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The Guardian

Brexit: desperate May dashes to continent in search for concessions (lun., 10 déc. 2018)
Prime minister to meet EU leaders after delaying meaningful vote to forestall a crushing defeat Brexit chaos: what happens next? Theresa May is to embark on a frantic round of European diplomacy in a final attempt to salvage her Brexit deal and her premiership after a chaotic day in which she pulled Tuesday’s scheduled meaningful vote in the face of overwhelming opposition. The prime minister will meet the German chancellor, Angela Merkel, in Berlin on Tuesday to seek “further assurances” to ensure that the Northern Irish backstop would never come into force, although No 10 warned a rapid breakthrough was unlikely. Continue reading...
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'What fresh Brexit hell is this?': what the papers say about May's cancelled vote (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Drama in the Commons dominates the front pages, with dire predictions for the PM’s political future There is one story leading the papers today and it is unsurprisingly Theresa May’s decision to defer the Brexit vote. The Telegraph has a remarkable front page, running an arresting photograph of May in her car after the vote, under the headline “The lady is for turning”, in a play on the famous remark by Margaret Thatcher. Continue reading...
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Macron bows to protesters' demands and says: I know I have hurt some of you (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
President takes emergency measures to placate gilets jaunes but refuses to reinstate wealth tax Emmanuel Macron has bowed to pressure from the street to announce a catalogue of emergency measures aimed at pacifying the gilets jaunes after weeks of civil unrest in France. In a long-awaited address on primetime television, the president tried to talk the protesters out of further action, promising a rise in the minimum wage and tax concessions. Continue reading...
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Maria Butina: 'covert Russian agent' will plead guilty over effort to infiltrate NRA (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Deal reached between US prosecutors and Butina, who is accused of attempting to influence gun lobby on behalf of the Kremlin Accused Russian agent Maria Butina, who is suspected of trying to infiltrate the National Rifle Association (NRA) and influence US policy toward Russia, is expected to plead guilty this week following a deal between her lawyers and US prosecutors, according to court filings on Monday. Related: How Maria Butina, accused Russian spy, worked her way into top US circles Continue reading...
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Grace Millane murder prompts outpouring of grief in New Zealand (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
British backpacker’s death sparks national conversation about violence against women The murder of the British backpacker Grace Millane has provoked an unprecedented outpouring of collective shame and grief in New Zealand, and sparked a national conversation about violence against women. The Grief Centre in Auckland said many New Zealanders were experiencing “vicarious trauma”, exacerbated by the country’s small size. Continue reading...
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Demand for NHS staff rises as EU applicants 'drop off a cliff' (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Hiring pressures at health service intensify to highest level since 2011, poll suggests The sharp slowdown in EU migrant workers coming to Britain has pushed the hiring needs of the NHS and the wider public sector to the highest levels in seven years. According to a poll of 2,102 employers across nine different industry sectors by the recruitment firm ManpowerGroup, which is used by the Bank of England as an early indicator for changes in the jobs market, hiring intentions in the public sector were at the highest level since 2011. Continue reading...
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Young adults most pessimistic on UK social mobility – poll (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
New chair of Social Mobility Commission says poll shows fears things are getting worse People aged 18 to 24 are the most pessimistic in the UK, with just one in seven thinking their age group has the most opportunity to move up in society, according to a poll. Just 13% of 18- to 24-year-olds believe their generation will go on to enjoy the best standard of living, and 12% believe they will be better off financially than older generations. Continue reading...
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Church of England to issue transgender advice for clergy (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Guidance encourages use of chosen names but does not offer transition blessing The Church of England is to publish advice on how to welcome transgender people into the Anglican faith. The guidance stops short of offering a new service or blessing but it does advise Anglican clergy to address transgender people by their chosen name, according to the BBC. Continue reading...
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Cocaine haul seized from UK couple in 70s on cruise ship (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Drugs found hidden in suitcases were found as ship returned to Portugal from Caribbean, say authorities A couple have been detained after a “large amount of cocaine” was found on a cruise ship returning from the Caribbean. The Policia Judiciaria in Portugal said foreign nationals – aged 72 and 70 and believed to be British – were detained in Lisbon after information was received from the UK National Crime Agency. Continue reading...
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Barclays lets mobile banking users block gambling and drinking (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Button in app could help customers struggling with addiction to limit spending Barclays has become the first high street bank to allow customers to block payments with certain types of retailers in a bid to give people struggling with addictions more control over their spending. The feature will be available from Tuesday for customers using Barclays’ mobile app and could help those dealing with gambling problems to cut off their spending in betting shops and on gambling websites. Continue reading...
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Two nuns admit embezzling school funds for Las Vegas gambling trips (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Church officials say pair took ‘substantial’ sum from St James school near Los Angeles Two nuns who worked at a Catholic school in California have admitted embezzling a “substantial” sum of money to pay for gambling trips to Las Vegas, church officials have said. Sisters Mary Margaret Kreuper and Lana Chang are believed to have taken the money from a fund holding tuition fees and donations at St James school in Torrance, near Los Angeles. Neither has been charged with a crime. Continue reading...
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Guardian’s Amelia Gentleman named journalist of the year (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Work on Windrush scandal earns Press Gazette award while Observer’s Carole Cadwalladr also wins The Guardian reporter Amelia Gentleman was named the journalist of the year at the Press Gazette awards in London for her work on the Windrush scandal. The Observer journalist Carole Cadwalladr was also honoured at the ceremony in London on Monday night, winning in the technology journalism category for her investigations into Cambridge Analytica and the use of personal data in political campaigning. Continue reading...
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Labour's Brexit dilemma (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Theresa May has postponed her crucial Brexit vote amid huge divisions in her party. But there is a dilemma, too, for Labour MPs whose constituencies voted overwhelmingly in favour of leaving the EU. How do they square their voters’ wishes with that of their party and their own conscience? Plus: Jonathan Freedland on why Labour should be backing a second referendum Theresa May has finally admitted parliament will not back her Brexit deal, but the prime minister is not ready to give up. In a desperate plea to MPs, she asked: “Does this house still want to deliver Brexit?” These appeals were aimed not just at the Tory MPs behind her but at Labour MPs opposite – and especially those whose constituencies voted heavily to leave the EU. One is Gloria De Piero, who holds a slim majority in the Nottinghamshire seat of Ashfield. The Guardian’s political editor Heather Stewart joined Gloria for a tour of her constituency and found voters mostly fed up with discussing Brexit and wishing that the situation would be resolved quickly. Continue reading...
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What is it like to fear your own child? (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Child-on-parent violence is a taboo subject and one that is hardly researched in the UK. We speak to Lesley, a mother who lives with daily violence from her eldest son. It has devastated family life and exposed gaps in a system not set up to deal with the problem. Plus: Emma Graham-Harrison on the Nobel peace prize winners Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad, who receive their awards today When we talk about domestic violence, we rarely think of children attacking their parents. In this episode we speak to a mother who describes the daily violence she suffers at the hands of her son. To protect the family, she is not using her real name. We are calling her Lesley Clough and her son Tom. She tells Anushka Asthana about the years of worsening violence and the lack of support she has received – and why she finally decided to write about her own experience in the course of her research. Lesley Continue reading...
