, court told The election of a Conservative MP could have been declared void if he had filed accurate returns that showed he had overspent on his campaign to beat Nigel Farage, a court has heard. Craig Mackinlay, an accountant, stands accused along with his election agent and a party official of deliberately submitting “woefully inaccurate” expenditure returns. Continue reading...
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Divided Britain: study finds huge chasm in attitudes (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Far-right and anti-Islam ideas taking root in post-industrial towns, says Hope Not Hate Britain is hugely divided across cultural, age and education lines, a major study of national attitudes has concluded, warning of a potential rise in far-right and anti-Islam sentiments unless politicians tackle long-standing disaffections behind the Brexit vote. There is a particular chasm between people living in affluent, multicultural cities and those from struggling post-industrial towns, according to the report from Hope Not Hate, based on six years of polling and focus groups. Continue reading...
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Cheaper chocolate and meat drive down UK inflation in September (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
ONS says consumer price index fell to 2.4% last month from 2.7% in August UK inflation dropped further than expected last month as the falling price of meat and chocolate helped reduce some of the pressure on cash-strapped British consumers. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) said the consumer price index (CPI) fell to 2.4% in September from 2.7% the previous month, confounding City analysts’ forecasts for a more modest reduction to 2.6%. Continue reading...
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Vast archive of tweets reveals work of trolls backed by Russia and Iran (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Two misinformation campaigns spent years sowing discord in US and elsewhere More than 10m tweets sent by state actors attempting to influence US politics have been released to the public, forming one of the largest archives of political misinformation ever collated. The database reveals the astonishing extent of two misinformation campaigns, which spent more than five years sowing discord in the US and had spillover effects in other national campaigns, including Britain’s EU referendum. Continue reading...
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Crimea college attack: student carries out mass shooting in Kerch (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
At least 19 dead and scores wounded in ‘armed rampage’ that may have involved bombs At least 19 people have been killed and almost 40 wounded in a shooting carried out by a student at a vocational college in Crimea. Several witnesses described a gunman stalking the halls and firing at classmates and teachers until he ran out of ammunition. A bomb may also have been detonated during the attack, although Russian government agencies provided conflicting reports. Sappers said they later disarmed several more explosive devices at the college. Continue reading...
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Murdoch children may get up to $2bn each in 21st Century Fox sale (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The family trust owns 17% stake in entertainment empire worth a little over $12bn Rupert Murdoch’s six children could each receive as much as $2bn (£1.5bn) from the sale of his 21st Century Fox global entertainment empire to Disney. Murdoch is in the final stages of completing the $71.3bn sale of 21st Century Fox, which includes the Hollywood studio behind hits from Deadpool to X-Men and a 39% stake in Sky. The family trust, which the 87-year old Murdoch controls, owns a 17% stake in Fox worth a little over $12bn. Continue reading...
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Indian minister resigns over #MeToo allegations (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Mobashar Jawed Akbar has filed criminal defamation charges against one of his accusers An Indian minister accused of sexual harassment by more than 20 women has resigned as India’s #MeToo movement widens. Mobashar Jawed Akbar, a junior foreign minister, submitted his resignation on Tuesday, saying it was appropriate to step down while he presses defamation charges against one of his accusers. Continue reading...
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Rival's advert points up Jair Bolsonaro's links with Steve Bannon (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Fernando Haddad flags up ties after populist’s son boasted of meeting ex-Breitbart chief Donald Trump’s former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, has taken a starring role in Brazil’s increasingly antagonistic presidential election, with opponents of Jair Bolsonaro flagging up the far-right frontrunner’s links to the “democracy-sabotaging” North American nationalist. A campaign advert for Bolsonaro’s left-wing rival, Fernando Haddad, that was released on Tuesday night highlighted the ties between the Trump-praising Brazilian populist and the man Time magazine has called “The Great Manipulator”. Continue reading...
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Everglades: climate change threatens years of work to reverse man-made damage (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Report warns that rising temperatures threaten the Everglades, including changing rainfall patters and accelerating sea-level rise Sea water encroaching on the Everglades will hamper decades of work by a government program to reverse manmade damage to the vast, fragile ecosystem at the tip of Florida, according to a new report published on Wednesday. The federal, multi-billion-dollar Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, authorized by Congress in 2000, was designed to redirect fresh water, reducing sea water incursion in a long-term effort to bring the tropical wetland ecosystem back to the way it looked in the early 20th century, before influxes of people to southern Florida drained much of it for development. The region, known as the “river of grass,” is less than an hour’s drive from Miami but is home to mangrove forests and cypress swamps housing alligators, orchids, storks and ibises, and threatened species such as the Florida panther. But it has long struggled to recover from water diversions for agriculture, swelling communities and other forms of environmental degradation, such as fertilizer run-off. Continue reading...
