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The Guardian

Most children in UK's poorest areas now growing up in poverty (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
End Child Poverty says years-long freeze on benefits is major factor in emerging crisis More than half of all children in the UK’s very poorest areas are now growing up in poverty as the impact of cuts to benefits continues to be felt by the least well-off families, according to a new study. An analysis published by the End Child Poverty coalition of charities shows that the biggest increases in child poverty in the past two years have occurred in areas already identified as deprivation hotspots. Continue reading...
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Paradise Papers firm worked for bank linked to terrorist financing and organised crime (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Appleby client FBME is banned from US financial system The firm at the heart of the Paradise Papers leak provided offshore services to a bank accused of facilitating terrorist financing, transnational organised crime and the Syrian government’s chemical weapons programme. Appleby represented the Cayman Islands holding company of FBME Bank for at least a year after the US Treasury published an extraordinary roster of allegations against the bank, and acted as its agent for more than a decade beforehand. Continue reading...
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Rex Tillerson: Russia bears responsibility for Syria chemical attacks (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
US secretary of state says Russia ‘shielding’ Syrian ally, amid reports of fresh gas attack Russia bears the ultimate responsibility for suspected chemical weapons attacks committed by the Syrian regime, the US secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, has said. Tillerson’s comments came a day after reports of a fresh chemical weapons attack in the rebel enclave of East Ghouta, which injured more than 20 people, most of them children. Continue reading...
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Phil Neville hit by Twitter storm soon after landing England women’s job (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
• He deletes account as dubious tweets he is said to have sent emerge • Former Everton captain ‘honoured’ to be named women’s coach Phil Neville says he feels “honoured” to have been given the job of coaching the England women’s team but his appointment immediately became embroiled in controversy after highly dubious tweets Neville appears to have sent a few years ago began to circulate, with one making light of domestic violence. The message, which was posted via Neville’s long-standing Twitter handle @fizzer18 on 1 July 2011, reads: “Relax I’m back chilled – just battered the wife!!! Feel better now!” Another from the same account, and which was sent on 3 December 2012, reads: “U women of [sic] always wanted equality until it comes to paying the bills #hypocrites”. Continue reading...
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Doctors blocked by Home Office from taking up vital NHS jobs (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Recruits from overseas not being paid enough to satisfy immigration rules Seniors doctors from overseas who have been appointed to fill key roles in hospitals around the UK are being blocked from taking up their jobs by the Home Office because their NHS salaries are too low under immigration rules. The Guardian has learned of at least 20 doctors prevented from taking up posts in departments including intensive care in the past two months, causing anger and bewilderment among already stretched doctors. Continue reading...
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Prescription drug addiction: government launches investigation (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Public Health England will review prescription of medicines including opioid painkillers The government has ordered an investigation into the growing problem of addiction to prescription drugs such as painkillers and medicines to treat anxiety and insomnia. Steve Brine, the public health minister, has acted after it emerged that one in 11 (8.9%) patients treated by the NHS in England last year was given a drug that can induce dependency. Continue reading...
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Cape Town to run out of water by 12 April amid worst drought in a century (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Residents will have to queue at standpipes for daily rations unless they drastically reduce consumption As Cape Town suffers its worst drought in a century, residents have been warned that they face losing piped water to their homes on 12 April – nine days earlier than predicted. If drastic consumption reductions are not achieved by “Day Zero”, people will have to queue at 200 standpipes for daily rations of 25 litres (6.6 US gallons), residents were told on Tuesday. Continue reading...
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MP calls for tougher laws after women 'groped' at charity gala (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Equalities chair says act needs ‘real teeth’ after allegations about men-only event The chair of the parliamentary committee on women and equalities, Maria Miller MP, has suggested strengthening the Equalities Act, after details emerged of a men-only charity dinner – attended by senior figures from business and politics – at which hired “hostesses” were allegedly groped, sexually harassed and propositioned by guests. Senior female politicians lined up to condemn “stomach-churning” behaviour by attendees of the Presidents Club charity dinner, held at London’s exclusive Dorchester hotel and hosted by comedian David Walliams. Continue reading...
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Two planets in unusual star system are very likely habitable, scientists say (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Exoplanets orbiting Trappist-1 have thrilled astronomers since their discovery last year thanks to their Earth-like potential to harbor water Scientists have identified two planets circling round a dim dwarf star as especially likely candidates to have habitable conditions, with probable water and a source of heat, attributes thought necessary for life beyond Earth. Since their discovery last year, the seven planets and their star, called Trappist-1, have thrilled astronomers hunting for a world resembling Earth. Never before had scientists found so many Earth-sized planets around a single star, or in a zone where the extreme temperatures of space would not obliterate the chances of life. Continue reading...
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Trump to invite France's Macron for administration's first official state visit (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Trump is first US president in decades not to hold showy ceremony during his first year in office Donald Trump will invite the French president, Emmanuel Macron, on the first state visit of the Trump administration, the White House confirmed Tuesday. Trump is the first US president in decades to wrap up his opening year without offering a counterpart the honor of a state visit, a diplomatic tool used to impress and showcase ties between allies. Continue reading...
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Massacres and protest: Australia Day's undeniable history (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
The 26 January debate started with Indigenous people wanting the brutal past acknowledged On 26 January 1838, a group of mounted police under the instruction of the colonial government led a surprise attack on a camp of Kamilaroi people at Waterloo Creek in northern New South Wales, killing at least 40. It was the 50th anniversary of the planting of the Union Jack in Sydney Cove. As the massacre took place, a celebratory regatta was held in Sydney, 480km away, to mark the colony’s jubilee. Continue reading...
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Ursula K Le Guin, sci-fi and fantasy author, dies at 88 (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
The multi award-winning writer of The Left Hand of Darkness and A Wizard of Earthsea has died at her home in Portland, Oregon Ursula K Le Guin, the award-winning fantasy and science fiction author, has died at the age of 88. Le Guin’s books have sold millions worldwide and won her a number of prestigious accolades, including Hugo and Nebula awards for her 1969 novel The Left Hand of Darkness. Continue reading...
