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The Guardian

Sleaford byelection: Caroline Johnson holds seat for Conservatives (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Local doctor wins ahead of Ukip candidate Victoria Ayling in poll triggered by resignation of Tories’ Stephen Phillips The Conservatives have held the seat of Sleaford and North Hykeham in Lincolnshire in a byelection triggered by the resignation of Stephen Phillips over “irreconcilable policy differences” with Theresa May. Caroline Johnson, a children’s doctor and local Conservative, won the seat with a large majority of 17,570 votes. Her Ukip rival, Victoria Ayling, came second with 4,426. Continue reading...
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John Glenn, first US astronaut to orbit Earth, dies aged 95 (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Glenn served 24 years as a US senator from Ohio and later became the oldest person to be sent into space Obituary: John Glenn – astronaut, senator, aviation pioneer John Glenn, a former astronaut and US senator for almost quarter of a century, has died in Ohio aged 95. Glenn died on Thursday afternoon at the James cancer hospital in Columbus, according to Hank Wilson of the John Glenn School of Public Affairs. Ohio governor John Kasich also confirmed the news on Twitter. Continue reading...
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Hillary Clinton warns fake news can have 'real world consequences' (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
In rare public appearance since losing the election, Clinton alluded to ‘Pizzagate’ conspiracy in which a man opened fire after reading a false news story Hillary Clinton issued a call to action against the “epidemic” of fake news in a rare public appearance since her unexpected loss to Donald Trump. The Democratic presidential nominee warned that the proliferation of false news stories online can have “real world consequences”, alluding to an incident over the weekend in which a man opened fire at Comet Ping Pong after reading a false news story that purported the DC pizzeria was harboring children as part of a sex ring led by Clinton. No one was injured. Continue reading...
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Jennifer Lawrence offends with story about 'butt-scratching' on sacred rocks (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Actor’s story about actions while filming Hunger Games movie in Hawaii criticised as ‘disrespectful and inconsiderate’ Jennifer Lawrence has drawn scathing criticism for an anecdote she told on the BBC, about disrespecting local customs while shooting in Hawaii. In a recent interview, Lawrence told a story about “butt-scratchin’” on rocks that are considered sacred to native Hawaiians, while shooting The Hunger Games: Catching Fire in 2012. Continue reading...
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India cash crisis: 100,000 villages promised electronic payment machines (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Every village will get two point-of-sale machines, promises finance minister in bid to ease anger at sudden removal of 500- and 1,000-rupee notes Tens of thousands of Indian villages will soon be equipped with card-swiping machines to boost cashless payments, the finance minister promised on Thursday, a month after the government banned high-value banknotes. Prime Minister Narendra Modi sparked chaos with his shock announcement last month that all 500- and 1,000-rupee notes – which make up 85% of bills in circulation – would cease to be legal tender. Continue reading...
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UK food prices will rise without EU workers, say trade groups (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Food and drink industry flags up labour shortages as EU workers leave after Brexit vote or stay away due to fall in pound Food prices will rise unless the government ensures EU citizens can work in the UK after Brexit, according to industry groups representing the major supermarkets and food manufacturers, including the owner of Marmite. Related: EU workers in food and drink industry need assurance over Brexit | Letters Continue reading...
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MP Michelle Thomson says she was raped aged 14 (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Politician moves colleagues to tears as she describes her experience during Commons debate on violence against women A Scottish MP has told a House of Commons debate on violence against women that she was raped at the age of 14, moving colleagues to tears and declaring: “I’m not a victim. I’m a survivor.” Michelle Thomson, who was elected as an SNP member but withdrew from the party whip last year, told parliament: “When I was 14, I was raped. Continue reading...
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Justin Trudeau under pressure amid cash-for-access fundraising claims (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Dream run ends for Canada’s governing Liberal party after reports that rich donors got privileged access to prime minister and cabinet members at events Canada’s prime minister, Justin Trudeau, has become embroiled in allegations of holding cash-for-access political fundraisers in developments that could tarnish his image as a youthful reformer. Trudeau was pressed hard by opposition leaders on Thursday about newspaper reports that select donors to the ruling Liberal party enjoyed privileged access to fundraising events where the prime minister and cabinet members spoke. Continue reading...
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'Warning shots' should be fired to deter EU-bound migrants, says Danish MP (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
EU affairs spokesman for Denmark’s second-largest party apologises for saying they should be fired at, and suggests a warning shot instead A Danish lawmaker has said he regretted saying migrants sailing to Europe should “be fired at” if they crossed the continent’s “territorial waters”. He clarified his remarks to say “warning shots” should be fired instead. Kenneth Kristensen Berth is a member of the anti-immigration and populist Danish People’s party, the country’s second-largest party and a government ally. Continue reading...
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Courtside summit: David Cameron and George W Bush watch college basketball (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The former British prime minister tweeted that sport’s rules ‘baffled’ him when he accompanied the Bushes to SMU v TCU game in Dallas As the government he once led continues to wrestle with the consequences of the Brexit referendum he called, David Cameron popped up in Dallas on Wednesday night to grapple with a very different set of rules and regulations. The former UK prime minister joined George W Bush to watch the Southern Methodist University Mustangs beat the Texas Christian University Horned Frogs, 74-59. Continue reading...
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Pike river mine disaster: families fight to stop their dead being sealed away forever (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Relatives of some of the 29 men who died in the New Zealand pit are guarding its entrance to prevent the mine’s owner blocking it with concrete It has just gone six in the morning when Bernie Monk emerges through the cloying mist of Grey valley and is handed a mug of steaming coffee. The eyes of two dozen protesters turn to the burly publican as he swats sandflies from his face and begins to speak. “I’ve got a good plan,” he tells the group gathered in a semi-circle, wrapped up in beanies and khaki oilskins against a southerly battering New Zealand’s west coast. “A plan that will stop any bastards getting up there again.” Continue reading...
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Time to think the unthinkable about President Le Pen | Timothy Garton Ash (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Logic is against Marine Le Pen, as it was with Trump and Brexit. No wonder people are weighing up the possible repercussions Could President Marine Le Pen trigger article 50 without a parliamentary vote? Article 50 of the Lisbon treaty, that is, to take France out of the European Union, following Britain. Such is the question I find myself discussing in Paris with leading French experts. Provisional conclusion: since France, unlike Britain, is a presidential democracy, she could probably do it herself initially, but it would then require parliament to vote a revision of the French constitution. The mere fact that my French friends raise the question, even very hypothetically and three-quarters-jokingly, is a sign of the times. What was it Rousseau said? “To be sane in a world of madmen is in itself a kind of madness.” Related: François Fillon is as big a threat to liberal values as Marine Le Pen | Natalie Nougayrède Continue reading...
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Harry Arter: ‘Some days I feel like a normal person. But then it will just hit you’ (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Saturday marks a year since Bournemouth’s midfielder and his fiancée Rachel lost their daughter. He reflects on 12 months of pain, anger, envy and finally happiness – at thoughts of a child gone too soon and another due in February A few weeks had passed when Harry Arter summoned the strength to look inside the memory box that would unlock so many emotions. Rachel, his fiancée, had been gently encouraging him to do so for a while, yet Arter was mentally unable to take that step as he wrestled with the devastating loss of the stillborn daughter he had never set eyes on. Now, in a quiet moment at home, he felt ready. “I looked in the box without Rachel knowing because I wanted to look on my own,” Arter says. “I remember I was sobbing – it was the strangest feeling that I’ve ever had in my life, looking at a picture of a little baby that I’ve never seen but loving her so much at the same time. I just saw a beautiful little girl, who I felt so proud of straight away.” Continue reading...
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I, Daniel Blake sweeps Evening Standard film awards (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Ken Loach’s drama wins best British film, best actress and most powerful scene, while Hugh Grant and Kate Beckinsale take acting honours I, Daniel Blake, Ken Loach’s drama about a middle-aged carpenter recovering from a heart attack and trying to navigate the benefits system, has taken best British film at the Evening Standard film awards. At a ceremony in London hosted by the actor and director Richard Ayoade, the drama also picked up best actress for newcomer Hayley Squires, who plays a single mother also encountering obstacles claiming welfare. It capped the evening by winning the award for most powerful scene, for its harrowing sequence set in a foodbank in which Squires’s character is so hungry she eats from a tin of cold baked beans. Continue reading...
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Drunk history: the weirdest artifacts from New York's wild past (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
A repository in Manhattan houses over one million archaeological items found in the city from saucepan-sized oysters to a cow bone douche If you can say one thing about New York public officials in the early 1800s, it’s that they knew how to party. The extent of their raucous boozing and debauchery is being carefully catalogued inside the newly opened Nan A Rothschild Research Center, a repository in midtown Manhattan housing over one million archaeological artifacts from New York City’s past. On a recent Thursday morning, Amanda Sutphin, the director of archaeology for the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission, sorted through some of her favorite City Hall party relics. She picked up a smooth, cylindrical object the size of stubby Cuban cigar. “Take a look at this douche,” said Sutphin, who is tall, with glasses and a short brown bob. “It’s made of cow bone though, so it might have felt a bit rough.” Continue reading...
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India v England: fourth Test, day two – live! (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Over-by-over updates as England resume on 288-5 in Mumbai Who is Keaton Jennings, England’s latest debut centurion? Email simon.burnton@theguardian.com or tweet @SimonBurnton 3.45am GMT Hello world! Well there’s a time and a place for a brilliantly crafted preamble, but 3.30am isn’t it. And Sky are showing an interview with Kelly Holmes that’s really quite moving. Still, the cricket should be worth being conscious for, delicately poised as it is. England, with a current tally of 288, are about 120 runs away from happiness; India, having lost the toss but taken five wickets, are a good first hour away from being pretty pleased with themselves. Anyway, and most importantly, hello! 2.44pm GMT Simon will be here shortly. Here’s Vic Marks’ report from day one: Alastair Cook has spent four years waiting for a decent opening partner and then all of a sudden two of them come along in the space of three weeks. Keaton Jennings is the latest, welcome arrival. Under a cloudless sky he became the first England player since Billy Griffith in 1948 in Trinidad to score a century on his first day as a Test cricketer – and we can be fairly confident that Griffith did not reach those coveted three figures with a reverse sweep. In the short term Jennings’s admirable 112 was the foundation of England’s 288 for five, a fair total on the first day of a Mumbai Test but by no means an impregnable one. As ever on this excellent surface there are runs to be scored early in the match. The ball bounces more here in a manner that encourages strokemakers; it also turns increasingly and the edges are more likely to carry. Mumbai is a long way from Chester-le-Street in very many ways but Jennings found a method to prosper in alien conditions. Continue reading...
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Manchester United defeat Zorya Luhansk to advance in Europa League (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Zorya Luhansk 0-2 Manchester United Manchester United are through to the Europa League knockout stage courtesy of Henrikh Mkhitaryan’s fine first goal for the club and Zlatan Ibrahimovic’s late finish. José Mourinho’s team finished second in their group, however, so will be unseeded in Monday’s draw for the round of 32. A first away win in the competition was marred by an outbreak of violence during the interval, moreover, and there was disappointment for Wayne Rooney, who remains stuck on 248 goals and still in need of two more to become the club’s all-time record scorer. Continue reading...