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Canada becomes second country to legalise Cannabis (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Country becomes largest with legal national marijuana marketplace Canada legalizes marijuana: here’s everything you need to know The Canadian government is ready to pardon those with a cannabis possession record of 30 grams or less as the country becomes the world’s second and largest country with a legal national marijuana marketplace. Related: Canada legalizes marijuana: here's everything you need to know Continue reading...
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Video shows off-duty Chicago police officer shooting unarmed autistic man (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Sgt Khalil Muhammad shot then-18-year-old Ricardo Hayes in 2017 incident initially described as an armed confrontation Video footage released on Tuesday by a civil rights group shows an off-duty Chicago police officer shooting an unarmed, autistic man during an incident initially described as an armed confrontation. Sgt Khalil Muhammad shot then-18-year-old Ricardo Hayes as he walked on the city’s South Side. Hayes had wandered away from his home around 5am on 13 August 2017, according to a lawsuit over the shooting filed by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). His caretaker called police, informing them he was autistic. Continue reading...
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Send us a tip on haunted places for the chance to win a £200 hotel voucher (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Go on, try to scare us with your most haunted or spooky places to visit across the UK Things that go bump in the night, ghostly footsteps or ghastly apparitions … With Halloween just round the corner, we’re steeling ourselves to hear about haunted day trip locations around the UK, be they pubs, ancient monuments or other “attractions”, particularly if they have a horrific history attached. Please be specific about locations, with websites and entrance costs where appropriate, and ensure your tip stays within around 100 words. Continue reading...
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Have your photos published in the Guardian’s letters pages (lun., 15 janv. 2018)
We’re highlighting the best reader photography in print in the letters pages of the Guardian. Share your images with us here The Guardian and Observer has a fresh tabloid format in print and we’re highlighting the best of your photography in the paper. Since 2014 our letters page has carried amazing images readers have shared: some of them being newsworthy, others more abstract. Continue reading...
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Armistice Day 100 years on: share letters, stories and photographs (dim., 12 août 2018)
Whether your family members or friends were in active service, or in some supporting role at home or abroad, we’d like to hear their stories Sunday 11 November this year will mark 100 years since the armistice treaty was signed between first world war allies and Germany, bringing to an end four years of war in western Europe. On that day people in Britain celebrated by pouring out onto the streets and gathering in large places. Church bells were rung in towns and villages across the UK, for the first time since the war began, both as a symbolic gesture and to let people know the war was over. Continue reading...
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Tips, links and suggestions: what are you reading this week? (lun., 15 oct. 2018)
Your space to discuss the books you are reading and what you think of them Are you on Instagram? Then you can be featured here by tagging your books-related posts with #GuardianBooks Scroll down for our favourite literary links Read more Tips, links and suggestions blogs Welcome to this week’s blog. Here’s our roundup of your comments and photos from last week. John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces had several admirers last week. Peter Law-Jones wrote: Continue reading...
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The motel torn apart by Hurricane Michael – where dozens still live (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Long-term residents of the American Quality Lodge in Panama City, along with people from the area, are living amid destruction after Hurricane Michael Simply getting through the day is a struggle at the American Quality Lodge, a low-rent motel where dozens of people are living in squalor amid destruction left by Hurricane Michael. Related: 'It's just devastation': Florida city begins cleaning up Michael's mess Continue reading...
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Ann Coulter believes the left has 'lost its mind'. Should we listen? (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The bestselling author has been criticized for dog-whistling to the far right. Now she’s taking aim at the left – can progressives learn anything from their sworn enemy? “If I were the Democrats,” Ann Coulter tells me on a recent morning in New York, “I would admit that we have totally effed over our working class, admit that there are legitimate complaints, that heroin coming over the southern border is destroying America. The Democrats could 100% steal the White House from Trump, because he’s not doing it.” In person, Coulter, the bestselling author and personality who has recently taken to comparing the liberal media to cancer cells, is friendly and seemingly earnest. Her face is free of the smirk it often wears in photos, but she has the same long, lean features and razor-straight hair that have been plastered on the dustjackets of so many books, and the same unblinking intensity. Continue reading...