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Oscar nominations 2018: a cautious, comfort-food list in Trumpian times (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The Shape of Water leads a nominations list that offers up exotic fantasy and imagined past, but is missing something truly ferocious and polarising Full list of nominations for the 2018 Oscars The alchemy has bubbled, the mysterious tipping point has been achieved, and the Academy Awards consensus is coalescing around Guillermo del Toro’s swooning sci-fi romance The Shape of Water, with 13 nominations. That’s way ahead of Christopher Nolan’s colossal cine-installation Dunkirk (eight nominations), and Martin McDonagh’s fierce tragicomedy Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (seven). Then there is Joe Wright’s rousing wartime drama Darkest Hour, featuring Gary Oldman’s tremendous Churchill turn, which gets six – and so does Paul Thomas Anderson’s glorious drama Phantom Thread, which is my favourite of this list so far. Denis Villeneuve’s futurist dystopian spectacular Blade Runner 2049 comes in with five — and this must surely be the year for cinematographer Roger Deakins, although this gets no best picture nomination. Five too for Dee Rees’s Mudbound and the much-loved Lady Bird, and it’s a huge relief to see Greta Gerwig get her best director nomination, putting a stop to the stag-invite stigma that had recently attached to this list. Jordan Peele’s exquisitely nasty race satire Get Out has four, along with Star Wars: The Last Jedi, and Luca Guadagnino’s passionate love story Call Me By Your Name, one of which is for Timothée Chalamet’s tremendous lead performance as one of the lovers. Continue reading...
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Westminster council rejects Margaret Thatcher statue plans (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Proposals thrown out partly due to fears protesters were likely to target the memorial Councillors have rejected a proposal for a statue of Margaret Thatcher on Parliament Square in central London. Westminster council turned down a plan last July for a bronze likeness of the former prime minister, measuring one-and-a-half times lifesize and dressed in state robes. The applicants wanted the statue to be looking towards parliament, but it was rejected, partly due to fears about possible vandalism. It was also felt that it could become a magnet for protesters Continue reading...
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Que sera, sera, Hunt's Brexit complacency strikes fear into committee | John Crace (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
If the government got a deal, all would be well for the NHS. If not, something would turn up “I’m Jeremy Hunt, the health secretary.” Hunt said by way of introduction. Before pausing and correcting himself. “I’m Jeremy Hunt, the health and social care secretary.” It was an easy mistake to make. Since Christmas, several cabinet ministers have been more interested in doing any job other than the one the prime minister wanted them to do – and it’s been hard to keep track of who’s doing what. Continue reading...
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The end of road rage? A car which detects emotions (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Scientists are developing sensors which can understand feelings, in a bid to make driving safer The potential for cars to tune into their driver’s emotions is being explored by manufacturers, who believe a car which understands feelings could make driving safer. Researchers hope to integrate biometric sensors into cars, allowing the vehicle to understand when a driver is tired or stressed. It could then issue prompts or alerts, or potentially take over the wheel in extreme circumstances. Continue reading...
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Murdoch's Sky bid: what next for the media heavyweight? (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
After the regulators say deal is against the public interest, what are Rupert Murdoch’s options? The UK competition regulator investigating Rupert Murdoch’s £11.7bn bid has said the deal is against the public interest because it would give the Murdoch family “too much control over news providers in the UK, and too much influence over public opinion and the political agenda”. The deal, which would see Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox buy the 61% of Sky it does not already own, would add full control of Sky News to Murdoch assets which include the Sun, Times, Sunday Times and Wall Street Journal. Continue reading...
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‘We believed he would be in jail for life’: the story behind John Worboys’ imminent – and baffling – release (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Nearly nine years after he was convicted of sex attacks on 12 women, the so-called black cab rapist could be freed from prison this week. For victims, some of whom still live in fear of a man who has been linked to hundreds more assaults, the question remains – why? The plan includes decoy cars, false leads, lookalikes and aliases. Drawn up in secret, it outlines the release from a high-security prison of a man whose new legal name is John Radford, an inmate adept in the art of manipulation and deceit. The prisoner, whose crimes led him to be jailed alongside the country’s most serious sex offenders, has been known as Tony, Paul, Terry the Minder – his porn actor pseudonym – and by his real name, John Worboys. Continue reading...
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No big ideas will be coming from Theresa May – and her Tory enemies know it | Anne Perkins (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
MPs pretend they’re trying to help the stricken prime minister, but in truth they are preparing the wicket to bowl her out Theresa May’s unique quality as a politician is her capacity to endure. It is an unusual attribute, this soldiering-on thing. Modern politicians are like Icarus, bench-tested against the zillion-degree temperature of public opinion almost before they have found their way to their office. But May does not fit the mould of the modern politician. She has been an MP for 20 years. For nearly 19 of them, she kept her head down. Occasionally, she lifted off. Then she bumped discreetly back to earth. Related: Theresa May told to 'raise her game' in Tory MP's outburst Continue reading...
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Steve Bell on Boris Johnson's briefing about the NHS – cartoon (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
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The Guardian view on NHS funding: no platform for Boris Johnson | Editorial (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The foreign secretary may be grandstanding, but there is a need for more money, invested in making healthcare sustainable The foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, has been parading in the headlines for a week now, mostly on matters that are no part of his departmental brief. In the 24 hours before today’s cabinet meeting, he and his allies were briefing that he would demand an extra £5bn a year for the NHS. It did not go to plan: slapped down by the prime minister, afterwards it was suggested he was told to stop briefing; in the end no figure was even mentioned. But then the intervention was about Mr Johnson’s ambition, not the NHS. He is playing politics with the health service to enhance his own standing. Nothing new there. Yet he is right about two things. The state of the NHS is doing grave political harm to the Tories: that is borne out by every recent polling report. And there is an urgent need for more cash. The difficulty is that, across the UK, every part of the health service is under such pressure that when the Treasury does dole out a little extra, it ends up – as a report on sustainability from the National Audit Office showed last week – papering over the cracks instead of making the health system work better. Continue reading...