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End of an era: Angela Merkel's long goodbye (Fri, 07 Dec 2018)
Angela Merkel steps down as the leader of the CDU party today after 18 years at the helm, although she plans to remain Germany’s chancellor until 2021. Her move comes after the migration crisis left her party languishing in the polls and amid a rising tide of populism in Europe. The Guardian’s Kate Connolly in Berlin takes a look at her legacy. Plus: Rania Ali on debunking stereotypes about refugees Angela Merkel, 64, has led the centre-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party in Germany for 18 years. Now, as she prepares to make way for her successor as chair of the party, she has repeated her intention to see out her term as chancellor. The Guardian’s Kate Connolly in Berlin reflects on the end of an era in German politics. She highlights the refugee crisis of 2015 and the Greek debt crisis of 2009 as critical moments in what will become Angela Merkel’s legacy. Continue reading...
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'Cyprus is saturated' - burgeoning migrant crisis grips island (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Smugglers increasingly take advantage of island’s partition and proximity to Middle East When Rubar and Bestoon Abass embarked on their journey to Europe they had no idea that Cyprus was the continent’s easternmost state. Like most Iraqi Kurds heading west, their destination was Germany, not an EU nation barely 100 miles from war-torn Syria. “I had never heard of Cyprus,” said Rubar, reaching for his pregnant wife’s hand as they sat gloomily in a migrant centre run by the Catholic charity Caritas in the heart of Nicosia. “The smugglers told us it was much cheaper to get to and was still in Europe. We paid $2,000 [£1,590] for the four of us to come.” Continue reading...
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'Guests love the playful penguins': Kim-Joy's guide to a very edible Christmas (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Forget mince pies – try baking your own iced baubles for the tree, a penguin-festooned fruit cake and white chocolate snowmen truffles that can be packaged into the perfect gift I don’t really have set Christmas traditions. My mum is Chinese, and Christmas isn’t really a big deal for her, so after my parents separated, we didn’t celebrate it much. Then, in the years when I was a care assistant, or a support worker in a hospital, I have had to work. The only things I do every year are a secret Santa with my friends – and baking. One year, I went on a baking marathon. I got it into my head that I wanted to make loads of things and photograph them all in one picture. I baked mince pies, and camembert with bread around the edge. My partner, Nabil, wanted to eat it straight away, but I had to take it outside and hold it over a hedge to photograph it. I also made little cupcakes with my own Santa Claus toppers. Continue reading...
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What is behind the spread of a mysterious allergy to meat? (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Thousands of people are developing life-threatening reactions to animal products – and a single tiny creature is to blame. By Maryn McKenna It was early morning in early summer, and I was tracing my way through the woods of central North Carolina, steering cautiously around S-curves and braking hard when what looked like a small rise turned into a narrow bridge. I was on my way to meet Tami McGraw, who lives with her husband and the youngest of their kids in a sprawling development of old trees and wide lawns just south of Chapel Hill. Before I reached her, McGraw emailed. She wanted to feed me when I got there. “Would you like to try emu?” she asked. “Or perhaps some duck?” Continue reading...
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The 50 best films of 2018 in the UK: No 9 – Coco (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Mexico’s Day of the Dead unearths family secrets in a Pixar animation whose impact has grown since its relatively low-key release See the rest of the UK countdown The best culture of 2018 Last year, on its US release, this charming Pixar animation didn’t even make our American top 50 films of 2017 list: that may have been a simple oversight or a reflection of the fact it arrived late in the year. But more likely its presence in this year’s UK top 10 owes something to the incremental increase in affection and reputation of a film that – compared to the likes of Incredibles 2 or Finding Dory – failed to ignite the hysterical advance buzz that tends to accompany most Pixar releases. On the face of, Coco may have been hampered initially by the fact that it looks pretty traditional by Pixar standards: notwithstanding the Mexican setting and clear interest in providing a corrective to standard white-bread animation. (But in truth it might have gone a little further; had it started production now it would undoubtedly have had a girl as the principal character.) Continue reading...
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Bohemian private school in area of child poverty divides residents (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Ex-Londoners accused of creating elite community in Margate and ‘writing off’ local people The migration of east London artists to the Kent seaside town of Margate has seen travel writers and property developers alike dub it Shoreditch-on-Sea. Central to this nomenclature has been Margate’s down-at-heel Cliftonville West ward, with its affordable six-bedroom former B&Bs, plentiful studio space and urban grit. This seaside suburb is now set to see fee-paying bohemian education added to the mix, with the opening of a “democratic” fee-paying school, where the pupils make the rules and decide what they learn. Continue reading...
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'Smocking Gun': Trump's latest mistake prompts derision and delight (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
A year after he gave the world ‘covfefe’, the president has coined a new phrase Last year he gave us “covfefe”. This year – and just in time for Christmas –Donald Trump has bestowed upon the English language the phrase: “Smocking Gun”. “Democrats can’t find a Smocking Gun tying the Trump campaign to Russia after James Comey’s testimony. No Smocking Gun… No Collusion,” Trump wrote on Twitter on Monday. Continue reading...
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Theresa May’s cowardly blunder may have saved us from Brexit | Polly Toynbee (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
A second referendum is now the only way out of this car crash What cowardice. She roused the country to the great climax of Tuesday’s parliamentary vote on her EU withdrawal deal, only to beat a retreat – yet another fateful error in Theresa May’s miserable, blundering leadership. This vote was set to be the cathartic moment when the country finally faced the Brexit truth. The cataclysmic collapse of May’s deal would have wiped the slate clean for her, for every MP and every party, freeing everyone to think again. Yes, hers was the only deal possible – but only if she was right that the nation’s ultimate uncrossable red line really is stopping immigration and free movement. If closing our borders is non-negotiable then hers was the only deal, whoever was prime minister. But that deal was set for a parliamentary defeat no government had suffered in living memory, with public opinion overwhelmingly against. Related: A no-deal Brexit would be the deranged action of a rogue state | Rafael Behr Continue reading...
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Brexit is a failed project. Labour must oppose it | Paul Mason (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
The opposition should get behind a second referendum – and vote to remain Sometimes, in politics, you just have to fight for what you believe in. I believe that – amid the current geopolitical meltdown – staying in the European Union and reforming it is safer than casting ourselves adrift with a bunch of rightwing Tory xenophobes at the helm. But since the referendum, I’ve understood that a leftwing Labour government can only be achieved by building a coalition of voters across the Brexit divide. It’s a belief based on the experience of the 2017 general election, when I campaigned in solidly working-class areas where, to keep a doorstep conversation going for more than 30 seconds, the first sentence had to be: “We will deliver Brexit.” Continue reading...
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Jimmy McGovern’s Care has shed light on a crisis. Now we need a solution | Dawn Foster (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
A ‘Grey New Deal’ for Britain could halt the crisis in elderly care – budget cuts are ruining lives Early in Jimmy McGovern’s BBC drama Care, broadcast on Sunday, an occupational therapist takes Mary, a character recently diagnosed with vascular dementia after a stroke, to a test kitchen in the hospital and asks her to make herself a cup of tea by first placing a teabag in a cup. Her daughters, seated behind her, dismiss the exercise as a farce: Mary has lost the ability to communicate verbally, is permanently panicked and aggressive. Yet if she succeeds in placing a teabag in a cup she will be deemed fit for discharge from the hospital, to return home and look after herself. She fails the test, trying instead to eat the bag, but the episode marks the first of many examples of the gatekeeping of care budgets. Related: A ‘volunteer army’ is no substitute for the doctors and nurses the NHS needs | Hannah Jane Parkinson Continue reading...