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Inside the 19 October edition of The Guardian Weekly (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Inside the latest issue of our relaunched news weekly. Subscribe to Guardian Weekly The mystery, outrage and intrigue surrounding what happened when Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi entered the Saudi consulate in Istanbul threatens to cause a fissure in the region and beyond. In this week’s cover story, Martin Chulov, our Orwell prize-winning reporter in the Middle East, looks at the man whom many have blamed for Khashoggi’s disappearance and likely death – Saudi Arabia’s crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, and asks if the 33-year-old Saudi heir apparent can recover from what seems like a pointedly Putinesque manoeuvre. Later, Ian Black wonders what it all means for the allies of the house of Saud – especially those who rely on billions of dollars in defence investment. Last week the UN’s intergovernmental panel on climate change published a devastating report on the need for humans to take action to save the planet within the next 12 years. A week or so later and the biggest news story of our age has drifted off the news agenda. On page 48, Rebecca Solnit argues that history suggests humanity will drag itself into action to stop this impending calamity. We could all take environmental inspiration from the Isle of Man. The people of this small island off the coast of Britain have banded together to make it the first island jurisdiction to be given Unesco biosphere status. Continue reading...
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PMQs verdict: Theresa May gets off more lightly than she deserved (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Jeremy Corbyn had one excellent question but his failure to follow up cost him Jeremy Corbyn kicked off a very noisy PMQs this week by paying tribute to Patricia Hollis, the Labour peer who died this week. Continue reading...
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Open coalmine near Africa's first nature reserve divides community (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Poverty, conservation and industry are at loggerheads in the eastern town of Somkhele Drive for an hour into the hills that lie behind South Africa’s wild eastern coast, and you will find a game park full of rhino and big cats, a sprawling town spread over dozens of summits and dry valleys, and a vast opencast coal mine. If all the advantages of the rainbow nation – stunning landscape and wildlife, massive mineral resources and a youthful population – are represented here, then so too are all its problems. Continue reading...
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'If we wanted beauty, we'd travel to Paris': how Calgary resisted its iconic pedestrian bridge (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The controversial Peace Bridge is now one of the most-used walking and cycling routes in Calgary. The councillor behind it reveals the project’s stormy process “The level of hatred directed towards that piece of infrastructure was out of proportion with the cost,” says Druh Farrell as she recalls the stormy process leading to the construction of Santiago Calatrava’s pedestrian and cycling Peace Bridge in Calgary. “It was an incredibly painful process. It became so intense.” The celebrated Spanish architect was brought in to address a complicated brief. The crossing – connecting downtown to the northern river pathway and the community of Sunnyside – had to completely span the Bow River, while being flat enough to avoid obstructing a nearby helicopter-landing area. Continue reading...
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A bread train and a human chain: Wednesday's best photos (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you photo highlights from around the world Continue reading...
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Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2018 – the winners (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
Dutch photographer Marsel van Oosten’s stunning portrait of two endangered golden snub-nosed monkeys in China’s Qinling mountains has won this year’s prestigious prize. The winners were announced on Tuesday at London’s Natural History Museum. Continue reading...
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Infra Realism: deserts saturated with colour – in pictures (mar., 16 oct. 2018)
Having converted a digital camera for infrared, Australian photographer Kate Ballis used her Infra Realism series to show unique desert-scapes, such as the Joshua Tree and Sedona in the US and the Atacama desert in South America, in a different way Continue reading...
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Winner of the 2018 Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize announced – in pictures (mar., 16 oct. 2018)
Boxing, shopping, smoking, singing, swimming … the annual competition salutes the best in contemporary portrait photography, and with it the variety of human life. This year there were 5,000 submissions from 70 countries – here is the winning work from Alice Mann, plus all the runners-up and highlights from the accompanying National Portrait Gallery exhibition The Taylor Wessing photographic portrait prize exhibition is at the National Portrait Gallery, London, from 18 October to 27 January Continue reading...
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Hondurans fleeing violence join migrant caravan – in pictures (mer., 17 oct. 2018)
A caravan of at least 1,500 people fleeing crime and poverty began in San Pedro Sula in Honduras with plans to march through Guatemala and Mexico to the United States. President Trump has threatened to cut aid to Honduras if it did not stop the migrants Trump threatens to cut Honduras aid unless it stops migrant caravan Continue reading...
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From Judi to Edna: the women who electrified the 70s – in pictures (mar., 16 oct. 2018)
In 1977, the National Portrait Gallery staged a landmark exhibition, featuring 90 portraits of eminent British women photographed by Mayotte Magnus. The gallery is now updating the project with Illuminating Women, which runs until 24 March Continue reading...
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