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Oversharing has its perils, but telling all about my mother worked for me | John Sutherland (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
I don’t share Nigel Slater’s guilt about using my memoir to expose my mother’s faults. It made me feel better about things Nigel Slater has professed guilty feelings to the Radio Times for “oversharing” about his stepmother. She is portrayed in Slater’s bestselling memoir-novel, Toast, and was played on screen by Helena Bonham Carter in a popular adaptation. A theatrical version is apparently on its way. It’s an interesting choice of word. “Sharing” is what baring-the-breast participants do in 12-step meetings. It’s like the Catholic confessional – what you say doesn’t leave the box. Or, as the Alcoholics Anonymous chair says: “What’s said in the room stays in the room.” Continue reading...
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We need a reality check: facts and figures alone won’t stop Brexit | Nicky Hawkins (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Stats and studies are not enough. Progressives must realise that voters are won over by narratives, not numbers With the Brexit debate still raging and a stream of bewildering news emanating from the Trump administration, progressives on both sides of the Atlantic are floundering, struggling to make sense of a world that was unthinkable just a couple of years ago. Their failure to win over hearts and minds has been critical in shaping events in the last few years. Progressive campaigning efforts largely haven’t worked, and are still not working. Since the EU referendum, little has changed in the tone and tenor of the public conversation on Brexit. In the run-up to the vote, the remain campaign desperately tried to take to task the leave campaign’s claim that exiting the EU would free up £350m a week for the NHS. The urge to set the record straight, call out “fake news” and counter false information has not subsided since then. Continue reading...
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Nappy libraries and glass milk bottles: past ideas for a plastic-free future | Lucy Siegle (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
To emulate forward-thinking Penzance, now plastic-free, we should hark back to yesteryear. A few choice items could curb a ruinous plastic habit Plastic is firmly out of fashion, with everyone from the government to supermarkets pledging to reduce use and fight pollution. But turning the tide will require a herculean effort. The US shale gas boom means that the price of feedstock for the plastic industry has plummeted. Major chemical corporations have invested $180bn in new production facilities to come on stream in the next 10 years, increasing global output by 40%. If we don’t want it to flow our way, we need to stand firm. I’ve just returned from Penzance, designated the UK’s first plastic-free town by Surfers Against Sewage. This weekend it hosted residents from Aberporth, west Wales, with aspirations to follow suit; shop and cafe owners discussed the best solutions for denting the UK’s annual 3.7m-tonne plastic habit (2.2m of that being packaging). It was an impressive display of what we might refer to as the Dunkirk spirit. Continue reading...
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Aly Raisman launches attack on US Olympic Committee over Nassar abuse (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Olympic champion says USOC has shown ‘zero accountability’ Larry Nassar faces 125 years in jail for sexually abusing athletes Aly Raisman has launched a withering attack on the US Olympic Committee as the sentence hearing for former USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar continues in a Michigan courtroom. Nassar has admitted to sexually abusing young gymnasts in his care. More than 100 girls and women – including Raisman and her fellow Olympic champions Simone Biles, Gabby Douglas and McKayla Maroney – have come forward to say they are survivors of his crimes. On Monday, USA Gymnastics announced three of its board members had resigned over the scandal. Raisman has repeatedly criticised USA Gymnastics’ handling of Nassar’s case but on Monday night she also called out the USOC for taking credit for the resignations. Continue reading...
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Sergio Agüero guides Manchester City to Wembley despite Bristol City rally (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Manchester City remain on course to compete for silverware on four fronts this season and the first of those trophies is now within touching distance. Pep Guardiola’s team will face Arsenal or Chelsea in the Carabao Cup final at Wembley on 25 February after another masterclass from Kevin De Bruyne brought Bristol City’s terrific run to the semi-finals to a memorable end. De Bruyne, who signed a new five-and-a-half-year contract 24 hours before this second leg, scored the winner with the last kick of the game but it was the wonderful assist for Sergio Agüero, four minutes after the interval, that took the breath away on a night when Bristol City refused to go quietly. Continue reading...
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Kyle Edmund ready to test his nerve in Australian Open semi-final (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Briton reflects on tense quarter-final win over Dimitrov Marin Cilic awaits on Thursday after Nadal retires Kyle Edmund may or may not be the nerveless ingenu he some times appears, immune to outside distractions, whatever the occasion, but he is about to get the chance to prove it. The occasion here on Thursday night will test his nerves: a debut slam semi-final against world No 6, Marin Cilic, who had to hold focus as Rafael Nadal collapsed in front of him with a hip injury in the fifth set of their quarter-final. Continue reading...
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Sam Curran gets England T20 call as Chris Woakes calls for ODI whitewash (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
• Ben Stokes situation opens door for teenage Surrey all-rounder • Woakes urges England to keep their foot on Australia’s throat Sam Curran has been added to England’s Twenty20 squad for the tri-series with Australia and New Zealand. The 19-year-old Surrey all-rounder has been drafted in owing to the continued uncertainty around Ben Stokes’ availability and the fact Joe Root will take a break. Stokes, who was set to come out for the New Zealand leg of the series, is due to appear in court on an affray charge on 13 February. That date clashes with England’s game against New Zealand in Wellington which the England and Wales Cricket Board had earmarked for the 26-year-old’s international comeback. Continue reading...
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Alexis Sánchez’s wages out of Chelsea’s league, says Antonio Conte (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
• Chelsea cannot match financial might of Manchester’s Big Two • Conte: ‘We’ll have to make a success not with money but with work’ Chelsea and Arsenal will go head to head on Wednesday for a place in the Carabao Cup final with Antonio Conte admitting neither team can compete financially with the might of the two Manchester clubs. The Premier League champions had never been in contention to sign Alexis Sánchez this month, despite declaring an interest last summer, after it became clear the forward’s wage demands – he is believed to command a basic salary of around £300,000 a week – and agent fees would be prohibitive. Manchester City drew the same conclusion, with Manchester United, who made the most money of any club in the world last year, finalising a deal on Monday. Continue reading...