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Wasteful Southampton crash out of Europa League to Israeli champions (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Southampton’s European adventure came to an abrupt end on Thursday night at the hands of Hapoel Be’er Sheva, the Israeli champions, who dumped Claude Puel’s side out of the Europa League group stages to reach the round of 32 at their expense. Southampton were tepid throughout, edging towards a goalless draw that would have seen them through until, with the visitors’ first shot of the evening on target, Maor Buzaglo drilled an effort low beyond the goalkeeper, Fraser Forster, after 78 minutes. Continue reading...
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Anthony Joshua shuns table-throwing but admits ‘this is fighting not tennis’ (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• IBF heavyweight champion eschews shenanigans with Eric Molina • Joshua: ‘When it happens, it seems it’s what some people want to see’ Don King was not in the room on Thursday, but his travelling surrogates did their raucous best to provoke Anthony Joshua into the sort of response that had illuminated the previous day’s press conference, starring the subsequently punished Dereck “Table-thrower” Chisora and Dillian “Sit-tight” Whyte. Joshua, the IBF heavyweight champion, ignored the taunts of the American promoter’s hired help and smiled serenely within jabbing distance of his latest challenger, the equally polite Texan Eric Molina, who has entrusted his career to the excitable King, who may yet blow into town to stir a few winter leaves. Continue reading...
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Stuart Lancaster ‘not surprised’ at England’s success under Eddie Jones (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Former head coach says Jones deserves the credit for England’s ‘fantastic’ run • Back at Northampton with new club Leinster in European Champions Cup Stuart Lancaster returns on Friday night to an English club ground in an official capacity for the first time since England were knocked out of last year’s World Cup and he lost his job as head coach in what was euphemistically described at the time as a mutual decision. Now a senior coach with Leinster after taking time out in the new year to study coaching methods in the southern hemisphere, Lancaster will be at Franklin’s Gardens for the European Champions Cup match with Northampton and a reunion with a player he controversially left out of his World Cup squad on disciplinary grounds, England’s current captain, Dylan Hartley, who will be on the bench after his autumn series exertions. Continue reading...
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British Cycling must come clean over Shane Sutton and Jess Varnish (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Governing body’s latest mishap is yet another example of its lack of openness and transparency For all its successes on the track in 2016, British Cycling continues to lurch unsteadily through a series of public-relations mishaps off it – many of them of its own making. Yet even by its standards, contriving to upset Jess Varnish and Shane Sutton in an internal review designed to find the inner truth of their dispute – while also generating more fears about its lack of openness – is not a good look. Continue reading...
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Sepp Blatter: Gianni Infantino has shown me no respect (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
• Disgraced former Fifa president turns on his successor • 80-year-old says Infantino has not returned his calls Sepp Blatter says his successor Gianni Infantino has shown him no respect by failing to return his phone calls. The disgraced former Fifa president lost his Court of Arbitration for Sport (Cas) appeal on Monday against a six-year ban for ethics violations, imposed amid the biggest corruption scandal to hit world football’s governing body. Continue reading...
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Russian boxer and Romanian weightlifter stripped of Rio 2016 medals (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Olympic flyweight silver medallist Aloian taken to task for stimulant • Romania’s Gabriel Sincraian tested positive for exogenous testosterone The Russian boxer Misha Aloian and Romanian weightlifter Gabriel Sincraian have been stripped of their 2016 Olympic medals after failing doping tests at the Games, the Court of Arbitration for Sport said on Thursday. Related: Wada intent on proving systemic doping is not limited to Russia Continue reading...
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Leeds United’s owner Massimo Cellino banned for 18 months by FA (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Cellino banned for breaking the Football Association’s agent regulations • Suspension covers being a director or shadow director of any club Massimo Cellino, the owner of Leeds United, is contemplating an 18-month suspension from all football-related activities after the Football Association revealed that a disciplinary panel convened in September had found him guilty of breaching agent regulations. The delay in announcing a sanction scheduled to take effect from 1 February was prompted by concerns that publicising Cellino’s punishment for his role in Ross McCormack’s transfer from Leeds to Fulham in 2014 for around £11m might prejudice the appeal the 60-year-old Italian is currently preparing. Continue reading...
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Gary Johnson demands compensation from Chelsea over sexual abuse claims (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Johnson paid £50,000 by Chelsea not to make allegations public • ‘It’s not enough for the pain and suffering I’ve had’ says 57-year-old Gary Johnson, the former player who was paid £50,000 by Chelsea not to go public with allegations that he was sexually abused by their former chief scout Eddie Heath, has demanded further financial compensation from the club. Johnson was a member of Chelsea’s first team from 1978 to 1981 after joining the club as an 11-year-old in 1970. The 57-year-old spoke out recently to say he was groomed from the age of 13 by Heath, who was the Chelsea’s chief scout from 1968 to 1979 and has subsequently died. Continue reading...
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Wada intent on proving systemic doping is not limited to Russia (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Chief investigator Gunter Younger has to ‘pick battles’ due to backlog of cases • Wada hamstrung by lack of resources in fight against drugs in sport The World Anti-Doping Agency’s chief investigator has set his sights on exposing systemic doping in countries other than Russia but admits a lack of resources means he already has a backlog of cases only two months into his new job. Gunter Younger, who worked with Dick Pound and Prof Richard McLaren on last year’s independent commission report that exposed the staggering scale of Russia’s doping before he joined Wada full-time in October, told the Guardian he planned to run more big cases in future but was already having to pick his battles. Continue reading...
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Has Australia fallen out of love with rugby union? (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Australia were well beaten by England on Saturday but the sport is facing bigger troubles at home, where participation, investment and interest are falling By Jonathan Drennan for Behind the Lines, part of the Guardian Sport Network The Wallabies have returned home after a heavy defeat to England in front of a capacity crowd at Twickenham. Taking a beating from England is never easy for any Australian sports fan, but the result was softened by the fact that the match reports hovered slightly above the weekend’s lawn bowl results. Rugby union is largely out of sight and out of mind here. If you don’t live in Australia, it is hard to believe that rugby union features so low on the sporting agenda. The Wallaby jersey has been worn by some of the game’s greatest players and the country’s contribution to the sport has been enormous historically, but the game is losing relevance for Australians. The country’s stadiums are barely filled and the crowds are muted. Continue reading...
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Northampton ready for ruling on George North concussion controversy (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Saints to discover on Friday whether further action will be taken • Charge of bringing the game into disrepute, and a fine, could result Northampton are set to discover whether they will face further action over the George North concussion saga. A meeting will be held on Friday between club officials and an independent medical expert as the investigation continues into how North was allowed to return to the field following a heavy knock in last Saturday’s Premiership game at Leicester. Saints have declined to make any further comment since issuing a statement claiming their medical staff were unaware North had lost consciousness because the correct footage was not available on their monitors. This stance has been questioned by the host broadcaster, BT Sport, which has also pointed out the relevant images were repeatedly shown on other screens at Franklin’s Gardens. Continue reading...
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Boxing brawls, junior Joe Cole, plus Bob Paisley – This is Your Life (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
This week’s roundup also features a penalty flag dance, a goal-line clearance and when team-mates attack 1) Only recently unearthed on VHS and uploaded, here’s former Liverpool manager Bob Paisley being This-Is-Your-Lifed by Eamonn Andrews in 1977 – featuring guest appearances from Matt Busby, Bill Shankly and Kevin Keegan via satellite. Among other sport stars to get the red book treatment: Bobby Charlton is set up by Busby and Jimmy Hill, and Muhammad Ali’s mum leaves the Greatest speechless. George Best is surprised by his entire extended family, Barry McGuigan gets emotional and the Matchroom mob join Ronnie Wood and Bobby Davro to pay homage to Jimmy White. Then there’s Damon Hill, Ian Wright and, er, Kriss Akabusi, while John Motson’s big final guest is … Ronnie Radford. Continue reading...
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Arsène Wenger warns no player is bigger than the club (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Alexis Sánchez and Mesut Özil in talks over new deals at Emirates • Sánchez linked to £400,000-a-week move to China Arsène Wenger has warned that “every club loses big players” and no individual is bigger than Arsenal as he tries to keep several of his most important squad members. Alexis Sánchez and Mesut Özil are involved in protracted negotiations over extending their deals, which expire in the summer of 2018. Reports this week suggested there was an offer from the Chinese Super League that could pay Sánchez £400,000 a week and Özil has been linked with a return to Real Madrid. Arsenal have sold players before as their contracts wound down, including Cesc Fàbregas and Robin van Persie, but Wenger believes the current situation is different and factors other than money will decide the outcome. Continue reading...
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Mood swing helps Tony Pulis’s West Brom discover their inner buccaneer | Paul Doyle (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Encouraging signs in their past four games indicate there is sustainable change afoot at The Hawthorns with a trip to Premier League leaders Chelsea next up When Tony Pulis signed a one-year contract extension at West Bromwich Albion in October, he spoke of how he intended to move the club forward but warned against the scourge he has devoted his career to trying to eradicate: wishful thinking. “There’s a star in the sky and everyone is pointing at that star,” he tut-tutted. “They’re not looking at other things left, right and centre.” Pulis is not a manager who spends time gazing at stars but that is not to say he eschews high aims. And look, West Bromwich are suddenly seventh in the Premier League, having been one place above the relegation zone a month ago. As things stand, Pulis is on course to achieve his target of a top-half finish, which, admirable as his record is, would be a first for him in a career spanning nearly three decades. The West Brom winger James McClean suggested this week that with a bit of luck, European qualification could be within reach. Continue reading...
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Yannick Bolasie injury may be worse than stated, admits Everton’s Koeman (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Fears that winger could be out for longer than nine months • Koeman says club may look to sign a player for Bolasie’s position Everton will send Yannick Bolasie for further tests on his injured knee amid fears their £25m summer signing has damaged more than his cruciate ligament and faces a longer recovery period as a consequence. The former Crystal Palace winger will miss the remainder of his debut season at Goodison Park after injuring his anterior cruciate ligament during Sunday’s 1-1 draw against Manchester United. Bolasie would be facing up to nine months out for an ACL rupture. Continue reading...
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Metropolitan police to investigate sexual abuse claims at London clubs (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
• Team of specialist officers to look into ‘non-recent’ crimes • Met become 22nd force to investigate claims of sexual abuse in football The Metropolitan police has launched an investigation into historical sexual abuse claims involving London football clubs, becoming the 21st force across the country to have begun similar inquiries into teams in their areas. Britain’s largest police force said specialist officers would look into allegations of “non-recent” crimes, but refused to say which clubs it was investigating. Continue reading...
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Giants' Nikita Whitlock says home hit with 'KKK' and 'Go back to Africa' graffiti (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Full-back says he was victim of burglary for second time in a month ‘It’s very disgusting, actually. It’s very disheartening’ New York Giants full-back Nikita Whitlock said that burglars left disturbing racist graffiti during a break-in at his New Jersey apartment on Tuesday night. Whitlock said the burglars took jewelry and also scrawled a swastika, “KKK” and “Go back to Africa” during the incident. “It’s about to be 2017,” Whitlock, who is from Texas, told New York’s WCBS-TV. “Oppression, violence, racism, hatred, violence, there’s no need for that.” Pictures from the apartment shown by WCBS-TV also appeared to show “Trump” written among the graffiti. Continue reading...