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Who’s the minister who could kill or save a university? Oh dear, a Thatcherite | Peter Scott (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Chris Skidmore believes in the smallest possible state. Is he going to rescue higher education from market meltdown? We are now on our third universities minister since the Conservatives shed their pesky Liberal Democrat partners following the 2015 election. The first two were victims of the Brexit Moloch. First up was Jo Johnson, who piloted the Higher Education and Research Act through parliament, only to be rewarded with relegation as minister for London. He resigned in the summer and is now a fully signed-up supporter of the “people’s vote”. Next up was Sam Gyimah, who in the end found the contradiction between his responsibility to do the best by universities and the damage Brexit would cause too much to take and also resigned. He, too, supports a second referendum. Continue reading...
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Give to our charity appeal and help stop injustices like Windrush (Fri, 07 Dec 2018)
Our readers have consistently proved they are committed to a more humane society. We are asking you to do it again Please donate to our appeal here The Windrush scandal, which exposed a catalogue of grotesque injustices inflicted on vulnerable people by a hostile immigration policy, stands at the heart of this year’s Guardian and Observer charity appeal. We are supporting charities that helped expose the scandal, brought justice for many affected by it, and which, with readers’ help, will be able to continue their vital work. As many readers will know, it was the Guardian that broke the Windrush story. Our reporting revealed a wretched immigration system that has ruined the lives of thousands of citizens. People who had lived in the UK for decades, working, paying taxes, bringing up children and contributing meaningfully to society were left jobless and homeless, destitute and stateless. Some were wrongly deported. Some have died. It is one of the most shameful episodes in recent British political history, and the hostile environment that drove it has been revealed as a social catastrophe and moral failure. Continue reading...
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Watership Down should be about death and destruction, not fluffy rabbits | Stephanie Merritt (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
I loved the 1978 film as a child, even though it terrified me. The remake should have kept the wild darkness, not toned it down We don’t like to think about death too much at Christmas these days, especially when it comes to children’s stories. This is a shame, because dwelling on the proximity of darkness has been a significant part of our collective storytelling tradition at this time of year, since long before the Green Knight crashed King Arthur’s Christmas feast. The Christmas ghost story used to be a family occasion; Henry James’s The Turn of the Screw and Susan Hill’s The Woman in Black both begin with the telling of fearful tales around the fire on Christmas Eve, a reminder that as we gather with loved ones around the warmth and lights of the hearth, the dark and the wild are still outside the windows, remnants of our pagan past – frightening and far from cosy. Continue reading...
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Laws of Maybotics collapse in PM's theatre of the absurd | John Crace (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
If May couldn’t win a meaningful vote, what hope did she have of winning a vote on not holding a vote? Shortly after lunch, Graham Brady received another letter of no confidence in the prime minister. This one was from the Four Pot Plants. Enough was enough. The laws of Maybotics had finally collapsed in on themselves. Theresa May had backed herself into a corner in which every course of action ended in extreme self-harm. Related: Brexit chaos: what happens next? Continue reading...
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Interserve's government-backed waste into energy effort stinks | Phillip Inman (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Untested incinerator tech uses about half the power generated to clean emissions it produces Interserve is best known as a Carillion-style outsourcing firm with a string of government contracts, but its woes are much more to do with it joining a government-sponsored effort to build almost useless infrastructure. The infrastructure in question is the network of energy from waste (EFW) plants dotted about the country. As successors to bog-standard incinerators they are supposed to be efficient, but they use untested technology and are not as efficient as billed because about half of the power they generate is used to clean the emissions they produce. Continue reading...
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Why should someone like Raheem Sterling be seen as ‘fair game’? | Daniel Taylor (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Stan Collymore argues that nothing will be done about abuse of Sterling because nothing ever is, but if there was more diversity in the newsrooms it might shape the thinking differently Before going into football journalism full-time I spent a few years on the news beat for various tabloid newspapers. That may surprise a few people because, outside the industry, there seems to be a perception you are either one or the other: broadsheet or red-top, luvvie or rotter. But it doesn’t actually work like that. I worked for a freelance agency in the Midlands, covering for virtually all the national titles, and there was no room for journalistic snobbery for a young reporter with a provisional driving licence and 40-words-per-minute shorthand. But it was definitely an eye-opener. One story was of a car being stolen in Leicester while, unbeknown to the thief, a baby was strapped into the back seat. The car was still missing and the police had organised a press conference for her mother, who had not been identified, to make a public appeal. It was a big story and there were a lot of national newspaper journalists in attendance. But I can still remember the awkwardness when she came in and the vibe from several reporters – not just the tabloids – that there was an issue, news-wise. The woman in question wasn’t white. She was Indian and that was a problem, I was told, because the relevant newspapers might no longer think it was a photograph, or story, their readership wanted. Continue reading...
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Premiership clubs in danger of building mental block about Europe | Robert Kitson (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Saracens apart, English sides are finding success in the Champions and Challenge Cups harder and harder to come by and the reason may lie in the mind Walking through the riot-scarred streets of Paris on Sunday evening was to be reminded Europe has more pressing issues than the Heineken Champions Cup pool stages. With due respect to Leicester and Racing 92 the shattered cashpoint machines, smashed windows of multi-national companies and gun-toting security forces roaming around Châtelet Les Halles felt slightly more urgent than the Pool 4 qualification scenario. Amid all the continuing Brexit uncertainty it is equally true Europe has more vital matters to discuss than whether Saracens, for the second year running, will be the only English club left standing in the last eight of the continent’s premier rugby tournament. That said, the halfway pool standings are beginning to look almost depressing from a Premiership perspective. After three rounds Wasps, Bath and Exeter have not yet mustered a win between them and the chances of Leicester qualifying look distinctly slim. Even the early pacesetters Newcastle have had a wobble, with Edinburgh now topping Pool 5. Continue reading...
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Jürgen Klopp urges Liverpool ‘to put right our mistake’ against Napoli (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
• Klopp says Champions League predicament is ‘our fault’ • ‘We didn’t win often enough to be through already‘ Our responsibility. Our mistake. The words peppered Jürgen Klopp’s Napoli press conference, leaving no doubt that blame for Liverpool’s Champions League predicament rests on their doorstep. Opportunity for salvation resides there too. Anfield knows the script so well. “I know it will be difficult,” their manager said, “but I can not help think about it without a smile on my face.” Liverpool have backed themselves into a corner in Europe once again as a consequence of losing three away games in a group for the first time. Carlo Ancelotti, the Napoli and former Milan manager, needs no schooling on his opponents’ powers of recovery. A 1-0 win or victory by two goals at Anfield will guarantee Liverpool qualification for the knockout phase. Defeat to an Italian club that has never won in England, combined with a loss for Paris Saint-Germain at Red Star Belgrade, and the new Premier League leaders will be out of European competition completely nine months after reaching the Champions League final. Their manager sees only an opportunity to rectify a campaign of contrasts. Continue reading...
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England's Ed Smith does not rule out Jofra Archer for World Cup (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Joe Denly handed reprieve for West Indies Test series Ollie Stone left out of ODI squad for Caribbean trip Ed Smith declined to rule out the possibility of Jofra Archer entering England’s World Cup thoughts next summer despite the fast bowler’s impending eligibility coming too late for the Test and one-day tours to the Caribbean that start a bumper 2019. A recent decision by the England and Wales Cricket Board to cut national qualification by way of residency from seven years down to three has raised the possibility of the highly rated Sussex paceman making a late play for the World Cup, not least with a view to bolstering Eoin Morgan’s options during the “death” overs. Continue reading...