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Caster Semenya and Dutee Chand run ragged by IAAF’s moving goalposts | Andy Bull (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Semenya and Chand will race at the Commonwealth Games in April but their fight for the right of hyperandrogenic athletes to compete is far from over It’s been just under six months since Caster Semenya ran at the world championships, which makes it just over five since the last time everyone was talking about intersex athletes in sport. The media cycle moves along but the debate goes on. Last Friday the court of arbitration for sport released details of the latest developments in the crucial case of Dutee Chand v the IAAF. Semenya became the public face of the fight for the rights of hyperandrogenic athletes because she is so successful. But it’s Chand, a 21-year-old Indian sprinter, whose lawyers have been prosecuting the argument against the IAAF’s policies. Chand was born in Gopalpur in Jaipur in 1996, one of seven children in a family that lived below the poverty line. She always loved to sprint. They say when she was a kid she spent so much time running that the neighbours thought she was crazy. When she was 10 she won a spot at a government-run sports hostel and in her teens she broke local, state, and national records in the 100m and 200m. In 2014, aged 18, she was picked in the India relay squad for the Commonwealth Games in Glasgow. And then she was dropped from it when tests showed her natural testosterone levels were higher than the International Association of Athletics Federations allowed. Continue reading...
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Dan Biggar to miss Wales’ first three Six Nations games with shoulder injury (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
• Outside-half hurt playing for Ospreys against Clermont Auvergne • Wales without five Lions going into first match against Scotland Dan Biggar will miss the first three rounds of the Six Nations next month after suffering a shoulder injury playing for Ospreys at Clermont Auvergne on Sunday. He is the second Wales outside-half to be ruled out after last week’s withdrawal of Rhys Priestland. Biggar, a Lion in New Zealand last summer, suffered the injury at the end of Ospreys’ defeat in France, yelling out in pain after the flanker Fritz Lee charged into his right shoulder as he guarded a ruck. He left the ground with his arm in a sling and was assessed when he linked up with Wales on Monday. Continue reading...
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‘It matters more when there is money on it’ is a dangerous indoctrination | David Conn (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Relentless marketing, advertising and sponsorship by betting companies is exposing fans to the threat of a gambling addiction on an unprecedented scale and needs curtailing Joey Barton, whose football career was in effect ended early by his suspension last year for gambling, now says the ban on players betting is hypocritical given the game’s dependence on gambling sponsorship and that half of all players could be breaching the rule anyway. He sharply made that point at the time of his 18-month ban last April, later reduced to 13 months; pointing out the Football Association, which solemnly imposed the suspension on him, was sponsored by Ladbrokes. Barton argues the rule, which is aimed at preventing match-fixing, is too absolute, because players like him casually or even addictively gambling on matches are a world away from taking money to throw or fix games. But given huge wages and match-fixing’s existential danger, there will be no moves to relax the rules. The FA and leagues may see Barton’s protest as a sign the ban is hurting, so it must be working. Continue reading...
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56,000 people flee as Philippines volcano spews lava – video (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
The Philippines' most active volcano has started spewing fountains of red-hot lava and massive ash plumes as 56,000 villagers flee to evacuation centres. Lava fountains gushed 700 metres (2,300ft) above Mount Mayon's crater and ash plumes rose up to 3km (1.9 miles), according to the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology. Continue reading...
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Trump's 'global gag rule': how women are fighting back – video (lun., 22 janv. 2018)
One year after Donald Trump reinstated a ban on US aid funding for overseas organisations that provide abortion services, opposition is mounting. Rallying under the banner She Decides, women around the world have united to bridge the funding gap created by the US president’s expanded version of the ‘global gag rule’, which has already forced the closure of hundreds of clinics that provided life-saving family planning services Continue reading...
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One year on, has Trump kept his promise? A Pennsylvania county gives its verdict – video (sam., 20 janv. 2018)
Members of Donald Trump's base in Northampton County, which supported him in 2016 after twice backing Barack Obama, remain passionate – but some voters appear to be moving away from the president. Continue reading...
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Rally against sexual harassment held in London – video (dim., 21 janv. 2018)
Crowds gathered in central London on Sunday to protest against sexual harassment and support the Time’s Up movement that was launched in the US. Helen Pankhurst, a women's rights activist and the great-granddaughter of the suffragette leader Emmeline Pankhurst, addressed the rally and called for 2018 to be the year that inequality is stamped out Continue reading...
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Jacinda Ardern is not the first world leader to be pregnant in office – video report (ven., 19 janv. 2018)
Jacinda Ardern, the prime minister of New Zealand, has announced she is pregnant. The last time an elected world leader was pregnant in office was in 1990 when Pakistan's prime minister, Benazir Bhutto, had her daughter Bakhtwar Jacinda Ardern: New Zealand prime minister announces first pregnancy Continue reading...
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Donald Trump's first year: in his own words - video (jeu., 18 janv. 2018)
Donald Trump's first year as US president has seen a daily battle with the media, a federal investigation into his campaign team and a series of domestic and diplomatic bust-ups. In his own inimitable way he describes the events as he sees them Continue reading...
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Rokhaya Diallo: 'As a black woman, my freedom of speech didn't have value' (mer., 17 janv. 2018)
Rokhaya Diallo is a French journalist and activist who was appointed to the CNNum, the national digital council at the end of last year. Her appointment sparked controversy due to some of her opinions about state racism and Charlie Hebdo, and the French government bowed to pressure to remove her from the board. She speaks with Iman Amrani about what happened, how she feels President Emmanuel Macron, and freedom of speech Une version de la vidéo en français peut être visionnée ici Continue reading...
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Sucker punch: small town boxing in rural America is going mainstream - but who benefits? (mar., 16 janv. 2018)
Rough N Rowdy offers local hopefuls, most with limited skills and little training, the chance to win $1,000 and make a name for themselves in the boxing ring. The event is being broadcast by Barstool Sports, whose CEO, Dave Portnoy, refers to boxers taking part as 'rednecks'  A puncher's chance: amateur fight event offers a desperate swing at glory Continue reading...