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Steve Bell on Boris Johnson's remarks on Saudi Arabia – cartoon (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
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For political women it’s Jackie Kennedy or bust | Jess Cartner-Morley (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
No one criticises male politicians for their clothes, so why do the likes of Melania Trump and Theresa May come in for such flak over their fashion choices? Should the hypothesised invitation to Buckingham Palace arrive, Melania Trump will not be able to do as Michelle Obama did and have Tom Ford run up a gown for the occasion. Neither will Marc Jacobs, Phillip Lim or Sophie Theallet – labels of choice for the current first lady – be taking her calls. All of these designers have taken a stand against the incoming administration by making it clear that, as of the inauguration in January, dressing the first lady will cease to be an honour they choose to accept. This makes no material difference whatsoever. Melania Trump will continue to wear designer clothes of her choice, simply by paying for them. She bought both the white Roksanda “Margot” dress she wore for her Republican convention speech and the Balmain camel coat in which she cast her vote on Net-A-Porter, paying around £1,000 and £2,500 respectively. Fashion industry website Women’s Wear Daily reported that the Ralph Lauren jumpsuit she wore for her husband’s victory speech, which retails for around £3,000, was purchased at full price at Lauren’s Madison Avenue boutique. Continue reading...
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Court in an existential nightmare over Brexit | John Crace (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
From the Dangerous Dogs Act to the Loch Ness monster, it was all crammed into day four of the supreme court hearing Four days is just a blink of an eye for lawyers used to charging by the minute. Left to their own devices, everyone at the supreme court would have been much happier dragging things out for a couple of years – finally reaching a decision on whether the government had the constitutional right to trigger Brexit long after Britain had left the EU. But needs must and there was a noticeable sense of disquiet – not to mention haste – as the proceedings entered their final day. After some discussion about the semantic differences between “with regard to” and “relating to” and the epistemology of “imposing a clamp on a conduit pipe”, Richard Gordon, the barrister representing the Welsh assembly, declared that the whole case wasn’t nearly as complicated as everyone had been making out. Continue reading...
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Assimilation threatens the existence of other cultures | Giles Fraser | Loose canon (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The very nature of community is that there is a boundary between those who are in it and those who are not This week a doctor from north London was telling me about one of his patients, a lad of 20 who has lived in the borough of Hackney all his life. He was born here and grew up here. And he’s a bright boy – yet he speaks only a few very rudimentary words of English. The language he speaks at home and at school is Yiddish. Some may be appalled by the insularity of the community in which this young man was raised. But I admire it. In particular, I admire the resilience of a community that seeks to maintain its distinctiveness and recognises, quite rightly, that assimilation into the broader culture would mean the gradual dilution, and the eventual extinction, of its own way of life. It is no surprise to me that the ultra orthodox are thriving, with high birth rates and predictions that they will be constitute a majority of the Jewish population within 20 years. They have refused assimilation. It adds immeasurably to the richness and diversity of how life is apprehended that not everyone sees the world in the same way. It is mind-expanding to be challenged by those who commit to another way of life. What a miserably grey one-dimensional place it would be if the dominant model of middle-of-the-road liberal secular capitalism became the only acceptable way of living. Continue reading...
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A challenge to Facebook’s reach and power is long overdue | John Harris (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Mark Zuckerberg’s company feeds utopian delusions, but in reality it is just a billionaire’s media outlet grinding out a fortune “As I look around and I travel around the world, I’m starting to see people and nations turning inward, against this idea of a connected world and a global community. I hear fearful voices calling for building walls and distancing people they label as others.” Related: How Facebook powers money machines for obscure political 'news' sites Continue reading...
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How should you talk to your baby? | Emma Brockes (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Some parents opt for coochy-coo; others prefer a more adult approach. But I’ve found a third way … Baby talk, it’s generally agreed, is silly and self-indulgent and does nothing for the baby, an approach as faulty in its logic as that of the English person speaking louder that the non-English person might better understand him. I don’t do baby talk to my babies. I do, however, do something that, I realised recently, is almost as bad – an over-correction every bit as mannered as pulling faces or piping up in shrill tones – and that is talking to them as if they are 40. There is a rationale for this: it aids language development, increases vocab and doesn’t condescend to the baby. But I suspect that’s not why I or anyone else does it. The real reason, I think, is that it is a discreet form of status signalling, an effort to distinguish oneself from all those pandering helicopter parents and to assert, if only to oneself, that in spite of spending a large part of each day changing nappies or talking about Elmo, one can still formulate a sentence with subclauses. Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on police abuse of women: an offence against society | Editorial (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
When corrupt police exploit victims of domestic violence we are all diminished Abuse of power is the worst of all forms of corruption, as Mike Cunningham, inspector of constabulary and former chief constable of Staffordshire police acknowledged in a BBC radio interview this morning . For the protector to turn abuser is, for the victim, an individual catastrophe – not least because she or he may never trust the police again. But the damage it causes to trust in wider society may, because of its wider implications, be even more grave. When a police officer abuses a victim of domestic violence, or any other vulnerable person, who has sought them out for help, it is an offence against the people the police exist in order to serve. Earlier this year when Theresa May was still home secretary, she commissioned Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary to find out how widespread such abuse is. The conclusions of the report that has just been released are shocking, but not surprising. In the two years to March, 436 allegations of abuse of power for sexual gain were made against 306 police officers, 20 police community support officers and eight staff. Yet only 40 officers or staff have been dismissed for abusing authority for sexual gain in a similar period. Forces appear to regard this kind of corruption inconsistently, with some treating it much more seriously than others. Even more than a generation later, it is as if there is still a lingering echo of the notorious canteen culture once identified in a mid-1980s report which portrayed police as racist and sexist, and not always entirely sober. More than a third of forces, according to the HMIC, need to improve their treatment of victims of domestic violence. Continue reading...
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson: plain speaking without a purpose | Editorial (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Bluntness can be valuable, but foreign secretaries should deploy it for a reason and not on a whim A foreign secretary, Harold Macmillan observed, is forever poised between cliche and indiscretion. It should be no surprise that Boris Johnson – who is, as a better diplomat might say, the possessor of a lively mind – tilts persistently toward the latter. His avoidance of the circumlocutions favoured by most politicians led to a popular misconception that he is a straight shooter. It would be more accurate to say that he frequently shoots from the hip or goes off half-cocked, as his public criticism of Saudi Arabia, revealed by the Guardian, shows. When he was a columnist, MP or mayor of London his remarks could be embarrassing and offensive; now that he is Britain’s top diplomat the potential consequences are far graver. As shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer observed this week, those watching from Brussels “are not particularly amused by jokes about prosecco [or] references to ‘cake and eat it’. They want a professional, constructive set of negotiations.” Though diplomacy has many registers it is often associated with a delicacy that may seem overly cautious at best, hypocritical at worst, and ridiculous either way. (Even when diplomats are blunt they call it being “honest”, “candid” or “forthright”.) But as Mr Macmillan’s remark reminds us, there is a reason why foreign secretaries usually speak with care, even when it frustrates them. First, some messages are delivered privately either because that is more effective or to avoid offending. Riyadh already knows that, while the UK supports the Saudi-led coalition formed to back the ousted president Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, it has concerns about airstrikes which have repeatedly hit civilians, schools and hospitals. It also knows that the UK considers its other interests in the region more important. Second, the ability of people with very different cultures, histories, priorities and interests to engage with each other on complex and fraught issues depends upon a shared language. A more honest language might well be better; but what matters most is that it is consistent, so that diplomats understand each other. When a foreign secretary chooses between muted or harsh criticism, or between dropping a word in someone’s ear and calling them out in a speech, such calculations are – or should be – part of the message. To veer from one register to another haphazardly leads to confusion or contempt. Continue reading...
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I didn’t endorse May’s Brexit timetable – but I’m no ‘enemy of the people’ | David Lammy (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Hurling abuse at anyone who dares mention that 48% of the country voted to remain in the EU will do nothing to bring our divided country back together If this government is to be the one -nation government it claims to be, the personal attacks that fuel the abhorrent “enemies of the people” rhetoric that we have seen of late must stop. The Tory MP and former attorney general Dominic Grieve has warned that the “vitriolic abuse” hurled at anybody who says anything that counters the hard Brexit mantra is leading us to a very bad place. Continue reading...
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Work should be a route to a better life, but people need to be paid properly | Stefan Stern (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Millions of UK workers are living in poverty due to high housing costs, cuts to working-age benefits and persistently low wages. As a society, we could, and should, do better Labour isn’t working. That is to say: working for a living is not providing a living, at least not for the 7.4 million people, which includes 2.6 million children, who are living in poverty despite being in working households. And yet how can this be? Hasn’t there been a “jobs miracle” in this country? Unemployment is below 5%, and there are more people at work here than at any time before. There has been steady if unspectacular economic growth over the past few years, and the national minimum wage has risen quite sharply, for the over-25s at least. The official numbers – some of them – look pretty good. Something is amiss. Continue reading...
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Time magazine didn't give Trump devil horns. God did | Jonathan Jones (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Why is there a Twitter fantasy about his satanic cranial outgrowths? Because his election really does feel like something out of a horror film Time magazine denies doing it on purpose, yet the sign is there. The mark – and this one is much more visible than the 666 that I have been told by a maverick Vatican priest is tattooed on Donald Trump’s left buttock. Related: Photographers on their best Trump shot: 'I think he's a damaged person' Continue reading...
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Speak to immigrant students like me before you ‘deprioritise’ them | Sharon Akaka (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Theresa May should not penalise children who are determined to study hard and do well for something that is outside their control I arrived in the UK from Nigeria with my family at the age of eight to join my dad who lived here. All through my schooling, my parents were trying to sort out their immigration status. It’s a long and complicated process that ended with multiple appeals and applications. Lots of money was spent on lawyers, and we only received our status – “limited leave to remain” – after I had left school. The stress of my immigration issues was one of the reasons I studied so hard: my education was something I could control; the immigration case was out of my hands, but studying was up to me. Continue reading...
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Heard the latest Christmas story? It’s about how UK banks pay all their taxes | Prem Sikka (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Major financial institutions are involved in routine tax avoidance. But a report by the City of London Corporation and PwC raises more questions than it answers A new report ostensibly lauding the tax contribution of UK banks and insurance companies should provide no festive reassurance. Issued by the City of London Corporation and PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) it claims that, against all the odds, the financial sector is making a heroic contribution to the UK public purse. Gosh, only if that were true. From a sample of 50 financial services companies, including banks, building societies and insurance companies, it extrapolates that for the year to 31 March 2016 the financial sector made a contribution of £71.4bn to the public purse, or about 11.5% of the total UK tax receipts. Newspapers sympathetic to the finance industry have latched on to the headline figures, but the fine print of the report tells another story. Continue reading...