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Mauricio Pochettino wary of Barcelona’s quality despite no Luis Suárez (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
• Marc-André ter Stegen and Luis Suárez missing for Barcelona • Kyle Walker-Peters to make Champions League debut for Spurs Mauricio Pochettino calls it his town and whenever his busy schedule permits, he invariably heads back there. The Tottenham manager first moved to Barcelona as a 22-year-old in 1994, when he joined Espanyol from Newell’s Old Boys in his native Argentina as a player, and it is the place where he feels centred and relaxed; full of energy. Pochettino still has a house in the north of the city, close to the mountains, and his setup is certainly appealing. He can go for a run along the stunning Carretera de las Aigues, as he has done since the Espanyol days – mixing fitness with contemplation – while the sea, weather and restaurants are obvious attractions. Continue reading...
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Lucas Digne rescues point for Everton after Watford’s crazy five minutes (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Watford fans brought inflatable snakes to taunt Marco Silva but the surest way to torment their former manager lay in the club’s first victory at Everton. It was in their grasp until stoppage time, deservedly so, only for Lucas Digne to produce an antidote for Silva and Everton’s self-inflicted suffering. Everton’s form has plummeted since they handed Liverpool victory in the 96th minute of the recent Merseyside derby. This time the 96th minute brought relief as Digne swept an exquisite free-kick into Ben Foster’s top corner following a careless handball by Christian Kabasele. Relief was fleeting as far as the Everton manager was concerned. His team led through Richarlison, the man who followed him from Vicarage Road to Goodison Park in the summer for £40m, and were punished for two lapses in concentration that produced an own goal from Seamus Coleman, plus what seemed an emphatic winner from Abdoulaye Doucouré. Continue reading...
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Stuart Lancaster insists England return has never crossed his mind (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
• ‘I’ve never spoken to Nigel Melville,’ says Leinster coach • Lancaster’s contract in Ireland ends next year Stuart Lancaster has revealed he has not given any thought to the prospect of replacing Eddie Jones for a second spell as the England coach. Lancaster’s contract with Leinster runs out at the end of the season and, while he confirmed the province has opened talks over an extension, a place on Andy Farrell’s coaching ticket with Ireland has also been mooted. Continue reading...
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Jaguars' Leonard Fournette says he confronted fan after racial slur (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Player was involved in heated exchange at Titans game Jacksonville coach says he has not considered discipline The Jacksonville Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette says he became involved in a confrontation with a fan after he was the target of a racial slur. The incident happened during the Jaguars’ game at the Tennessee Titans last Thursday. A video published by TMZ shows Fournette shouting “You’re too old for that” and “I’m gonna beat your ass” at the fan. Players can be disciplined for confrontations with fans but at his Monday press conference Jaguars head coach Doug Marrone said he believed there were extenuating circumstances. “I met with Leonard,” said Marrone. “He said there was a racial slur, so that’s what was told to me.” Marrone added no one else had mentioned the slur but said: “I trust the player.” Continue reading...
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Lloyd Russell-Moyle tells Owen Jones: 'I came out as HIV positive to break down stigma' – video (Wed, 05 Dec 2018)
Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle came out as HIV positive in a speech in the House of Commons. He tells the Guardian’s Owen Jones his diagnosis initially left him feeling like his insides had been ripped out but those fears gradually washed away and he has been able to live his life. He says he hopes his announcement can help break the stigma around HIV and help other people. An extended version of this interview is available on Owen Jones’s YouTube channel Continue reading...
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​A day with Mr Stop Brexit: crashing TV interviews and fighting Ukip – video (Wed, 28 Nov 2018)
Best known for interrupting news broadcasts and shouting: 'Stop Brexit', Steve Bray has become parliament's most persistent protester since the EU referendum result. So what motivates him to stand in Westminster come rain, wind, sun or snow?  Continue reading...
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Yotam Ottolenghi’s Christmas dinner with Grace Dent - video (Fri, 07 Dec 2018)
The star cook serves up a showstopper celebration meal - slow-roast Szechuan pepper lamb with aubergine, plus potato gratin with coconut, chilli and lime, and gingery cucumbers. Our restaurant critic surprises him with a simple, tasty, traditional north England recipe. See more videos here from Guardian Feast Continue reading...
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'There was a lot of crying': youngest Booker prize nominee on writing her first novel - video (Thu, 06 Dec 2018)
Daisy Johnson made headlines this year after becoming the youngest person to be shortlisted for the Man Booker prize with her debut novel Everything Under. Iman Amrani speaks to her about her book, which has been described as a feminist retelling of a well-known myth, which plays with the boundaries of reality and the supernatural  This interview is part of a series called Fresh Voices, presented by Amrani Continue reading...
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'I certainly opened up a conversation': Lubaina Himid on her Guardian residency – video (Mon, 03 Dec 2018)
The 2017 Turner prize-winning artist Lubaina Himid is the first Guardian artist in residence. After spending four days in the Guardian's London office she created a work entitled Random Coincidence, which included the artist painting over pages from the paper over a week-long period. Himid's focus was the paper's representation of black people and the juxtaposition of text and image. This project was initiated in collaboration with Liverpool’s Rapid Response Unit as part of a larger commission linking artists to the news cycle. Continue reading...
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'We wanted to reflect everything black women can be': authors of Slay in Your Lane – video (Fri, 30 Nov 2018)
Elizabeth Uviebinené and Yomi Adegoke are the co-authors of Slay in Your Lane: the Black Girl Bible. They talk to the Guardian's Iman Amrani about their experiences as black British women and why they have created the guide to help readers navigate their way through education, work and dating. This film is part of a new series, Fresh Voices Continue reading...
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Why trash talk is essential to the fight game – video (Fri, 30 Nov 2018)
Whether it’s showboating or shameful, puerile or poetry, trash talk is and will remain an integral part of professional fighting. It’s an invaluable promotional tool that risks contempt from the public and a powerful weapon that can distract your opponent, or make them stronger. In a sport where every move comes with the potential for a devastating counter, the double-edged nature of trash talk is most fitting Continue reading...
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Owen Jones meets Keir Starmer: 'Brexit fatigue is real – but we can't let this deal pass' – video (Fri, 30 Nov 2018)
Theresa May is facing a big battle to get her Brexit deal through parliament on 11 December amid cross-party hostility. What's Labour's alternative, and how does the party propose to reunite a divided nation? Owen Jones speaks to the shadow Brexit secretary, Keir Starmer, in the heart of his Camden constituency in north London An extended version of this interview is available on Owen Jones's YouTube channel Continue reading...
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Skip Day - high school friendship and everyday racism in Florida (Thu, 29 Nov 2018)
Intimate glimpses of one very special day in the lives of high-school seniors from an industrial corner of the Florida Everglades: prom’s over, the future is uncertain, and the irresistible pull of the beach makes the long-time friends drive 60 miles to chill, pose and revel in the waves. Once at the beach, friendship, discussions about what's next, and an unwelcome dose of everyday racism mix. Winner of the Illy Prize for best short film at Directors’ Fortnight, Cannes Film Festival. Continue reading...