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Drone rescues swimmers in Australia in world first – video (jeu., 18 janv. 2018)
Help came from the air for two teenage swimmers struggling in powerful surf, in what the local authorities called a 'world first'. A member of the public spotted the 16- and 17-year-old boys caught in a rip current in rough seas off Lennox Head, a New South Wales beach popular with surfers. A Westpac Little Ripper Lifesaver drone was quickly launched and directed to their location, where it deployed a life raft then used by the pair to get back to safety. Australia, whose 24 million people live mostly on the coast, had 291 drowning deaths in the year ending 30 June 2017 Continue reading...
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We Have Lift-off | Made In Stoke-on-Trent (lun., 15 janv. 2018)
Stoke-on-Trent residents are fed up with it being known as the 'Brexit capital of Britain'. After being swamped by negative media stories during the referendum and recent byelection, local people are fighting back against the stereotypes Tell us what you think of our documentary series Watch all the episodes here  Continue reading...
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£1 for a house: made in Stoke-on-Trent (lun., 15 janv. 2018)
This is the Portland street estate, a community ravaged by years of cuts. The council made a bold move in an attempt to turn the estate around – but how did the £1 homes experiment turn out? Watch all the episodes here  Continue reading...
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Prevail | Made in Stoke-on-Trent (lun., 15 janv. 2018)
Stoke-on-Trent’s cultural quarter is growing fast, with an independent and DIY spirit, but how does this affect the rest of the city? An answer is found in the remarkable story of Vixta, an artist about to go public for the first time Watch all the episodes here  Continue reading...
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A Potted History | Made In Stoke-on-Trent (lun., 15 janv. 2018)
Paladin Works is a time capsule of a building that embodies the history of Stoke-on-Trent. It began life as a pottery factory, but since that went bust it has hosted manufacturing, sales teams and even a cannabis farm. Does it hold the key to Stoke's future? Tell us what you think of our documentary series Watch all the episodes here  Continue reading...
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Black Men Walking: a hilly hike through 500 years of black British history (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
A new play by the rapper Testament was inspired by a walking group from Yorkshire. Our writer steps out with them on a trek across the wild, windswept moors On the first Saturday of the month, at 9.30am sharp, the men meet just outside Sheffield and head for the Peak District. “By the time we’ve finished,” says 57-year-old Rob, “we haven’t got any stress because we’ve walked and talked it away. That’s one of the beauties of this group.” The men come from a wide cross-section of the African diaspora in Britain. Thirteen years ago, there was just a handful of them, but that’s swelled to about 30, including the occasional woman. Today, on a cold January morning, I’m joining them on a six-mile route around Stanage Edge, a gritstone escarpment in Hathersage, to find out more about the group and the play they have inspired. When the Ghanaian journalist Maxwell Ayamba co-founded 100 Black Men Walk for Health in 2004, he had one simple aim: get black men walking. “Most black men get to middle age and lead this kind of sedentary life,” says Ayamba. “We are susceptible to all kinds of diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure, vitamin D deficiency.” Research suggests African-Caribbean men are also more likely to experience mental illness. Continue reading...
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Hugh Masekela obituary: South African jazz pioneer who fought the evil of apartheid (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Trumpeter and singer-songwriter who was a propulsive force in jazz in South Africa and a tireless campaigner against apartheid in exile Hugh Masekela, who has died aged 78, was one of the world’s finest and most distinctive horn players, whose performing on trumpet and flugelhorn mixed jazz with South African styles and music from across the African continent and diaspora. Exiled from his country for 30 years, he was also a powerful singer and songwriter and an angry political voice, using his music and live performances to attack the apartheid regime that had banished him from his homeland. Related: Hugh Masekela: life and career of the jazz trumpeter – in pictures Continue reading...
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Late-night hosts on shutdown: 'America gets caught in the stairwell by the landlord' (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Stephen Colbert, Trevor Noah and Jimmy Kimmel, addressed the end of the government shutdown and this weekend’s women’s marches Late-night hosts on Monday night discussed the end of the three-day government shutdown after Democrats and Republicans agreed to fund the government for three weeks. Continue reading...
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Lagerfeld still top of his game with blooming 2018 Chanel collection (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Flowers were ever-present at summer 2018 Paris show, where designer revealed a new look In politics, a rose garden strategy refers to an incumbent candidate using the trappings of office to project an aura of power for the purpose of re-election. Karl Lagerfeld, who has presided over Chanel with an air of kingly invincibility since 1983, has been using the method for years. The awe-inspiring catwalk shows he stages for Chanel each fashion week – think space rockets that actually take off, full-size replicas of the Eiffel Tower, real icebergs – have successfully quelled any desire for change by inspiring shock, awe and simple devotion. Continue reading...
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Beirut review – Jon Hamm impresses in intelligent 80s-set spy thriller (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The Mad Men veteran plays another fast-talking protagonist in a smart and complex tale that has echoes of John le Carré In an unexpected twist, Sundance has become the launch pad for what 20 years ago was very mainstream fodder: the mid-budget, fairly smart international spy film. We saw it in 2014 with Philip Seymour Hoffman starring in the adaptation of John le Carré’s A Most Wanted Man, and we have it again this year with Beirut, which, when it is working well, is of Le Carré caliber. This isn’t a particularly chancy film, unless the decision to go old school is considered such. It is still, however, quite good. Related: Ophelia review – Daisy Ridley stranded in disastrous Hamlet reimagining Continue reading...
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Ophelia review – Daisy Ridley stranded in disastrous Hamlet reimagining (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
A shift in point of view reframes Shakespeare’s tragedy but the novelty wears off instantaneously with bizarre additions and a lack of emotional engagement If a producer cornered me in an elevator and pitched “Hamlet, but from Ophelia’s point of view, and we’ve got Daisy Ridley in the lead”, I’d sell everything I had to invest. And I’d probably make a killing, as Claire McCarthy’s Ophelia is going to cut into one heck of a trailer. But to thine own self one must be true. Related: The Miseducation of Cameron Post review – prayers answered with conversion therapy drama Continue reading...