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The police are still ignoring sexual abuse by officers. It’s time for zero tolerance | Sandra Laville (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The macho culture of the police is being exploited by officers to prey on the vulnerable victims they are supposed to protect When the Guardian first exposed how police officers in England and Wales were abusing their power to sexually assault and exploit victims of crime, we had no idea of the scale of the problem. Today, we have more of a clue as Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary has revealed that hundreds of police officers are being accused of sexually abusing victims and suspects – and inspectors believe the problem is even more prevalent than the numbers suggest. Our original investigation was more than four years ago and was prompted by the conviction and subsequent jailing of Northumbria police constable Stephen Mitchell, who raped and sexually assaulted vulnerable women he met on duty. Examining the details of that case, various themes emerged; a lack of supervision, a failure to properly vet officers and the turning of a blind eye to the sexual exploits of male officers, in a still macho police service. Continue reading...
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Desperate commuters, it’s time for a rebellion the government can’t ignore | Polly Toynbee (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Southern rail’s appalling service means people are losing jobs, while in the north lines are left to rot. Train users must take action now Politicians foolish enough to search for “Britishness”, those ineffable qualities and values that define who we think we are, conjure up strings of imagined characteristics, virtually all of which have turned out to be wrong. No, we are not the tolerant, moderate folk we pretend: the Brexit vote put an end to that notion, as we, the country that has taken a tiny number of refugees, vote to keep out foreigners at any price, however self-harming. As the Germans take a million refugees and the Italians and Greeks absorb thousands a week, imagine the paroxysms of national hysteria if the Isle of Wight suddenly received Lampedusa’s boatloads of migrants every day. Continue reading...
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Don't assume Trump is dumb. He knows exactly what he's doing | Richard Wolffe (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
His Taiwan call was written off as a gaffe. Actually, like so much else, it was more calculated than it seemed Whatever the Trump era represents, it surely marks the dawn of a golden age of satire. But beware of laughing too much: the joke might be on us. Yes, Trump tweets like a buffoon. But we should not assume that all the missteps by the petulant president-in-waiting are down to ignorance: they aren’t. Related: It's Trump's America now. Time to get over our attachment to facts | Richard Wolffe Continue reading...
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Brexit helps kill Francis Maude's hated civil service 'rank and yank' system (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The coalition’s discredited staff appraisal system is just one of the Whitehall programmes being junked as Brexit looms Civil service unions are celebrating the apparent end of the much-loathed “rank and yank” performance management system introduced by former Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude in 2013. The system forces managers to identify the bottom 10% of performers in their workforce as part of a controversial “guided distribution” appraisal system that has been criticised from the start by unions, managers and staff. One senior civil servant described it as the worst thing they’d seen in a 40-year career.
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We are to blame for the decline of giraffes. And only we can save them | Jules Howard (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Deforestation, civil wars and hunting have put giraffes on the vulnerable species list. Now we must show these creatures the other side of human nature Imagine entering a museum of the future. Imagine walking across its great marble floors, dodging the schoolchildren and parents with buggies, past the toilets and the gift shop and down the corridor marked Mammals. Imagine marvelling at the bones and fossil teeth of mammoths, sabre-toothed tigers and giant ground sloths. Now, pause. You are in shadow. You are in the shadow of an enormous towering skeleton of an extinct creature which stands almost 20ft high, with a long neck upon which a horny skull sits, within which would have been a tongue almost as long as a human arm. “On whose watch did such a creature face extinction?” those future museum visitors might ask. Related: Giraffes facing extinction after devastating decline, experts warn Continue reading...
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Brighton Argus editor departs, but does Newsquest really care? (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Publisher refuses to explain why yet another of its editors, one respected by both his staff and his audience, has left the ailing newspaper Mike Gilson, the best editor the Brighton Argus has had in many a long year, has left the newspaper in somewhat mysterious circustances. Staff have not been informed why he has gone. The managing director of Newsquest Sussex, Tony Portelli, did not return a phone message. However, his personal assistant, who also acted as Gilson’s secretary, did confirm that he had departed. Continue reading...
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For Chris Grayling trains are always about ideology, not passengers | Christian Wolmar (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The leak of the transport secretary’s letter shows he is willing to take out his political frustrations on London’s mayor – and Southern rail commuters When the railways were privatised in the mid-1990s, ministers took it in turns to say this would mean that government would no longer be able to interfere. Tell that to Chris Grayling, the Conservative transport secretary, who is set to be the most politically motivated of recent transport ministers, and seems to be spending most of his time playing with trains. The leak of a letter he wrote to Boris Johnson, the then Conservative London mayor, three years ago expressing his opposition to handing over more of London’s suburban rail services to a future Labour mayor, demonstrates that political considerations – rather than a desire to improve the lot of benighted commuters – appear to dominate Grayling’s decision-making process. Continue reading...
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No Bregrets: Sunderland after the vote to leave the European Union – video (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Sunderland’s surprise vote for Brexit was seen by remain supporters as turkeys voting for Christmas. But now that Nissan, the car maker that employs 7,000 people directly and a further 40,000 in the supply chain, has announced that it is staying in its Sunderland plant, Helen Pidd speaks to north-east voters and asks how they feel now about leaving the European Union MPs visit Sunderland to ask what city wants from Brexit negotiations Continue reading...
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Trump Force One v Air Force One: how do they compare? – video (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
President-elect Donald Trump has called for Boeing to scrap its $4bn contract to update the government’s Air Force One fleet. He says the deal is ‘ridiculous’ and that he would rather fly in his own plane, a Boeing 757-200. So how do the two aircrafts compare? Continue reading...
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Greg Lake of King Crimson and ELP fame dies aged 69 – video obituary (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Greg Lake, one of the key figures in the prog rock boom of the 1970s, has died at the age of 69 on Wednesday. He was known as a third of the prog supergroup Emerson, Lake and Palmer, but first came to prominence as a founding member of King Crimson. For non-prog fans, Lake was best known as the maker of one of the UK’s most enduring Christmas hits, I Believe in Father Christmas Greg Lake, legendary prog rock bassist, dies aged 69 Continue reading...
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After Calais: what has happened to the refugee children? – video (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Six weeks after the Calais migrant camp was demolished, unaccompanied minors scattered around France are still waiting to hear of their fate from the Home Office. Lisa O’Carroll, Mat Heywood and John Domokos meet one young refugee who fled death in Darfur desperate to be reunited with his radiographer brother in Liverpool Sudanese refugee in UK voices fears for brother stranded in France Continue reading...
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Sleaford Mods on Brexit: 'You can't ignore things any more' – video (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
In early 2014 the Guardian hailed duo Sleaford Mods as ‘the most uncompromising British protest music made in years’. Here, we go backstage at a Sleaford Mods gig in their hometown of Nottingham to hear what singer Jason Williamson thinks about Brexit and the politicians drawing up the rules, while fans applaud the band for representing the world they live in WARNING: contains swearwords Continue reading...
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If fascism arrived tomorrow, would we recognise it? – video (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
Britain likes to think it doesn’t do fascism – we beat Hitler, after all. But, asks Rachel Shabi, are we complacent? Would we miss the signs if fascism was appearing under our noses? She argues that today’s climate, with the far right resurgent around the world, gives us cause to be more vigilant than ever Continue reading...
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The Story So Far - Brexit Means... Podcast (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
Introducing ‘Brexit Means ...’ our new in-depth Brexit podcast with the Guardian’s European affairs correspondent Jon Henley. In this first episode we look back at the brief history of Brexit: from David Cameron’s fateful promise to hold an ‘in/out’ referendum to Theresa May’s tautologous mantra that ‘Brexit means Brexit’ Welcome to the Guardian’s new Brexit podcast, Brexit Means... In the coming months we’ll be hearing from Britons and Europeans, Leavers and Remainers, politicians and ordinary people, economists, businessmen, lawyers, researchers, campaigners and many more about what Brexit means for them, for the UK and for the EU, how it might work – and how it might not. Continue reading...
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Saudi artist: Standing Rock protesters are warning us to save what we can – video (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
After the US Army Corps of Engineers denied a permit for the Dakota Access pipeline to drill under the Missouri river, Saudi Arabian artist Ahmed Mater joins protesters at Standing Rock to celebrate their victory. This is the fifth episode in our Crossing the line series, in which a group of Middle Eastern artists embarks on a US road trip exploring common concerns Standing Rock protesters asked to ‘go home’ by Sioux leader Continue reading...
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The 24-hour emergency hotline for Syrian refugees – video (lun., 05 déc. 2016)
Mohammed Abu Amar runs a makeshift 24-hour helpline from his flat in Hamburg, guiding scared refugees fleeing the violence in Syria across the water to Europe. Despite losing the use of both legs in a shelling in Damascus in the early days of the conflict, Abu Amar made the crossing with his family in 2013. He subsequently found his calling, being constantly available on the phone for his fellow Syrians making the same perilous journey Continue reading...
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Antony Gormley's iron men come alive for A Winter's Tale – video (ven., 02 déc. 2016)
Writer Frank Cottrell-Boyce and director Carl Hunter reimagine Shakespeare’s late tragedy in an otherwordly film set among the statues of Antony Gormley’s installation Another Place on Crosby beach, Liverpool. This is the 10th film in the British Council’s series Shakespeare Lives in 2016, celebrating the playwright on the 400th anniversary of his death. King Lear in a care home: Phil Davis plays the storming monarch – video Continue reading...
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Lawyer urges supreme court to throw out Brexit case after article 50 vote (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
In closing remarks, government QC James Eadie says Commons vote to back leaving the bloc is legally relevant The supreme court has been urged to throw out a momentous legal challenge to the government’s powers to trigger Brexit, with Downing Street lawyers claiming parliament’s support for exiting the EU was conclusively demonstrated this week. In closing remarks at the end of a four-day hearing, James Eadie QC, appearing for the government, said a House of Commons vote held on Wednesday that backed leaving the bloc by 448 to 75 was “legally relevant” to the complex case. Continue reading...
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Capita to replace staff with robots to save money (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Outsourcing giant to axe 2,000 jobs and use ‘proprietary robotic solutions’ after clients cut spending following Brexit vote A British outsourcing company whose contracts include collecting the BBC licence fee is to replace staff with robots as it slashes costs. Capita, a FTSE 100-listed firm that also runs the London congestion charge, said it needed to axe 2,000 jobs as part of a cost-cutting drive in response to poor trading. Continue reading...
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Self-harm by children rises steeply in England and Wales (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Nearly 19,000 children received hospital treatment for self-harm in 2015 – a 14% increase since 2012 Nearly 19,000 children and young people were treated in hospital in England and Wales after self-harming in the last year, a figure that has risen steeply in recent years, according to a leading children’s charity. Related: NHS figures show 'shocking' rise in self-harm among young Continue reading...
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Jon Lansman vows stay in Momentum (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Jeremy Corbyn ally’s move follows claims that grassroots group has been taken over by Trotskyists and could split Jon Lansman, the founder of Momentum and a close ally of Jeremy Corbyn, has promised to fight for his key role in the grassroots organisation following claims that it has been taken over by Trotskyists and could split. Related: Momentum is a beacon of hope. It must be saved from the saboteurs | Owen Jones Continue reading...