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North-south economic divide set to narrow as Brexit hits London growth (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Capital no longer growing at a much faster pace than the rest of the UK, report says Slowing growth in London since the Brexit vote has put the British economy on track to narrow the north-south economic divide over the coming three years, according to a report. The accountancy firm EY, despite warning of a weaker outlook for almost every region through to 2021 amid continuing Brexit uncertainty, said London would no longer continue to grow at a much faster pace than the rest of the country. Continue reading...
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MPs voice fears over £1.28bn aid fund amid claims of links to torture (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Lack of accountability in security programme fuels allegations that UK taxpayers are unknowingly complicit in rights abuses MPs have expressed concern over the government’s flagship £1.28bn global security programme, saying a lack of transparency and accountability lends weight to allegations from rights groups and watchdogs that taxpayers are unwittingly complicit in human rights abuses. Campaigners at Reprieve have accused the government of failing to release full details of a new “rule of law” initiative in Pakistan, granted £9.3m in foreign aid and an undisclosed amount in non-aid funding. The failure to release a human rights assessment of the initiative for 2018-19 raised “the appalling prospect that British taxpayers are unknowingly complicit in torture and death sentences”, it said. Continue reading...
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Delayed Crossrail could cost almost £3bn more than planned (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Fresh bailout for London’s new rail line, which is further delayed until at least 2020 Crossrail could now cost almost £3bn more than budgeted, and the opening of the rail line across London is set to be further delayed until at least 2020. A fresh bailout announced on Monday by the mayor, Sadiq Khan, and the Department for Transport (DfT), includes loans of up to £2.05bn to London. It means the final bill for Crossrail could reach £17.6bn, instead of the £14.8bn it was expected to cost as recently as June. Continue reading...
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Clare Waight Keller triumphs at 2018 Fashion Awards (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Givenchy’s artistic director named womenswear designer of year at glitzy ceremony Clare Waight Keller, artistic director of Givenchy, has topped off what has already been an impressive year by winning the British designer of the year womenswear award at the 2018 Fashion Awards. The designer, who in 2017 became the first woman to lead the house of Givenchy, was entrusted with creating the Duchess of Sussex’s wedding dress in May. Meanwhile Givenchy recently opened a new flagship store on Old Bond Street. Continue reading...
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Chelsea suspend supporters after alleged racial abuse of Raheem Sterling (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
• Four fans banned while club conduct investigation • Chelsea vow to ‘support any criminal prosecutions’ Chelsea have suspended four people from attending their matches, pending further investigations into allegations of racial abuse directed towards Manchester City’s Raheem Sterling. The incident occurred during City’s 2-0 defeat at Stamford Bridge on Saturday. Continue reading...
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Gambler's victims to sue bookmakers where he spent stolen cash (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Claims totalling £1.5m against William Hill and Paddy Power for allegedly failing obligations Two of the UK’s largest bookmakers are facing compensation claims worth £1.5m over allegations that they allowed a gambling addict to bet hundreds of thousands of pounds in stolen cash. Betting shop records seen by the Guardian show that the addict, who has asked for his name to be withheld, staked £650,000 in two William Hill shops over six months, losing £150,000. Continue reading...
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E-receipts from leading retailers 'may break data protection rules' (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Some big high street names include unwanted marketing information, Which? says Several large retailers may be breaking data protection rules with their e-receipts, according to an investigation by the consumer body Which?. Many retailers offer to email receipts to shoppers but the rules in this area were tightened in May when the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) came into force. Continue reading...
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Man found guilty of 1986 Brighton 'babes in the wood' murders (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Scientific advances help convict Russell Bishop of killing nine-year-olds Nicola Fellows and Karen Hadaway A convicted paedophile has been found guilty of the “babes in the wood” murders at the end of a retrial that drew on scientific advances in forensics 32 years after two schoolgirls were killed. Russell Bishop had been accused of sexually assaulting and strangling Karen Hadaway and Nicola Fellows in October 1986 in woods about half a mile from Moulsecoomb, the area of Brighton where both girls lived. Continue reading...
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Japan ends search for five US marines missing after mid-air crash (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Men declared dead almost a week after fighter jet and tanker plane collided over Pacific Japan has ended its search for five US marines who went missing after a suspected mid-air collision involving a fighter jet and a refuelling aircraft. The US marines declared the missing men dead, almost a week after an FA-18 Hornet fighter jet and KC-130 Hercules tanker plane collided before crashing into the Pacific about 200 miles off Koichi prefecture in western Japan. Continue reading...
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Women and girls less likely to be considered for 'brainy' tasks – study (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Research reveals females deemed intellectually inferior, with prejudice present present in children as well as adults Women and girls are less likely to be seen as suited to brainy tasks, researchers have found, in the latest study to shed light on gender biases. Female students do better at school and are more likely to go to university than their male peers. However, the latest study reveals that females are deemed intellectually inferior, and that such prejudices are present not only in adults of both sexes but in children too. Continue reading...
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New Zealand passes laws to make medical marijuana widely available (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Legislation comes ahead of a referendum on recreational marijuana use in next two years New Zealand’s government has passed a law that will make medical marijuana widely available for thousands of patients over time, after years of campaigning by chronically ill New Zealanders who say the drug is the only thing that eases their pain. The legislation will also allow terminally ill patients to begin smoking illegal pot immediately without facing the possibility of prosecution. Continue reading...
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'Appalling' video shows NYPD officers wrenching baby from mother’s arms (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Video of officers struggling to arrest woman and remove one-year-old boy from her arms sparks outrage and an investigation A video of New York police officers wrenching a baby from his mother’s arms has sparked outrage and an investigation by the NYPD. The video shows the woman lying on the floor of a Brooklyn benefits office as several officers struggle to arrest her and remove the one-year-old boy from her arms, as she cries out, “You’re hurting my son.” Continue reading...
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Scientists identify vast underground ecosystem containing billions of micro-organisms (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Global team of scientists find ecosystem below earth that is twice the size of world’s oceans The Earth is far more alive than previously thought, according to “deep life” studies that reveal a rich ecosystem beneath our feet that is almost twice the size of that found in all the world’s oceans. Despite extreme heat, no light, minuscule nutrition and intense pressure, scientists estimate this subterranean biosphere is teeming with between 15bn and 23bn tonnes of micro-organisms, hundreds of times the combined weight of every human on the planet. Continue reading...
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Protesters disrupt US panel's fossil fuels pitch at climate talks (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Official event praising coal, oil and gas met with laughter and chants of ‘shame on you’ A Trump administration presentation extolling the virtues of fossil fuels at the UN climate talks in Poland has been met with guffaws of laughter and chants of “Shame on you”. Monday’s protest came during a panel discussion by the official US delegation, which used its only public appearance to promote the “unapologetic utilisation” of coal, oil and gas. Although these industries are the main source of the carbon emissions that are causing global warming, the speakers boasted the US would expand production for the sake of global energy security and planned a new fleet of coal plants with technology it hoped to export to other countries. Continue reading...
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Global super-rich bought 153 homes for at least £20m each in past year (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Highest number of sales in Hong Kong as London’s ultra-prime housing market slips amid Brexit concerns More than 150 homes around the world changed hands for more than £20m ($25m) each in the past year, as the “relentless creation of private wealth” fuelled the global ultra-prime housing market. The world’s richest people spent a combined £5.2bn ($6.6bn) on 153 properties that each sold for more than £20m in the year to end of August 2018, according to research by the estate agent Knight Frank. Continue reading...