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How Azzedine Alaïa changed the way we see women's bodies (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The Tunisian designer died in November, but with his first London boutique opening ahead of a major UK exhibition in May, his work has long proved to be far ahead of its time The king is dead; long live the king. Azzedine Alaïa’s heart failed last November, but his presence will be more keenly felt in Britain this year than ever before. A major exhibition opens at the Design Museum in May, with his first London boutique coming to New Bond Street before that. After the outpouring of emotion on his death – from Naomi Campbell, who lived with him as a teenage model and always called him Papa; from the Parisian great-and-good who ate couscous at his table; from the clients who worshipped how he made them look – 2018 will be the year when Alaïa is recognised not just as the man who changed what models wore, but as the man who changed what we all wore. “For me, fashion is the body,” Alaïa said in 1982. The rest of us took a little while to catch up, but we certainly got there in the end. Since the mid-80s, the skin and curve and flesh and muscle of women’s bodies have been the beating heart of how we want to look, with the role of fabric being to enhance that. That was how Alaïa saw it from the start. “I make clothes, women make fashion,” he would say, or: “I am not a designer, I am a couturier.” What he was saying, every time, was that it was the body that mattered most. Continue reading...
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Who is Jack Brooksbank – and will you be paying for his wedding to Princess Eugenie? (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The former manager of Mahiki nightclub has been congratulated on his recent engagement – with particular enthusiasm from the Duchess of York Name: Jack Brooksbank. Age: 31. Continue reading...
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Nigel Slater’s cauliflower slices with horseradish recipe (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Crispy, seedy, crunchy and creamy, a winter winter full of warmth and health Warm 500ml of vegetable stock in a medium saucepan. Trim 1kg of cauliflower then cut into steaks, about 2cm thick. Lower these into the boiling stock, then reduce the heat, so that the stock simmers. Partially cover the pan with a lid, then leave to cook until soft enough to pierce effortlessly with a skewer – a matter of 15 minutes or so. Continue reading...
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Should I go for a promotion that risks annoying a difficult colleague? (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Have you got a work-related problem? In a new series we invite you to send in a short description of your predicament – so that other readers can offer solutions My boss is about to be promoted and suggested that I might want to apply for his old job. However, if I were to do this, I would be leapfrogging another colleague who is senior to me. The colleague can be prickly; we already have a slightly strained relationship. Is it worth me going for the post (there would be a substantial salary increase and better future prospects, although probably a bit more stress), despite the fact that whether I get it or not, my colleague may bear me a grudge? I don’t need the extra salary; I can make ends meet on mine, no problem; but obviously it would be nice to have. I’m bearing in mind that in the worst case scenario, my colleague, knowing I tried for the post, becomes my boss. • When leaving a message on this page, please be sensitive to the fact that you are responding to a real person in the grip of a real-life dilemma, who wrote to Working It Out asking for help, and may well view your comments here. Continue reading...
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Apple HomePod finally available to buy, three years after the Echo (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Company’s delayed, £319 smart speaker pitched as music-first wireless speaker that can be voice-controlled via Siri Apple’s delayed £319 HomePod smart speaker will finally be available to buy on Friday in the UK, US and Australia. The 17.8cm tall HomePod is pitched as a music-first wireless speaker that can be controlled by voice using Apple’s Siri assistant, which can also set timers, reminders, check the weather and control smart home devices. Continue reading...
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How to drink from a water fountain – without catching something (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
As part of a push to reduce plastic waste, London’s mayor has announced that drinking fountains are to return. But is it as safe as water at home? And how do you avoid getting oral herpes? Wonderful news! Water fountains are coming back. In an attempt to tackle plastic waste, the old municipal staple will be installed in public places in London so we can have a free drink and top up refillable bottles. But can we be sure the water is clean? If your lips touch the spout, will you get herpes or some other orally transmissible infection? Should you wipe the spout before drinking? Or perhaps do a sneaky inspection of the person in front of you to establish if their oral hygiene is up to scratch? Water fountains have been a feature of cities since the ancient Greeks put them near temples and dedicated them to gods and heroes. Britain caught up in the mid-19th century, with the Metropolitan Free Drinking Fountain Association responsible for 800 drinking fountains in London alone. The technology used to help reduce the risk of infectious diseases has improved, including slanted jets of water, filters and better maintenance. But over the past 30 to 40 years, drinking fountains have been disappearing because of the marketing of bottled water, a lack of investment and maintenance by local authorities, and concern about health risks. So, how best to ensure a hygienic experience? Continue reading...
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Labour intervenes in council housing plan dispute (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
National executive committee asks Haringey to rethink scheme Labour has taken the unprecedented decision to ask one of its London councils to rethink its controversial plans for a public-private housing scheme. The national executive committee (NEC) voted unanimously to call on Haringey council, led by Labour’s Claire Kober, to reconsider the plans to go into partnership with developer Lendlease to build 6,400 new homes in the borough. Continue reading...
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Police investigate new allegation against John Worboys (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Met investigating allegation made this month of a sexual assault 20 years ago The police are investigating a new complaint of sexual assault against John Worboys, the black-cab rapist, it has been confirmed, as prison authorities moved him to a London jail ahead of his scheduled release. The impact on Worboys’ potential release is unknown but the move will give fresh hope to his victims that his release may be halted if he is arrested or charged in connection with a further offence. Continue reading...
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Ban credit cards for online gambling, says government review (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Levy on firms for addiction treatment among gambling regulation advice A ban on using credit cards for online gambling and a mandatory levy on gambling firms to fund addiction treatment are among last-minute recommendations submitted as part of a government review of gambling regulation. As a consultation by the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) drew to a close, ministers faced calls to introduce concrete measures to tackle the “hidden addiction” suffered by the UK’s estimated 430,000 problem gamblers. Continue reading...
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Windsor councillors leave Tory group over homelessness row (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Two quit in protest after Conservative leader Simon Dudley survives confidence vote Two councillors from the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead have quit the local authority’s Conservative party group in protest after the council leader demanded the area to be cleared of homeless people before the royal wedding in May. Simon Dudley, the council’s Conservative leader, was widely criticised for asking to Thames Valley police to take action against “aggressive begging and intimidation” and “bags and detritus” in the street. Continue reading...