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Iraq human rights lawyer admits string of misconduct charges (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Phil Shiner has admitted paying an agent to find him clients and acting improperly in claiming UK army mistreated civilians A human rights lawyer who was pursued by the government after an inquiry rejected allegations that British troops murdered and tortured Iraqi civilians has admitted paying a middle man to find his clients in Iraq. Phil Shiner, whose most high profile case exposed the torture and death of Baha Mousa at the hands of British troops in Basra in 2003, has admitted a string of misconduct charges, a disciplinary tribunal was told on Thursday. Continue reading...
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More foreign holidays will mean more skin cancer, scientists predict (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
A 78% increase in non-melanoma skin cancer may see the cost to the NHS of treating the disease rise to £465m a year by 2025 The number of Britons developing the two most common forms of skin cancer will increase as a direct result of people getting tans on foreign holidays and in salons, experts are warning. Related: Scientists closer to understanding why red hair genes increase skin cancer risk Continue reading...
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Mark Serwotka has heart transplant at Papworth (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Leader of the Public and Commercial Services union became ill after apparently contracting a virus from his dog Mark Serwotka, the leader of the largest civil service union, has had a successful heart transplant operation, with the medical team at Papworth hospital, Cambridgeshire, saying they were very happy about how the new heart was performing. Related: Make it easier to deselect MPs, says Corbyn ally Mark Serwotka Continue reading...
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Sadiq Khan takes Transport for London into new business territory (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The London mayor insists he can honour his election pledges by making his transport agency operate more efficiently Rows about the finances of Transport for London (TfL) were prominent during this year’s election campaign and also a bit odd. For years, Conservatives had claimed that the large and powerful mayoral agency is a bloated bureaucracy in need of ruthless trimming, yet there was the Tory candidate – a Mr Goldsmith, you might recall - insisting that it could not cope with its fares being frozen for four years, while Labour man Sadiq Khan was pledging to transform it into a paragon of enterprise and efficiency. Seven months on from Khan’s big win, the first TfL business plan of his mayoralty has appeared. The sums are there on paper. So are Khan’s ambitious plans. Political opponents, naturally, say neither add up, with Tory AM Keith Prince worrying that the number crunching bites too deeply into TfL’s reserves and even using the word “socialist” to describe them - on Her Majesty’s BBC too! He also points out, quite correctly, that borrowing is going to soar. Continue reading...
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Hostile states pose 'fundamental threat' to Europe, says MI6 chief (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Although Alex Younger does not name specific country, he makes clear that Russia is target of his remarks The head of the British intelligence agency MI6, Alex Younger, has said cyber-attacks, propaganda and subversion from hostile states pose a “fundamental threat” to European democracies, including the UK. In a rare speech by an MI6 chief while in office, Younger did not specifically name Russia but left no doubt that this was the target of his remarks. Russia has been accused of interfering in the US presidential election and there are concerns it could do the same in French and German elections next year. Continue reading...
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No new inquiry into killings by British troops, say Northern Irish police (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Denial follows newspaper report that officers would reinvestigate 302 killings that took place during the Troubles Police in Northern Ireland have no plans to launch a fresh inquiry into killings carried out by British troops during the Troubles. The force issued the statement after a front-page report in the Sun said officers would reinvestigate all 302 killings carried out by British troops. The paper said at least 500 ex-servicemen, many now in their 60s and 70s, would be “viewed as suspects” during the process. Continue reading...
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Corbyn stance on EU immigration 'risks helping Ukip' (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Labour leader’s support for free movement will alienate supporters outside London, says Welsh first minister Carwyn Jones Jeremy Corbyn’s approach to immigration is too London-centric and risks driving Labour supporters into the arms of Ukip, Carwyn Jones, the first minister of Wales, has said. Jones, the most powerful Labour politician in government, disagreed with the position of Corbyn and his shadow home secretary, Diane Abbott, who have both defended freedom of movement between the UK and the rest of the EU. Continue reading...
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Man who harassed MP Luciana Berger online is jailed for two years (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Joshua Bonehill-Paine was found guilty of writing antisemitic blogs about the Labour politician, leaving her feeling ‘under attack’ A man who harassed Luciana Berger, the Labour MP, in a string of antisemitic online rants has been jailed for two years after a trial at the Old Bailey. Joshua Bonehill-Paine, 24, wrote five hate-filled blogs about Berger, the MP for Liverpool Wavertree. He variously called her a “dominatrix” and “an evil money-grabber” with a “deep-rooted hatred of men”. In one, he claimed the number of Jewish Labour MPs was a “problem”. Continue reading...
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New diabetes treatment could eliminate need for insulin injections (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Tested in mice, therapy involves a capsule of genetically engineered cells implanted under the skin that release insulin as required A cell-based diabetes treatment has been developed by scientists who say it could eliminate the need for those with the condition to inject insulin. The therapy involves a capsule of genetically engineered cells implanted under the skin that automatically release insulin as required. Diabetic mice that were treated with the cells were found to have normal blood sugar levels for several weeks. Continue reading...
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Court rejects bid to halt Southern train drivers' industrial action (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Owners of Southern railway had argued overtime ban and strikes broke European law guaranteeing people’s right to travel The high court has rejected an attempt by the owners of Southern rail to prevent train drivers from taking industrial action. The operators of Southern, Govia Thameslink Railway, had argued that the action by members of the Aslef union, which includes an overtime ban as well as impending strikes, was contrary to European law guaranteeing the rights of people to travel and of companies to invest, with GTR being partially owned by the French firm Keolis. Continue reading...
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Tata Steel jobs: regulator warns of pension hurdles (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Unions have agreed deal to save 8,000 jobs but company must resolve issues with pension scheme, says watchdog The Pensions Regulator has warned there are still major hurdles to overcome to secure the future of Tata Steel’s UK pension scheme, which is pivotal for saving the Port Talbot steelworks in south Wales. Tata Steel and trade union leaders have agreed a deal to save 8,000 jobs in the steel industry and the Port Talbot steelworks, with the Indian company committing £1bn of new investment to its UK business. Continue reading...
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Brexit does not have to be bad for UK exporters, north-east firm tells MPs (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
It is easy to export ‘if you make products people want’, Ebac founder John Elliott advises MPs on fact-finding mission A manufacturer in the north-east has told MPs that Brexit does not have to be bad for British exporters, boasting that his firm has just struck a lucrative, long-term deal with a French company. John Elliott, the founder and chairman of Ebac, which makes water coolers, washing machines and dehumidifiers from a factory in Newton Aycliffe, County Durham, said trade tariffs were “not the end of the world”. Continue reading...
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Corporate spy infiltrated anti-asbestos campaign, court told (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Two activists and a lawyer involved in campaign are claiming aggravated damages from K2 Intelligence Ltd A leading corporate intelligence firm infiltrated the worldwide campaign to ban asbestos in a sophisticated and long-running espionage campaign, the high court in London has heard. Over a period of four years, the court was told, a spy working for K2 Intelligence Ltd masqueraded as a sympathetic documentary maker in order to gather a mass of sensitive material about the leading figures in the campaign, their methods, funding and future plans. Continue reading...
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Sheffield council leader ignores calls to resign over 5am tree felling operation (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Campaigners in Sheffield say 4,000 trees have gone since private finance deal was signed with contractor Amey in 2012 A council leader has ignored calls to resign over a pre-dawn tree-felling operation in which five people were arrested. Simon Crump and Calvin Payne were detained in the battle over Sheffield’s tree-felling programme. Continue reading...
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Underground coal gasification will not go ahead in UK (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Government says it will not support highly polluting method of releasing gas from coal seams A highly polluting method of extracting gas has been effectively killed off in the UK after the government said it would not support the technology. Underground coal gasification, which involves injecting oxygen and steam underground to release gas from coal seams, would massively increase UK carbon emissions if exploited, according to a government-commissioned report. Continue reading...
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One in 14 people now waiting for operations as demand on NHS soars (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
NHS England figures show number of people awaiting non-urgent surgery is at highest level since December 2007 Demand for medical care is rising so fast and hospitals are so busy that one in 14 people in England are now waiting to have a non-urgent operation. NHS England figures released on Thursday show the number of people awaiting hospital treatment reached 3,754,961 in October – the highest level recorded since December 2007. Continue reading...
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Norovirus cases at highest level for five years this winter (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
1,704 cases of diarrhoea and vomiting bug are already confirmed in England, 55% higher than during same period last year Levels of the vomiting bug norovirus in England this winter are the highest for five years, figures reveal. Data from Public Health England (PHE) shows that 1,704 cases of norovirus in England have been confirmed by laboratory testing so far this season, which is 9% higher than the average for the same period over the past five years. Continue reading...
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White Helmets in east Aleppo plead for help after regime advances (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Rescue group says volunteers fear for their lives as Syrian army, backed by Iranian militia, approaches rebel-held areas The Syrian White Helmets rescue group has urged international organisations to protect its volunteers in rebel-held parts of eastern Aleppo, warning that they face torture and execution. The rescue group said it believed it had less than 48 hours before the Syrian army, backed by Iranian militia, reached the districts in which it has been operating. Continue reading...
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Children's characters may disappear from unhealthy food in Netherlands (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
‘Licensed media characters’ like Dora the Explorer and Miffy would no longer be used to target young children under initiative by Dutch food industry Famous children’s characters such as Dora the Explorer may soon disappear from some commercial food packaging in the Netherlands to discourage unhealthy eating habits, food industry representatives have said. The decision was made after “public debates on the impact of advertising targeting children”, the umbrella Dutch Food Industry Federation (FNLI) said. “Obesity is a problem over which the food industry is greatly concerned.” Continue reading...
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Dinosaur tail trapped in amber offers insights into feather evolution (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Fragment complete with fossilised bones and traces of muscles, ligaments and mummified-looking skin dates from around 99 million years ago A length of fluffy plumage discovered within a piece of amber has been identified as part of a dinosaur tail, offering new insights into the evolution of feathers. Around 3.7cm long, with chestnut-coloured feathers on the top and pale feathers underneath, the tail was found complete with fossilised bones as well as traces of muscles, ligaments and mummified-looking skin. Continue reading...
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UN criticises Israel settlement law that would legalise 4,000 West Bank homes (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
United Nations high commissioner for human rights says bill to retroactively legalise settler homes is a clear violation of international law The UN human rights chief has strongly criticized a bill in Israel that would legalise some 4,000 settler homes in the occupied West Bank, saying it would clearly violate international law. Israeli lawmakers voted on Wednesday to advance the bill, which would retroactively legalise settler homes built on private Palestinian land. Continue reading...
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Oakland fire victims: teacher, students and pivotal local artists among the dead (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Friends and family mourn the victims of the devastating ‘Ghost Ship’ warehouse fire that sent shockwaves through the vibrant underground scene The victims of the devastating fire that killed 36 people in Oakland, California, were artists, musicians, activists, community organizers and other young people who came together for a party at the “Ghost Ship” warehouse on Friday night. Related: Oakland warehouse fire is product of housing crisis, say artists and advocates Continue reading...