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UN states agree historic global deal to manage migration crisis (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
First international pact on movements of people reached between 164 nations, despite US-led objections The first ever international deal on the migration crisis was signed on Monday by a majority of UN states, despite vociferous objections led by the United States. The historic, non-binding global pact seeking to better manage migration was approved by delegates from 164 nations following 18 months of debate and negotiation. German chancellor Angela Merkel hailed it as an “important day”. Continue reading...
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The 50 best TV shows of 2018: No 8 – Black Earth Rising (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Hugo Blick tore up the TV rulebook with a pulsating drama that forced us to reflect on Rwanda’s horrifying chapter in modern history See our list of 2018’s best TV shows The genocide directed by the Hutu majority government against the Tutsi population in Rwanda lasted just 100 days in 1994, yet up to a million Rwandans are estimated to have been killed. It occurred when, in the west at least, we were basking pacifically under the blue skies of the End of History, with the collapse of the Berlin wall dispelling cold war anxiety, perhaps for good. This act of genocide was a reminder of how easily humanity can recoil into barbarism. Hugo Blick, previously responsible for the likes of The Shadow Line, set himself the invidious task of converting this subject matter into BBC drama, with all its protocols, demands and constraints. He pulled it off magnificently, by his shrewd approach to storytelling and to the unorthodox styling of the show, and with the excellent assistance of a cast that included Michaela Coel, John Goodman, Harriet Walter and Blick himself, as the brilliant but unpleasant lawyer Blake Gaines. Continue reading...
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The 50 best albums of 2018, No 9: Low – Double Negative (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
The best album of the Duluth band’s career sounds familiarly glacial and hymn-like – but recorded all wrong: it’s the sound of the world collapsing This year was filled with music that attempted to reflect the times. So much so that it felt faintly exhausting: it was hard to avoid the sense that artists felt impelled to comment on The Age We Live In whether or not they had anything interesting or original to say about it. But no piece of rigorously woke pop or explicit evisceration of Trump’s America sums up how 2018 frequently felt quite as well as Low’s Double Negative, an album that says very little directly about the state of things. Continue reading...
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HQ: (I Feel So Mezzaniney) review – follow the warped French maids! (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Second Home, LondonDisaffection trumps dynamism in Steven Warwick and Carlos Maria Romero’s site-responsive piece staged in a co-working space The minimal electro beat ramps up and a gaggle of go-go dancers swivel their hips. Dressed like warped French maids in frilly wetsuits and heels (men and women alike), they are not dancing with joy, nor offering the hard sell of someone trying to persuade you to tuck a bank note in their knickers. But there is effort, no doubt about that. This is the unsexy sweat of work, and these workers are putting in their hours. Part of the London contemporary music festival, this is a site-responsive piece by composer Steven Warwick and choreographer/dancer Carlos Maria Romero, a London-based Colombian mostly working in live art and queer politics. Continue reading...
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The Bedroom by Michelle Perrot review – an intimate history (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
A thrilling survey of bedrooms across the centuries takes in sex and privacy, God and glamour, rest and death The bedroom, says French superstar historian Michelle Perrot, is the place where everything important has already happened. From the days when early man first rolled a boulder in front of his cave and told neighbours to knock first, to hospital rooms, ladies’ boudoirs, prison cells and Proust’s cork-lined grime box, the bedroom is the place where we are most authentically, and explosively, ourselves. Perrot sets out to locate what she calls the “multiple genealogies” of the bedroom, “the melodic lines where religion and power, health and illness, body and spirit, love and sex interweave”. This sounds so dreamy and yet so thrilling – thanks in part to Lauren Elkin’s exquisite translation – that you can’t wait to push open the door and get cracking on this search for God, love, rest and death. The search is a lengthy one, since Perrot works across centuries, even millennia, rather than mere decades. She is as comfortable at Versailles watching the elaborate performance that is the Sun King’s daily levée as she is showing the moment when an increasingly famous Simone de Beauvoir decides to give up writing in the Café de Flore (fans keep turning up to stare) and retreat to a sparsely furnished bedsit. Along the way we encounter Breton box beds (basically straw-stuffed coffins without lids into which weary peasants stack themselves tidily every night), swanky hotel mattresses set on fire by Jean Genet’s Gitanes (his publisher Gallimard has to pay the fines), and VW camper vans that have become semi-permanent homes to both the lighthearted and the desperate. Continue reading...
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And the 2018 Braddies go to … Peter Bradshaw's films of the year (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Guardian Film’s official best of the year list – voted for by a panel of reviewers, writers and editors – is into the final furlong. Meanwhile, here are our chief critic’s personal picks See our countdown of the 50 best films of 2018 This year’s awards season peaks here with the publication of the “Braddies” – that is, my personal 10-strong best-of lists for films released this calendar year. These are distinct from the paper’s top 50, and come in the categories best film, best director, best actor, best actress, best supporting actor and actress, best screenplay, best cinematography and best documentary. There are also two new categories this year: best directorial debut and the special Braddie award for the quirkiest film overlooked by the complacent MSM gatekeeper-establishment that may be a future cult classic. (Last year it went unofficially to Gore Verbinski’s A Cure for Wellness, and I am standardising the award this year). As ever, I invite readers to peruse this list and comment on omissions etc below. Continue reading...
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Return to Elm House review – kids let loose on BAC's magical history tour (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Battersea Arts Centre, London Children are given access all areas to explore the old town hall building in this story about Britain’s first female civil servant ‘Why does it say ‘caution, caution, caution’?” Blue, aged eight, is concerned about the yellow tape draped about the Battersea Arts Centre. But this show is all about letting children in, not keeping them out. The caution tape is quickly lifted and the kids are invited inside and given access to all areas. They’re here to explore the history of one extraordinary woman, Jane Nassau Senior, who used to live on this very spot. It isn’t long before the children (ages six and upwards) are leading from the front, charging about the building and gulping up historical facts as they go. The action begins outside the re-created front door of Jane’s home, The Elm House, which is surrounded by rubble and scattered leaves. This is where Britain’s very first female civil servant – Jeanie to her friends – forged her career, helped revolutionise workhouses and kickstarted the notion of foster care. The memory of Jeanie’s work is fading and it’s down to the children to preserve her place in history. We’re split into small groups and led around the venue by an impossibly chirpy Time Keeper. Our Time Keeper for the day, Elizabeth Bartram, does a stellar job at cultivating curiosity in the kids and just about managing to keep them under control. Continue reading...
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Waste not, want not: how your fridge could stop you throwing away food (Thu, 06 Dec 2018)
Food waste: it’s a big problem with far-reaching implications. Here’s how your kitchen could help save the world – from using smart kitchen technology, such as the Samsung Family Hub™, to simple life hacks Most of us feel guilty about wasting food – and the stats are hard to swallow. Roughly one-third of the world’s food is thrown away every year – that’s approximately 1.3bn tonnes, which in turn generates 3.3bn tonnes of greenhouse gases as it rots in landfill. Add to that the huge environmental impact of farming livestock, and the urgency of the issue is pretty clear. A 2016 study by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research showed that tackling food waste is an important way to mitigate climate change. There are financial incentives too. According to Love Food Hate Waste, a family of four could save as much as £70 each month simply by reducing the amount of food it throws away. Continue reading...