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Number of Britons living with chronic illnesses set to rise (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Life expectancy set to increase but sedentary lifestyles will lead to more chronic illnesses, says report More than 2 million Britons will be living with four or more chronic illnesses within 20 years due to time spent living a sedentary lifestyle, new research has found. Although life expectancy is set to increase by 3.6 years for men and 2.9 years for women, two-thirds of this extra time is likely to be marred by disease. Continue reading...
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Offender tagging scheme is 'catastrophic waste of public money' (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
MPs’ report says GPS tags scheme is over budget and uses technology from 2011 The Ministry of Justice’s programme to introduce the next generation of satellite tracking tags for offenders has been “fundamentally flawed” and proved “a catastrophic waste of public money”, MPs have concluded. The long-promised programme to introduce the GPS tags is already five years behind schedule and more than £60m over its £130m original budget. Continue reading...
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Carlisle Lake District airport to open for passenger flights in June (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Flights from the south of England, Belfast and Dublin to the small regional airport are set to boost tourism to Cumbria Commercial passenger flights will be coming to Cumbria from June from airports including Southend, Dublin and Belfast, though the carriers have not yet been confirmed. It will be the first time Carlisle Lake District airport has been used for commercial flights since 1993. Currently the airport is mostly used for flight training and local sightseeing trips. Previous attempts to establish passenger flights from the airport have been largely unsuccessful. In the 1940s, 60s, 80s and 90s connections were launched to destinations such as Belfast and London but all were shortlived. Continue reading...
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National Trust to create UK sanctuary for endangered butterfly (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Heddon Valley in Devon to be haven for high brown fritillary, supported by lottery funding A beautiful wooded valley on the Devon coast is to be the focus of a project to save the UK’s most endangered butterfly – the high brown fritillary. Conservationists believe changes to woodland management, such as the abandonment of coppicing, and climate change have contributed to the steep decline of the large, powerful, fast-flying butterfly over the last 50 years. Continue reading...
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Key Republican-Democratic battles unresolved despite shutdown deal (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Lawmakers in the two parties are no closer to resolving the issues that triggered the shutdown, such as budget and immigration Three days after debate over federal spending and immigration policy shut down the federal government, key battles between Democrats and Republicans remained unresolved on Tuesday. Related: Key players in the US government shutdown: who came out on top? Continue reading...
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Justin Trudeau tells Davos: tackle inequality or risk failure (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Canadian prime minister says employing more women is the smart thing to do Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, has challenged leaders of the world’s biggest corporations to hire more women and to tackle sexual harassment as he warned that a business-as-usual approach to tackling inequality would lead to failure for everyone. In a keynote speech to the World Economic Forum in Davos, Trudeau said hiring, promoting and retaining more women was the key to narrowing the “staggering” gap between rich and poor. Continue reading...
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US-led coalition strikes kill 150 Islamic State militants in Syria (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Strikes near As Shafah come as the US urged Turkey to focus on fighting Isis and show restraint in its campaign against Kurdish forces The US-led coalition fighting Islamic State has said it has killed nearly 150 militants in strikesin the Syrian middle Euphrates valley.
The strikes on Saturday come as the US urged Turkey to show restraint in its campaign against Kurdish forces in northern Syria and to focus on fighting Isis. On Tuesday, Turkey claimed to have killed 260 Kurdish and Isis fighters in a four-day offensive the north of the country. Continue reading...
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Maduro eyes re-election as Venezuela fires starting gun for presidential vote (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Constituent assembly calls for election in first four months of 2018 Ruling Socialists seek to exploit opposition disarray Venezuela’s President Nicolás Maduro has said that he is ready to seek another term in office after the pro-government constituent assembly declared that new presidential elections must be held by 30 April. Analysts described Tuesday’s announcement as an attempt by the ruling socialist party to exploit opposition disarray – and cement control before the country’s economic crisis becomes even more acute. Continue reading...
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Sweden calls on China to release detained bookseller Gui Minhai (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Sweden’s foreign minister says her country takes “a very serious view” of Gui’s detention as he travelled to Beijing for a medical examination Sweden has called on China to immediately free missing bookseller Gui Minhai who was seized by Chinese agents on Saturday as he travelled to Beijing with two European diplomats. In a statement, Sweden’s foreign minister, Margot Wallström, said: “We expect the immediate release of our fellow citizen, and that he be given the opportunity to meet Swedish diplomatic and medical staff.” Continue reading...
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Chile president-elect reveals hardline cabinet with ties to Pinochet (mer., 24 janv. 2018)
Conservatives to join Sebastian Piñera, who campaigned as centrist New interior minister was vocal supporter of Pinochet’s dictatorship Chile’s president-elect, the billionaire businessman Sebastian Piñera, has unveiled a new hardline cabinet, including prominent conservative figures and some politicians once closely aligned with the Pinochet dictatorship. The new interior minister, Andrés Chadwick, was a vocal supporter of Augusto Pinochet during his 1973-1990 regime, which named him president of the Catholic University Students Federation. Continue reading...
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Tax slips don't lie? Shakira under investigation for tax evasion (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The Colombian singer, who switched residences in 2015 from the Bahamas to Barcelona, allegedly failed to pay income taxes in Spain Judicial authorities in Spain say Shakira is under investigation for possible tax evasion during the three years before she officially moved to Barcelona.
The Colombian singer switched residences in 2015 from the Bahamas to Barcelona, where she lives with her partner, Barça soccer player Gerard Piqué, and the couple’s two sons. Continue reading...
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CIA chief draws new 'red line' on North Korea nuclear buildup (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Mike Pompeo hints that the ability to fire multiple ICBMs at continental US would be Trump’s threshold for military action The CIA director, Mike Pompeo, has said that the Trump administration is intent on preventing North Korea from being able to fire multiple nuclear missiles at the United States, apparently sketching out a new red line for the regime in Pyongyang. Speaking in Washington, Pompeo explained for the first time what the administration meant when it warns that it would not allow the regime of Kim Jong-un to threaten the US with a nuclear weapon. Continue reading...