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Facebook court filings hint at possible political future for Mark Zuckerberg (ven., 09 déc. 2016)
Lawsuit over extent of CEO’s control of company shows board voted to give him two-year leave if he serves ‘in a government position or office’ Mark Zuckerberg may intend to pursue government service while retaining control of Facebook, according to recently unsealed court filings in a case pitting the CEO against minority investors. The class-action lawsuit was first filed in late April, after Zuckerberg proposed a corporate shake-up that would dilute the voting power of shareholders – giving him “eternal control” of the company, in the words of the shareholders’ lawyers. Text messages excerpted in the court documents reveal that Zuckerberg and two board members discussed the CEO’s possible government service, and argued about how to present it to shareholders. Continue reading...
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Vietnam dredges reef disputed with China (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Activity on Ladd Reef in Spratly Islands runs risk of angering Beijing and Taiwan Vietnam has begun dredging work on a disputed reef in the South China Sea, satellite imagery shows, the latest move by the communist state to bolster its claims in the strategically important waterway. Activity visible on Ladd Reef in the Spratly Islands could anger Hanoi’s main South China Sea rival, Beijing, which claims sovereignty over the group and most of the resource-rich sea. Continue reading...
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Chechen leader claims his troops eager to fight 'scum' in Syria (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Ramzan Kadyrov offers vocal support for close ally Vladimir Putin amid reports of Chechen battalions being readied for transit Chechnya’s strongman leader, Ramzan Kadyrov, has said that troops in the Russian province would be happy to fight the “scum” in Syria if they receive the Kremlin order. Related: Murder in Istanbul: Kremlin's hand suspected in shooting of Chechen Continue reading...
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Tsunami warning cancelled after South Pacific earthquake (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Quake of 7.7 magnitude had put residents on alert in Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Papua New Guinea and other island countries Buildings have been damaged in the Solomon Islands after a 7.7 magnitude earthquake struck off the coast early on Friday, but fears of a tsunami receded after initial warnings to numerous islands. Loti Yates, from the National Disaster Management Office in the capital Honiara, told Australia’s ABC there were reports of houses crumbling in parts of the country, including on the island of Makira, the largest in Makira-Ulawa province. Continue reading...
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Belgian prince under fire after hitting out at politicians 'bugging' him (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Prince Laurent, younger brother of King Philippe, told a journalist ‘This is really starting to piss me off’ when quizzed about his business ventures The king of the Belgians’ younger brother faces a dressing down from the country’s prime minister after demanding that politicians and the royal family “stop bugging” him over claims his business ventures are losing money. The summons from the prime minister, Charles Michel, amid some concern for the stability of the monarchy, came after Prince Laurent, a sports car-loving 53-year-old, let off steam at a journalist who quizzed him over the financial health of his renewable energy interests. Continue reading...
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Daniel Barenboim opens Berlin music academy for Middle East students (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Composer says school, which will take in 90 new talents from the region each year, is ‘attempt at creating peace through music’ Daniel Barenboim has called it an “experiment in utopia”, a project that marks the culmination of the leading musician and conductor’s life’s work in bringing together musicians from the Middle East. The Barenboim-Said Academy, which opened on Thursday evening in Berlin, will offer 90 talented students from the Middle East the chance to study classical music under the maestro himself as well as a raft of other top musicians and composers. Continue reading...
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Uber tries to solve sexual misconduct issues by banning riders from flirting (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Ride-share company releases guidelines that include no vomiting and other ‘not OK’ behaviors that could see people permanently banned from service Uber released a new set of rules for passengers on Thursday, banning vandalism, “vomiting due to excessive alcohol consumption” and flirting. It is the first time Uber has published specific guidelines for passengers. The rules set out specific examples of unacceptable behaviour, and people flouting the rules could be permanently banned from the service. Continue reading...
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Charleston shooting trial: jury shown graphic images of aftermath (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Court sees series of photos showing victims lying in pools of blood, following earlier failed motion by Dylann Roof’s attorneys for mistrial Horrific images depicting the bloody aftermath of the Charleston church massacre were shown to the jury on Thursday on the second day of the federal trial of Dylann Roof, the 22-year-old white supremacist accused of murdering nine black parishioners during a brutal hate crime. The series of 360-degree photographs taken from inside the Mother Emanuel church, where Roof opened fire on a group of congregants during a Bible study class, showed the bodies of eight of those killed lying in pools of blood, surrounded by bullet casings. Continue reading...
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Prada found wanting in assessment of forced labour safeguards (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Ralph Lauren and Hugo Boss also perform modestly in study of quality and transparency of efforts by leading fashion firms to protect against forced labour Prada, one of the world’s most expensive fashion brands, is making little effort to show that its goods are free of forced labour, according to a new report. An assessment (pdf) of the quality and transparency of efforts by 20 major apparel companies to safeguard against forced labour from their supply chains, undertaken by KnowTheChain, an accountability initiative, gave Prada a score of nine out of 100. Continue reading...
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Top official in Italy's M5S increases call for referendum on euro (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Alessandro Di Battista hints at Italy’s possible exit from single currency as key issue for next election after PM resigns A top official in the Italian anti-establishment Five Star Movement (M5S) is ratcheting up his party’s call for a referendum on the euro, signalling that Italy’s possible exit from the single currency could become a central issue in the next election. Alessandro Di Battista, 38, who is a prime contender to represent M5S in the next poll, said in an interview with German newspaper Die Welt that he did not support an exit from the EU but did support a referendum on the euro. Continue reading...
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'Pizzagate conspiracy' gunman: 'I regret how I handled the situation' (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Edgar Welch, who fired rifle in Washington DC restaurant at heart of ‘fake news’ story, says he was trying to do some good The gunman who fired an assault rifle inside the Washington DC restaurant at the heart of false allegations of a VIP child-sex ring has said he now regrets his actions. “I just wanted to do some good and went about it the wrong way,” Edgar Welch, 28, told a reporter from the New York Times, adding: “I regret how I handled the situation.” Continue reading...
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German firms including BMW pull advertising from Breitbart (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Boycott comes as rightwing website plans to launch new services in France and Germany in time for pivotal 2017 elections Major German companies including BMW have stopped advertising on Breitbart, the rightwing US news and opinion site that campaigned for Donald Trump and plans to launch in Europe before key elections next year. The boycott, prompted by a social media campaign titled KeinGeldFürRechts or No Money for the Right, follows a similar decision by Kellogg’s in the US, to which Breitbart responded by urging readers to stop buying the cereal firm’s products. Continue reading...
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Possible MH370 debris found by relative of disappeared passenger (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Piece of board found by one of seven relatives who flew to Indian Ocean island to raise awareness of need to hand in debris thought to be from plane A Chinese man who travelled to Madagascar in search of answers to the disappearance of his mother on Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 has found a possible piece of debris from the plane during a search of the country’s beaches. Jiang Hui, 44, is one of seven relatives who flew to the Indian Ocean island on Saturday to raise awareness of the debris that has been washing up on its beaches in ever-increasing amounts and conduct preliminary searches. Continue reading...
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EU met only 5% of target for relocating refugees from Greece and Italy (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Only 8,162 people of the promised 160,000 have been resettled from the two countries at the frontline of the migration crisis European countries have relocated only one in 20 of the refugees they promised to shelter, amid continuing deep divisions over how the continent should help growing numbers fleeing war and persecution. More than a year after the EU promised to disperse 160,000 refugees from overstretched Greece and Italy to other EU countries, only 8,162 people have been found a home, figures from the European commission show. Continue reading...
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McDonald's to scrap Luxembourg tax structure (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Fast-food chain’s reorganisation means £800m from restaurants in Europe will flow through the UK instead McDonald’s is to scrap its controversial Luxembourg tax structure in a corporate shakeup that means $1bn (£800m) of income from fast-food restaurants across Europe will flow through the UK instead. The move comes 12 months after Brussels competition officials announced a state aid inquiry into the fast-food chain’s arrangements in Luxembourg, where franchise and royalty fees from across Europe have been pooled for the past seven years. Continue reading...
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Trump names fast food executive Andy Puzder to head labor department (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Puzder, chief executive of CKE Restaurants Inc, which operates the Carl’s Jr and Hardee’s, often argues that a higher minimum wage would hurt workers Donald Trump has named fast food executive Andy Puzder to head the US Department of Labor, in an appointment likely to antagonize organized labor. Puzder, chief executive of CKE Restaurants Inc, which operates the Carl’s Jr and Hardee’s fast-food chains, has been a vociferous critic of government regulation of the workplace. Continue reading...
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Artist publishes spoof photos despite fear of being sued by Trump (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Alison Jackson says ‘litigious’ president could have chilling effect on artistic freedom as she publishes book featuring Trump lookalike Artist Alison Jackson has said that she chose to self-publish spoof photographs of Donald Trump as part of a protest against the potentially chilling effect a “litigious” president could have on artistic freedom. The celebrity lookalike specialist said she was warned by her lawyers against publishing the images, some of which feature a Trump lookalike in compromising situations, and that no book publisher was prepared to release a collection of the Trump images. Continue reading...
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Supreme court Brexit hearing: 10 things we learned (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
From the royal prerogative and Henry VIII clause to what makes lawyers laugh – and how to interpret a judge’s choice of tie Fundamental to the government case is this prerogative conferring ancient royal powers, including to make treaties, on politicians. The government argues that it is these powers that allow ministers to trigger article 50 without parliamentary legislation. Continue reading...
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Boy George: ‘We’re all clinging to a rock, and some people have got a better grip than others’ (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Nine years sober and back on tour, the Culture Club star talks about the power of positivity and why pop needs mystery I can tell you from bitter experience that there are more relaxing ways of preparing for an interview with a legendary pop star than reading their memoirs and unexpectedly stumbling across a page where they explain at some length why they think you’re an arsehole. But there it is, or rather there I am, on page 133 of Boy George’s second autobiography, 2006’s Straight, getting it in the neck as the result of an unnecessarily sour live review I wrote years and years ago. Worse, I think he’s probably got a point; although I didn’t say he had never written a good song, I did say “Culture Club never had many good songs to start with”, which rather reckons without Time (Clock of the Heart) and Victims and It’s a Miracle, among others, let alone his solo songs such as 2013’s gospelly power ballad King of Everything. At least I can console myself with the fact that I’m in pretty glittering company on the old blacklist: over the course of Straight, he lets pretty much everyone have it, from George Michael (“please shut up – throw her a cerise boa”) to Prince (“the Artist Formerly Known As Get a Personality”). Nevertheless, it’s hard not to arrive at his publicist’s office with a degree of trepidation. But no, we’re all good. He has long distanced himself from Straight – he told an interviewer a couple of years ago that it was “the rantings of a deranged drug user”, written during a grim spiral that culminated in him ending up in prison in 2009 for assault and false imprisonment. He says he can’t remember the review in question, and he doesn’t bear grudges. “I forgive very easily, and I suppose, in the same way, I expect to be forgiven very easily as well. I grew up with that. My dad was very explosive, God rest his soul. He could fly off the handle like no one I’ve ever known, and I have definitely got that in my personality, that ability to sort of smash the house up and then say: ‘Put the kettle on,’ to have that kind of attitude of: ‘Well, I’m OK now, so everybody else has got to be OK.’ People are like: ‘No, I’m not OK, you just screamed at me,’ and I’m like: ‘Yeah, but get over it.’” Continue reading...