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Bolognese and bonding: why I love cooking with my children (Thu, 06 Dec 2018)
With smart appliances like the Samsung Family Hub™ fridge, getting your kids to help out in the kitchen is easier than ever. Mum-of-three Antonia Windsor explains why cooking with your kids is the perfect opportunity for bonding, belly laughs and some stealth maths Related: From coal fires to voice-control fridges: the ever-changing world of the kitchen By the time my middle child Ziggy, now five, was just nine months old he had already joined me in the kitchen. He would sit on the floor with pans while I threw down the potato peelings for him to stir and spoon. I loved this bonding time with him, and proudly posted pictures of him on social media: my chef in the making. My two-year-old Zenya is following in his footsteps, often by my side while I’m chopping, offering up plates of pretend pizza for me to mime eating or cups of imaginary hot chocolate to sip. Continue reading...
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From coal fires to voice-control fridges: the ever-changing world of the kitchen (Thu, 06 Dec 2018)
These days you can talk to your fridge – and it can respond with a playlist and recipe suggestions. So just how did our kitchens get so smart? Chances are, you’re reading this in your kitchen. It’s not only regularly voted the most important room of the house, but it’s also the place we spend more money on than any other – filled, as it is, with the latest smart home technology. For most people, the kitchen is far more than the room where we cook and argue over the washing up. Warm and welcoming, it’s the place where all the best parties end up (Kate Moss even dubbed hers “Club Kitchen”). Continue reading...
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Songs to slice, sauté and sizzle to: three foodies share their favourite tunes (Thu, 06 Dec 2018)
Pass the butter – and a playlist? Music has always been a great accompaniment to food, now – thanks to smart-home technology such as the Samsung Family Hub™ – it’s never been easier to get tunes bubbling away in your kitchen There’s no doubt that music can be conducive to creating culinary magic – whether you chop chips to hip-hop, sauté to Sade or prefer your cooking and soundtrack on the classical side. The link between the two is deep – and well established. A recent study by the University of South Florida found that the music playing in a restaurant could influence diners’ choice of meal – with louder music resulting in higher calorie intake. Meanwhile, scientists have also found that music can even alter how our food tastes, with high-frequency sounds enhancing sweetness. Continue reading...
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20 best Christmas party recipes: part 2 (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
From crowd-pleasing snacks of posh crackling and chickpea fritters to Nigel Slater’s partridge pie, here is our second selection of the best recipes to celebrate Christmas OFM 20 best Christmas party recipes: part 1 Serves 12 apples 500g, Cox or Braeburn preferred, peeled mincemeat 500g Continue reading...
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Les Trois Vallées: great skiing – but away from the bling crowd (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
A new hostel in low-key Les Menuires provides easy access to great ski areas but is more about beanies and live bands than expensive designer gear In Courchevel 1850, there’s an eight-bedroom chalet that costs €295,000 a week. The price includes two chefs, two butlers and a massage therapist, but not helicopter transfers to the resort’s altiport, ski equipment or lift passes. Given that kind of excess, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the Trois Vallées, the biggest linked ski area in the world, was an exclusive, mega-rich enclave. Yet here I am in Les Menuires, just two valleys to the east and on the same lift pass, staying in a bunkhouse-hotel hybrid where a dorm bed costs as little as £22 a night. Continue reading...
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Should you stop eating ‘blood avocados’? (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Some British and Irish restaurants are ditching avocado dishes over concerns about the environment and Mexican drug cartels Avocado on toast might be off the menu. British and Irish restaurants are increasingly ditching them over concerns that Latin American imports are damaging the environment and funding Mexican drug cartels. Growers in Michoacán, west Mexico, have had their land seized by drug lords who are reported to be earning £150m a year by selling the so-called “blood avocados” to British traders. The Wild Strawberry Cafe in Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire, once served 1,000 avocado dishes each week. The owner, Katy Brill, made the “controversial” decision to stop because of ethical concerns over imports, the cartel reports among them. “Primarily I just felt that it didn’t fit with my ethos of using local food,” she says. “If you can eat with the season and source your food locally, that’s always going to be sustainable because it’s not going to have travelled so far.” Continue reading...
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Thomasina Miers’ alternative Christmas canapes: Indian-spiced sausage rolls recipe | The Simple Fix (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
These curry-spiced sausage rolls could grace the Christmas table instead of pigs in blankets, or as canapes for parties Over Christmas, we usually try to throw a lunch party (isn’t seeing the people we love the stuff of life?) and we often visit the Indian sub-continent for inspiration, with my father such an avid fan of Madhur Jaffrey. When the weather is cold, I find that toasting and grinding fragrant spices is warming and comforting – like these fragrant sausage rolls. Continue reading...
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Why is Milk & More insisting I pay in advance? (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
The delivery service’s payment system means a cheque in a bottle is only option The milk delivery service Milk & More is asking us to pay weekly in advance of our orders. We have been with variations of this service (now owned by the German dairy giant Muller) for 63 years but have never been asked to pay this way – that is, before the milk is on the doorstep. On its website, M&M also insists we pay by giving the long number on a debit card. In an informal chat at my bank I was told this was one piece of information you should never allow anyone to use “as and when”. Continue reading...
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I’m in a relationship with another man but he identifies as straight (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
We kiss and cuddle, but he won’t go beyond a certain point physically and says he loves me as a brother. Do we have any hope of a future? Until last year, I identified as a straight man. Then, after we drank too much, I made out with a slightly older colleague, who identifies as a straight man. We now meet to kiss and make out. He doesn’t go beyond a certain point physically. He gives me hand jobs but doesn’t want anything sexual himself, just cuddling and kissing. I love him dearly. He says he loves me, too, but as a brother or best friend, not as a partner. Recently, he has stopped kissing me on the lips but we sleep in the same bed and cuddle. I am confused. Is he straight, is he gay/bi, and should I hope for romantic love with him? I love his company and we do lots together, but he will not go beyond the boundaries he has set. I don’t want to beg him to do more if he doesn’t feel comfortable, but it would hurt to walk away. This man has indicated the kind of relationship he wants, and has established control over your love-making style. But for you, an erotic exchange involves giving pleasure and receiving it. Try not to experience his sexual frugality as a rejection; it could be down to embarrassment, internalised homophobia, self-punishment, fear of transmitting or contracting disease, or erectile or ejaculatory difficulties. He, too, may be confused. He may be unable to grant himself permission to cross that threshold. Consider framing your thoughts as a request, something like: “I respect your boundaries, but would be delighted if you would allow me to give you physical pleasure, too.” If he refuses, press with: “Help me to understand, what kind of feelings do you have about this? Could we talk about it?” Continue reading...
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Tips, links and suggestions: what are you reading this week? (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Your space to discuss the books you are reading and what you think of them Are you on Instagram? Then you can be featured here by tagging your books-related posts with #GuardianBooks Scroll down for our favourite literary links Read more Tips, links and suggestions blogs Welcome to this week’s blogpost. Here’s our roundup of your comments and photos from last week: First up, a treat. BerlinBirdie has been re-reading Old Glory, “Jonathan Raban’s account of sailing down the Mississippi in a small yellow boat”: Continue reading...
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Racism in football: have you witnessed abuse at a match in the UK? (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
After a troubling week with two high-profile incidents in the Premier League, we want to hear from fans Raheem Sterling says sections of the media “fuel racism” in football after being the subject of alleged racist abuse during a Premier League match on Saturday. The England and Manchester City forward wrote on his Instagram account that young black footballers are treated differently to their white counterparts and, because of reporting like this, he expects no better from fans. Related: Raheem Sterling has kicked up a storm but as ever the outrage will pass | Stan Collymore Continue reading...