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‘Never get high on your own supply’ – why social media bosses don’t use social media (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Developers of platforms such as Facebook have admitted that they were designed to be addictive. Should we be following the executives’ example and going cold turkey – and is it even possible for mere mortals? Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t use Facebook like you or me. The 33-year-old chief executive has a team of 12 moderators dedicated to deleting comments and spam from his page, according to Bloomberg. He has a “handful” of employees who help him write his posts and speeches and a number of professional photographers who take perfectly stage-managed pictures of him meeting veterans in Kentucky, small-business owners in Missouri or cheesesteak vendors in Philadelphia. Facebook’s locked-down nature means mere mortals can’t see the private posts on Zuckerberg’s timeline, but it is hard to imagine him getting into arguments about a racist relative’s post of an anti-immigration meme. And it is not just Zuckerberg. None of the company’s key executives has a “normal” Facebook presence. You can’t add them as friends, they rarely post publicly and they keep private some information that the platform suggests be made public by default, such as the number of friends they have. Continue reading...
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Mary Lee Berners-Lee obituary (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Computer scientist who became one of the world’s first freelance programmers in the 1950s The computer scientist Mary Lee Berners-Lee, who has died aged 93, was on the programming team for the computer that in 1951 became the first in the world to be sold commercially: the Ferranti Mark I. She led a successful campaign at Ferranti for equal pay for male and female programmers, almost two decades before the Equal Pay Act came into force. As a young mother in the mid-1950s she set up on her own as a home-based software consultant, making her one of the world’s first freelance programmers. Modest about her own pioneering achievements, she is on record (in an interview with computer historian Janet Abbate) as saying that her biggest contribution was to be “the grandmother of the web”. In 1989 Tim Berners-Lee (now Sir Tim), the eldest of her four children, proposed a system to access and exchange documents across the internet, and soon afterwards built the first web server, website and browser. Continue reading...
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Andrea Albutt: ‘Carillion has left our prisons in a terrible state’ | Erwin James (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
We desperately need to take back control of prison buildings to halt the chronic decline in our jails, says prison governors chief Andrea Albutt, the president of the Prison Governors Association, is angry. The former army nurse, who joined the prison service as a young hospital officer in 1990, announced last week that despair was “running through the veins” of her organisation. With the highest rates of self-harm, suicide, drug use and violence ever seen and the recent scathing prison inspection reports on HMPs Liverpool and Nottingham, the prison system has arguably reached the lowest point in its history. Related: Violence and self-harm in UK prisons continue to surge Continue reading...
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How a new technology is changing the lives of people who cannot speak (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Millions are robbed of the power of speech by illness, injury or lifelong conditions. Can the creation of bespoke digital voices transform their ability to communicate? By Jordan Kisner Last November, Joe Morris, a 31-year-old film-maker from London, noticed a sore spot on his tongue. He figured he’d bitten himself in his sleep and thought nothing more about it until halfway through the winter holidays, when he realised the sore was still with him. He Googled “cut on tongue won’t heal” and, after sifting through pages of medical information on oral cancer, he decided to call his doctor. The cut was nothing, Joe was sure: he was a non-smoker with no family history of cancer. But he’d make an appointment, just in case. Continue reading...
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‘​I’d have gone back to him’: why women’s refuges can’t afford more cuts (lun., 22 janv. 2018)
The stories of abuse survivors offer a window on to the crisis in the women’s sector. So why is the government considering funding changes that are a matter of life and death? Fifteen years ago, when Lynn fled her abusive partner with her six-month-old baby, she was housed in a homeless shelter because there was no space at a women’s refuge. When she arrived, staff asked her where her possessions were, allotted her a single knife, fork and spoon and begrudgingly dragged a dirty cot out of the garage. The cot was crawling with spiders and riddled with their eggs. Crying, Lynn taped bin bags over the infested mattress to lay her child down. But she was lucky. Ten days later, a space at a women’s refuge became available. The first question she asked on arrival was: “I don’t suppose you’ve got any sanitary towels?” Continue reading...
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Khanyi's matric dance: a South African student's rite of passage – photo essay (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The final year of high school in South Africa is known as matric, and the ball held to mark it is a major event in students’ lives. Many spend a lot of time and money meticulously planning their outfits, getting dresses and suits custom-made. Photographer Alice Mann follows Khanyisa Mtulu as she prepares for her dance Khanyi is from Phillipi, one of the most dangerous townships in Cape Town. It is an area that has one of the highest murder rates in the country, and where gang violence and drug abuse are rampant. Many families in the area face acute poverty and social challenges; dropping out of school is common. Pupils at Peak View high school, where Khanyi studies, often repeat grades in order to get to the final year of school, which is seen a success in itself, whether or not a student passes their final exams. Continue reading...
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London's 65th annual toy fair – in pictures (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
London’s Olympia hosts the annual fair, which is organised by the British Toy and Hobby Association and showcases more than 260 brands and products from UK and international manufacturers Continue reading...
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Volcanic eruptions and Stalin in Berlin: Tuesday's best photos (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including the Dior Ball and a royal exhibition Continue reading...
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Message from the Skies: Val McDermid's projected story – in pictures (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
Edinburgh’s Hogmanay and International Book Festival commissioned Val McDermid to write a short story, New Year’s Resurrection, which is told through projections on to buildings and landmarks around the city. Visitors can use an app for iOS and Android to navigate the nighttime locations Message from the Skies: New Year’s Resurrection runs until Burns Night, 25 January Continue reading...
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Breathtaking Visions of Earth: Outdoor Photographer of the Year (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
The Outdoor Photographer of the Year competition has announced its category winners. The competition, now in its seventh year, celebrates the work of image makers and offers an insight into the landscapes, wildlife and nature of the planet and the adventures to be found on it The overall winner and runner-up will be announced at the Photography Show in Birmingham on 17 March Continue reading...
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Hugh Masekela: life and career of the jazz trumpeter – in pictures (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
A look at the life of the legendary South African trumpeter, who has died aged 78 Interview from the archive: ‘When I look at the time left I have to hurry up’ Continue reading...
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The vinyl countdown: how artists remade the record sleeve – in pictures (mar., 23 janv. 2018)
From Picasso to Andy Warhol, visual artists have long been lured by the magic of music. A new exhibition reveals the art world’s most striking album covers Continue reading...
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