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X-rated: who was the most hopeless X Factor winner? (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
It’s the final of the 13th series of the talent-show-that-wouldn’t-die this weekend. Which cruise singer is now back singing on cruises and who was last seen turning on the Christmas lights in West Brom? Continue reading...
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The Birth of a Nation review – biblical passion and cheesy emotion (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Nate Parker’s heartfelt account of Nat Turner, the slave who led a rebellion in 1830s Virginia, is conventionally paced but achieves a dark and sinuous poetry Nate Parker’s fervent movie about the slave uprising led by Nat Turner in Virginia in 1831 pointedly gets its title from the silent black-and-white classic by DW Griffith, who claimed hero status for the Ku Klux Klan, and whose own adored father Jacob “Roaring Jake” Griffith had been a slaveholder in Kentucky and a confederate colonel in the civil war. Parker ultimately finds his own meaning in the title by linking the boys who witnessed Turner’s eventual hanging with the generation who went on to fight for the north. No feature film has been made before on Nat Turner; the subject is new, the style very much less so. It is pretty conventionally paced, directed and scored, almost cheesy in its emotional effects, without the radical attack and visual flair of Steve McQueen’s 12 Years a Slave and without the depth of that movie’s performances. Parker has said that Turner is “not so far removed from an African-American version of Braveheart’s William Wallace”. His reference is to the historical figure, not the film, but the comparison is interesting, and with its sentimentalised vision of a personal angel on the gallows, Parker’s film does incidentally look a little like Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ. There is comparable conviction and force. Continue reading...
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Welcome to the age of anger | Pankaj Mishra (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The seismic events of 2016 have revealed a world in chaos – and one that old ideas of liberal rationalism can no longer explain The election of Donald Trump as president of the United States is the biggest political earthquake of our times, and its reverberations are inescapably global. It has fully revealed an enormous pent-up anger – which had first become visible in the mass acclaim in Russia and Turkey for pitiless despots and the electoral triumph of bloody strongmen in India and the Philippines. The insurgencies of our time, including Brexit and the rise of the European far right, have many local causes – but it is not an accident that demagoguery appears to be rising around the world. Savage violence has erupted in recent years across a broad swath of territory: wars in Ukraine and the Middle East, insurgencies from Yemen to Thailand, terrorism and counter-terrorism, economic and cyberwar. The conflicts, not confined to fixed battlefields, feel endemic and uncontrollable. Hate-mongering against immigrants and minorities has gone mainstream; figures foaming at the mouth with loathing and malice are ubiquitous on old and new media alike. Continue reading...
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Burst your bubble – again: five conservative articles to read this week (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Looking for more rightwing perspectives to balance your news diet? Here’s some more pieces analyzing Trump’s foreign policy, sanctuary cities and populism Reading rightwing authors and sites is not an exercise in empathy. It’s about seeing what we can learn from and about them. In the Donald Trump era, it’s also about observing the contradictions in the incoherent coalition that elected him, and between that coalition and what’s left of the Republican establishment. Here are five pieces by conservative outlets and authors to read this week. Related: Burst your bubble: five conservative articles to read this week Continue reading...
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Theresa May cuts Boris Johnson adrift ahead of his visit to Gulf (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
PM’s slapdown for foreign secretary over Saudi comments renews questions over suitability for role as UK’s chief diplomat Faced with a choice between admonishing her foreign secretary or damaging UK strategic interests in the Gulf, in which she had just personally invested such capital, Theresa May saw only one option – to cut Boris Johnson adrift. Thursday’s slapdown will do him little good in cabinet, or benefit his standing in the Gulf, to which he now travels, no doubt offering his trademark apologies and explanations to the Saudi royal family. Continue reading...
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'Impunity has consequences': the women lost to Mexico's drug war (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
At least 50 women disappeared in the Veracruz capital of Xalapa over three nights in 2011 – just some of the thousands of victims in the 10-year battle against drug trafficking Lizbeth Amores dropped off her son at her mother’s house before heading to a house party with her friend Verenice Guevara. They were last seen at a bar popular with local gangsters. The following night, María de Jesús Marthen was among a dozen or so young women invited to a private party at a ranch about an hour east of the city centre. On her way to the event, Marthen messaged her boyfriend, pleading for help. Continue reading...
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Neil Young: Peace Trail review – a political dream defaced (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Armed only with righteous anger, Neil Young punctures this knocked-together protest project with half-formed songs full of confused platitudes Neil Young is a man audibly proud of his work ethic. “I can’t stop working, because I like to work when nothing else is going on,” he sings at one point during Peace Trail, his 40th studio album (with a further eight live albums, three soundtrack albums, eight “archive” albums, 11 unreleased albums, and three with Buffalo Springfield). And who can blame him? Not for Young the usual lot of the septuagenarian rocker, with its calm routine of gigs dutifully packed with greatest hits. Three years ago, his shows with Crazy Horse prompted audience walk-outs and aggrieved letters to the press from fans horrified by virtually everything about them, from the sheer volume to the setlist to the length of the songs. Not for Young the slowing of pace suggestive of the gentle slope to retirement. Peace Trail is his second album of 2016, arriving less than six months after the puzzling hour-plus of blatantly overdubbed and Auto-Tuned live recordings, fake adverts and animal noises that was Earth. Over the last five years, he’s positively churned it out: seven new albums, three archival live releases, two books, plus his own portable digital media player and download service. It would be lovely to report that all this is evidence of a grand artistic Indian summer, a man teeming with fantastic ideas as the autumn of his years draws in. But it isn’t. The portable digital media player clearly didn’t pan out as Young would have liked; the books would have been better with a firm editing hand applied to them and the new albums were of wildly variable quality, a phrase you could usefully apply to Young’s entire discography since the death in 1995 of producer David Briggs, the one man who seemed capable of reining him in and calling out his less inspired notions. That the best of the recent albums might well be a collection of covers, 2014’s A Letter Home, suggests something a bit dispiriting about the standard of Young’s latterday songwriting. Continue reading...
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Pantone's 'greenery': can it bring hope and colour to 2017? (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The global authority has predicted its shade for 2017: greenery, the universal shade of hope. Fingers crossed Pantone, the Nate Silver of colour, has revealed its predicted shade for 2017. Given our inability to foresee how 2016 would pan out, making any prediction about 2017 feels dangerously dicey, even if it is only about a colour. Still, seeing as last year’s shade was in fact two – rose quartz and baby blue – which could have alluded to the division and confusion thrown up by the seismic events of the past 12 months, maybe we should take note. Continue reading...
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'Democracy was hijacked. It got a bad name': the death of the post-Soviet dream (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Independence 25 years ago promised to bring freedom and prosperity to central Asia, but kleptocratic regimes have left many yearning for the past The road out of Kommunizm, a small town in southern Tajikistan, is badly paved and bumpy. Like most things here it was built long ago, when the ruling ideology that gave the settlement its name was still thriving. Home to just 7,000 inhabitants, Kommunizm was at the very edge of the Russian empire, first tsarist then Soviet; a mere 50 miles from Kunduz in northern Afghanistan. Continue reading...
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Baywatch trailer – the Rock, Efron and lots of babes. It's going to be a smash (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Sexy figures in the surf at sunset, Dwayne Johnson on a burning boat and the inexplicable continuation of Zac Efron. It must be the new Baywatch film The Baywatch remake seems to have been years in the making; a throwback to the days when Starsky & Hutch temporarily made spoofy adaptations of deadly serious TV shows a viable prospect. But, now – finally – the first Baywatch trailer is here. Can it beat the odds and actually offer everything it promises while staying relatively faithful to the original? Let’s find out. Continue reading...
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Are small publishers doing all the hard work for the big ones? (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
These days, it is minimally staffed and funded firms who invest in new authors. The giants avoid such risk, only picking the writers once their names are made Paul McVeigh and Kirsty Logan are authors you may have heard of. Both of their debuts were published by Salt, an independent publisher. Paul McVeigh’s The Good Son was shortlisted for a bunch of awards, and won the Polari first book prize this year. Kirsty Logan’s The Rental Heart and Other Fairytales won three awards — including the Polari in 2015— and Logan had her next book published with Harvill Secker, a division of Penguin Random House. The same trajectory is likely for Paul McVeigh. It’s a familiar story. Independent publishers have existed since the 19th century; it wasn’t until the 20th and the 21st that we saw the industry dominated by a few corporations. “The Big Four” publishers – Simon & Schuster, Penguin Random House, Hachette and HarperCollins – have grown big by buying up small publishers. Hogarth, for example, was founded by Leonard and Virginia Woolf in 1917; now it is an imprint at the Crown Publishing Group, which is in turn a part of Penguin Random House – which itself used to be Penguin and Random House before their merger in 2013. Phew. Continue reading...
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Thursday’s best TV: Who Do You Think You Are; The Apprentice; Extraordinary Weddings (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Liz Bonnin is disturbed to find that her ancestors were involved in the slave trade; The Apprentice candidates sample gin; plus tales of challenging nuptials Science and nature presenter Liz Bonnin visits Trinidad and Martinique to explore her Indian and French roots. Both halves of her family have histories involving slavery or indentured labour, and Bonnin is braced for the shame of learning that some of her antecedents treated humans as chattels. In fact, a happier story emerges, with a running theme of people strong-willed enough to discard the strictures of the times they were living through. Jack Seale Continue reading...
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Why electric cars are only as clean as their power supply (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Experts argue whether electric cars are worse for the environment than gas guzzlers once the manufacturing process and batteries are taken into account Jorge Cruz has just finished his overnight shift stacking shelves at Whole Foods in Los Altos, California, and is waiting at the bus stop outside. Like much of Silicon Valley, there’s a regular flow of Tesla, BMW, Nissan and Google electric cars that cruise past from their nearby headquarters, and Cruz rather likes them. “I really wouldn’t mind having an electric car,” he says, though his first choice is probably a Honda or an Acura. Regardless, for now, he rides the bus. “I need to save up for a car,” he explains. Continue reading...
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The safety-pin has become 'a thing in itself' - fashion archive, 1933 (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
7 December 1933: The humble safety-pin has grown in grace of recent years The safety-pin is usually looked upon as having a humble role. It is used on anti-scratch lines for mere youth, while maturer years look upon it as a very present aid in time of trouble, and more shoulder-straps and more garters are established by means of safety-pins than most people would care to admit. Safety-pins have, however, grown in grace of recent years, and they may be had in colours – though these necessitate greater thickness - and also on little gold rings, without which assorted sizes no one would venture to travel and expect to enjoy the process. The safety-pin seemed to reach its apotheosis when it was given at their christenings to babies in a gold version to fasten their bibs, even though the occasion for this had not yet appeared. Equally, it held in place the manly tie, and men felt greater and grander and nobler for its possession. Still, it was not general. The gold pin became purchasable for threepence, and perhaps the gold crisis caused the disappearance of the truly gold safety-pin in the interests of a vast number of shillings to the ounce. Continue reading...