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Just the two of us: who do you share your home with? (Sat, 10 Nov 2018)
As part of a new series in the Guardian’s Weekend magazine we are looking for interesting pairs who live together Read more from the series We’re looking for unusual partnerships – two people who live together in a way that shows the changing nature of the traditional household – for our new series that seeks to reflect how the place we call home can now include extended family, friends and even strangers. Related: 'I worried my grandson would get into trouble if I didn't take him in' Continue reading...
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Your pictures: share your photos on the theme of 'happy' (Sun, 09 Dec 2018)
Wherever you are in the world, this week we’d like to see your pictures on the theme ‘happy’ The next theme for our weekly photography assignment, published in print in the Observer New Review is ‘happy’ (please note that these are no longer published online). Share your photos of what happy means to you – and tell us about your image in the description box. Continue reading...
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'We could smell the boat approaching': the grim truth about animal exports (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Broken bones and other injuries are common for sheep and cattle held on ships for weeks in cramped pens. Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur tracked the 22,000 arrivals on one boat in Israel’s Haifa port Hundreds of thousands of live animals are transported each year on ships from Australia and Europe to the Middle East. The route from Australia to Israel is particularly long – the journey is three weeks at sea, where cattle and sheep are often kept in cramped pens for the duration. It’s estimated this year Israel will import 114,040 animals (cattle and sheep) from Australia, and 409,123 sheep and 169,991 cattle from Europe. Though these figures are lower than the previous year, in general live imports have been on the rise. Israel is expected to import 700,000 live animals this year – up from 200,000 in 2012. Continue reading...
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Fortnite's new Creative mode: a game-changer (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
In its latest seasonal update, the 200m-selling blockbuster allows players to create their own islands and share them with friends – the response is likely to be huge Every three months something gigantic happens in the lives of 200m video game players: Fortnite Battle Royale starts a new season. The seventh of these launched on Thursday, bringing a variety of additions to the online multiplayer shooting game, but the most important of these is surely the Creative mode, a whole new element that allows players to build their own Fortnite landscapes and share them with the world. For the uninitiated, Fortnite Battle Royale (as opposed to Fortnite Save the World, a linked but different version of the game) puts 100 players on an island together where they must search for guns and equipment and then fight until only one player remains. They begin on a large island filled with houses, shops, factories and sports arenas, but a huge storm rolls in progressively through the game, forcing combatants into an ever smaller area. The visuals are bright, brash and cartoony, and the locations are silly, from fast-food joints with enormous burger-headed statues, to toilet factories and spooky castles. It’s like playing Call of Duty in a world created by the Scooby Doo art team. Continue reading...
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‘Hardest time of the year’: the students who will spend Christmas alone (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
When university halls empty as students flock to their families, care leavers face a different festive season Luke Collinson, a 19-year-old care leaver, knows he has defied all the odds by enrolling at Manchester University this year. So when his fellow students disappear this weekend to celebrate Christmas with their families, leaving him in a silent hall of residence, he insists he won’t be feeling sorry for himself. At 15, after being unable to go to school for years because of family problems, Collinson taught himself to read. Shortly afterwards he was taken into care, and despite being predicted Us and Fs, with the help of a social services laptop he passed 10 GCSEs with good grades. Continue reading...
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Colombia journalism project aims to bring untold stories of war to light (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Reporting was restricted by the remoteness of the war zones and the military’s control of access. Peace is allowing a new approach Like many urban Colombians, Nicolás Sánchez – a young journalist from the country’s capital, Bogotá – never saw the country’s civil war firsthand. Instead, he grew up watching it from afar, in television reports of massacres and gun battles deep in the countryside. Reporters would often only show the point of view of the military – the only group who could regularly grant them access to the battlefield. Rural Colombians, who bore the brunt of conflict, were often ignored; coverage instead focused on urban incidents such as kidnappings of public figures and attacks against government buildings. Continue reading...
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The Garrick Club might finally admit women. But why would any woman want to go there? | Chitra Ramaswamy (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
As the 187-year-old club once again discusses whether to admit women, it is eye-opening to discover how they view ‘ladies’ Women, or to use the correct anachronistic language “ladies”, rest assured. One more door might perhaps – but probably not – be one day creaking ever so slightly ajar to admit some of us. (Though not welcoming us, understand.) While we busy ourselves despairing over the fact that 27 countries still require women to obey their husbands by law, the Garrick Club has been pondering the deeply divisive question of whether to permit female members. Again. Honestly, this so-called question – which, no joke, has led incensed members to rip pages from leather-bound ledgers and to snip out a woman’s name written in the Garrick’s hallowed candidates’ book with a pair of scissors – seems to come around as often as MasterChef these days. Except the format is more predictable. Really it’s a wonder how the 1,400 members of this 187-year-old bastion of white male privilege have any time left for the banter, shoulder-rubbing, dissection of objective facts, consumption of whisky and off-the-cuff networking after so much energy is spent considering whether the club would be critically endangered by the paid-up presence of a lady. Continue reading...
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Turning Berlin's grey to green: going wild in the city's abandoned sites – cartoon (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
As part of our new series, the illustrated city, we explore Berlin’s hidden spaces of Berlin, where (like the city’s parties) the flora is wild – if you know where to look ... Continue reading...
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Hackney marshes, markets, moonlight and motherhood – in pictures (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
A new book, East London Photo Stories, combines the work of 14 acclaimed photographers to bring a vibrant area of the capital to life Continue reading...
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Lyon's festival of lights: before and after – in pictures (Tue, 11 Dec 2018)
Lyon’s Fête des Lumières is the world’s largest visual arts festival. It takes place over four nights every December and attracts millions of visitors from all over the world. Our photographer Alicia Canter visited the city twice to see the remarkable transformation Reflets by Damien Fontaine Continue reading...
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Agency photographer of the year – 2018 shortlist (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
Guardian picture editors pick a selection of photographers who have stood out over the course of 2018. An overall winner will be announced on 21 December The Guardian receives millions of images each year from news agencies. Here are some of the photographers whose body of work over the course of the year has stood out to the picture desk. Continue reading...
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Fashion awards and a Chinese guard of honour: Monday's best photos (Mon, 10 Dec 2018)
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you photo highlights from around the world Continue reading...
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The big picture: New Yorkers ice-skate into the 1960s (Sun, 09 Dec 2018)
The Observer and Guardian photographer Neil Libbert’s winter shot of Central Park remains one of his favourites decades on Neil Libbert, who has worked for the Observer and the Guardian for nearly 60 years, took this photograph of ice-skaters in Central Park in December 1960. It appeared on the front page of the Guardian on the last day of that month, referencing a long cold snap in New York City that ran beyond John F Kennedy’s inauguration the following January. Libbert took the photo at the very end of a four-month trip across the country, starting in Oregon, accompanying the celebrated Guardian journalist WJ Weatherby. The photographer was 22 years old. He stayed in the Chelsea Hotel for $5 a night and walked the streets most of the day, up to Harlem and back to Greenwich Village, enthralled by what he saw. Continue reading...
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The photography of Hannah Starkey – in pictures (Sat, 08 Dec 2018)
For more than 20 years, Belfast-born Hannah Starkey’s artfully constructed portraits have captured the gestures of everyday female experience. Here we show highlights from a stunning new monograph published by Mack Photographs 1997–2017 by Hannah Starkey is out now (Mack, £40) • Hannah Starkey: ‘I wanted to create a space for women without judgment’ Continue reading...
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