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As temperatures drop, Lily’s charity is working to keep homeless people alive | Frances Ryan (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
There’s a new homeless crisis in Britain as a cocktail of cuts simultaneously swells the numbers of street sleepers while denying them state-funded shelter “It’s the increasing numbers that shocks people,” says Lily Axworthy, 25, from the Greater Manchester Winter Night Shelter (GMWNS). “I walk to work and see eight or nine people sleeping in doorways. There’s people sleeping in the car park where I leave my car. And that’s only what you can see. People are under bridges, in parks, in tents.” The story of GMWNS – set up by Lily, a charity worker, in 2015 – could be a snapshot of poverty in modern Britain. The scale is spiralling, austerity has fostered it, and – miles away from ministers in Westminster – it’s a team of volunteers left to pick up the pieces. Continue reading...
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Best albums of 2016: No 7 Anti by Rihanna (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Forget its shambolic release – the Barbadian singer offered a masterclass in shapeshifting on her most defiant record yet More of the best albums of 2016 More on the best culture of 2016 Critics hailed it as the messiest album release campaign in recent memory. Rihanna’s eighth record was delayed, leaked and eventually given away, with the singer hosting an incongruous event in which she unveiled braille poetry in between. The press rejoiced when it looked as if one of the biggest artists on the planet had sold only 1,000 copies in a week, with tabloids suggesting that Rihanna’s muddled head – from a much publicised fondness for weed – had caused Anti’s alleged flop. But while the convoluted nature of partnerships with Tidal and Samsung were largely responsible for the record’s poor commercial performance in traditional terms, it was a streaming smash and later went double platinum. And the fact that so many people were quick to celebrate her supposed failure simply complimented the album’s unflinching temperament. For a decade, Rihanna has worked in an industry that expects its female starts to be slick and subdued, and Anti was the musical manifestation of her rejection of the rules. Like an antihero in a neo-noir crime film, Rihanna was sophisticated and fearless. An arch, ominous atmosphere ran through this record, from the gunslinging ballad Desperado to the instructive slow-jam Yeah, I Said It. Continue reading...
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​She Loves Me review – witty and seductive musical is an old-world delight (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Menier Chocolate Factory, London The cult 1960s show lives up to its Broadway pedigree and the performances are perfectly pitched in this skilful, intimate staging “This may be the best production of She Loves Me I’ve seen,” said the show’s 91-year-old lyricist, Sheldon Harnick, in a first-night curtain speech. Since I missed the London productions in 1964 and 1994, it’s the only one I’ve seen and I must say it’s a delight. Even if the show itself is sweetly romantic rather than emotionally overwhelming, it is staged by Matthew White with rare elegance and wit. The piece has a long pedigree. It derives from a play by Miklós László that has been twice filmed, and given that Carousel was also based on a Hungarian play, it suggests there is a thesis to be written on the country’s influence on the modern musical. The show marked, in 1963, Hal Prince’s Broadway debut as producer-director and, even if only a modest success, acquired a cult following. It is based on a simple idea: Georg and Amalia, who work in a parfumerie, quietly detest each other, unaware that they are anonymous lonely hearts correspondents. In two sub-plots, we follow the amorous adventures of the skittish perfume-pusher, Ilona, and the marital misfortunes of the store’s owner. Continue reading...
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The 10 best video games of 2016 (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
From the fiendish classic that tests your sausage-cooking skills to the summer of Jigglypuffs and a return to first world war battlefields, here are 2016’s best video games More on the best culture of 2016 In some ways, the fourth title in Naughty Dog’s wildly successful action adventure series looks like the archetypal join-the-dots sequel. We’re still following roguish Nathan Drake as he scours the planet for ancient artefacts. We’re still solving simple environmental puzzles and shooting the bad guys. And the script still plunders just about every cliche it can from the Indiana Jones films. Continue reading...
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The best Christmas food tested by Ruby Tandoh, Felicity Cloake and Yotam Ottolenghi (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
We asked our favourite food writers and chefs to try the best mince pies, panettone, salmon, gravy, stuffing, biscuits, port and more Betty’s Classic mince pies £10 for 12 ★★★★★ The best of the mince pies come from the Yorkshire bakeries of Betty’s. The pastry is golden, lightly toasted and rich, and I like the well-spiced filling, brightened with plenty of zest. They’re wonderful, but coming in at a tenner for a dozen, they’re maybe not ones to waste on the kids. Continue reading...
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10 of the best winter city breaks in Europe: readers’ travel tips (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Glühwein and hot chocolate, snowy views, empty museums and comfort food … Guardian readers pick the best European cities for an atmospheric winter holiday The best way to see Zurich is from the top of its own mini mountain, Uetliberg, from where you get a view of the whole city, the lake and the countryside with mountains in the distance. It’s particularly magical in winter when everything is dusted with snow and the toboggan run is open – two miles of downhill fun from Uetliberg to Triemli! You can hop on a direct train from Zurich main station to the mountaintop, which takes just 20 minutes and costs CHF8.60 (around £7) one way. Take in the views and then hire a sledge for the journey down the Schlittelweg. Night sledding with flashlights is also on offer for those who want to take it up a notch. Finish off a day of outdoor fun on the mountain over a cheese fondue or with a glass of mulled wine or hot chocolate at one of the many Christmas markets around the city. Nicenumber Continue reading...
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'If you choose to be alone you can't be lonely': meet the modern-day hermits | Guardian readers and Sarah Marsh (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The hermit tradition has endured in some cultures for millennia. But what does it mean today? We meet those who are cut off for a variety of reasons In 2013, police came across a man in the US state of Maine stealing food from a local summer camp at night. It appeared to be a simple case of theft at first. But what was going on was far more unusual. According to reports, Christopher Knight, then 47, had walked into the woods at the age of 19 and never came out. He built himself a makeshift shelter and survived by taking food from nearby homes and camps, just as he was doing on the night he was caught. Knight had hardly spoken to anyone during his entire time in solitude. It’s not clear why Knight dropped out of society, but it happened a year after he graduated from Lawrence high school in Fairfield about 1986. The only big interview he did was with Michael Finkel, an American journalist. The article appeared as a series of conversations for GQ magazine. Knight, who has been given a possible diagnosis of Asperger syndrome, a form of autism, said he couldn’t explain why he left society. He told Finkel: “I found a place where I was content.” Continue reading...
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The best places to study for a degree in Europe (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Studying at a European university is a chance to learn a new language, make friends – and escape £9k tuition fees Studying abroad is a fun way to grow up. You travel. You meet new people. You get out of your comfort zone. It shows you’re willing to get out, leave your home town, and go see the world. As it stands, some European countries enable Brits to study without paying tuition fees or incurring anywhere near as much debt as they would in the UK. Living costs can also be cheap. Many learn a new language and experience a different teaching style. Some stay on and find jobs. Others fall in love and life takes a different direction altogether. Whatever comes of it, studying in Europe is worth considering. Here’s a roundup of our top destinations: Continue reading...
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Wine: why it pays to look beyond the usual Christmas suspects (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Chardonnay, burgundy, bordeaux are all very well, but look to the new world for alternatives, and you may find a bargain There’s always a tendency (one that’s very much encouraged by the supermarkets) to revert to the classics at Christmas. I’m guilty of it myself: just as you’re safe if you stick to turkey instead of, say, a leg of pork, if you put a bottle of bordeaux or Châteauneuf-du-Pape on the table, you know it’s going to go down well with elderly rellies (and some of the flashier younger ones). But it does a disservice to treat “new world” wine countries solely as a source of everyday rather than celebratory drinking, especially when they often represent better value than some of the big names. Continue reading...
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Two spicy Thai salad recipes: fish and beef laaps (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Chillies bring more than heat to Thai cooking. As these laap salads show, they play to regional strengths, awaken the mouth, lift other flavours, add aroma and nuance … On landing in Bangkok last year, restaurant manager Luke and I went straight to Khua Kling Pak Sod, tucked away on Thonglor Soi 5. Usually packed, this restaurant serves what’s described as authentic southern-style Thai food: that means spicy as hell and heavier on the coconut cream than the sour, pungent dishes from further north, which we touched upon last week. We’re feeling intrepid as we order, which the waiter clearly notices, cocking his head as we choose the dishes. Continue reading...
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Christmas gift guide 2016 (jeu., 01 déc. 2016)
Browse our interactive gift guide, share your favourites and create your ideal Christmas wish list Continue reading...
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What’s the best cheap laptop for running Minecraft? (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Claire wants to buy her son a laptop to run Minecraft with Pixelmon mods. Her budget is £300, but she’s willing to spend a more Continue reading...
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Readers recommend playlist: your songs about disbelief (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Motörhead, Gary Numan, the White Stripes and a Tamil film classic make this week’s reader-curated theme playlist – as does an intriguing African EMF cover Here is this week’s playlist – songs picked by a reader from your suggestions after last week’s callout. Thanks for them all. Read more about how our weekly readers recommend series works at the end of the piece. Funny thing, belief. Most of the time, you don’t exactly choose it, you’re either convinced or you’re not. It might be the evidence, it might be an overwhelming need or desire to believe that something is true – or untrue. Either way, the reasons we give for believing, or disbelieving, may not be our real motivation. Continue reading...
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What do you make of the Sleaford byelection? (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
If you’re a resident in the constituency of Sleaford and North Hykeham, share your thoughts ahead of Thursday’s byelection When Stephen Phillips resigned as MP for Sleaford and North Hykeham, he cited a lack of parliamentary scrutiny on the Brexit process, and unease at the government’s treatment of child refugees and changes to international aid. Related: Sleaford ​​and North Hykeham voters express impatience over Brexit Continue reading...
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Readers recommend: share your songs about finishing (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Make your nomination in the comments and a reader will pick the best eligible tracks for a playlist next week – you have until Monday 12 December As we reach the final month of the year and the chequered flag of 2016 edges into view, we’re looking for your songs on the theme of finishing. You have until 11pm on Monday 12 December to post your nomination and make your justification. RR contributor Sarah Chappell (who posts as AFictionHabit in the comments) will select from your recommendations and produce the playlist, to be published on 15 December. Continue reading...
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Danielle de Niese webchat – your questions answered on opera, sore throats and The Sopranos (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The classical star talked about making opera affordable, her heroes and whether she’d snog Elton John 2.28pm GMT Ok guys! So they're chucking me out of the Guardian office now. Actually it's the webchat that's expiring shortly... but it's been so great to chat with all of you. Thank you for stopping by. There are a couple of people (DouglasBateman, wryobserver, dhc1970) whose questions I wasn't able to answer directly for two reasons: 1) time constraints, and 2) I actually had already answered the same question in an earlier post. I hope you'll find the answers further down the chat, and... sorry! Thank you so much for supporting classical music and classical artists through new digital forms, and please please please, if you love classical music and classical artists, tune in to BBC4 on December 18 to watch the premiere of my documentary Birth of an Opera: Danielle De Niese on The Barber of Seville. Birth of an Opera: Danielle de Niese on The Barber of Seville is on BBC Four on Sunday 18 December at 7pm – the documentary follows her preparation for the role of Rosina. 2.20pm GMT unclearleo asks: Do you sometimes wake up in the middle of the night yearning for the Phantom? ...of the Opera? Continue reading...
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Recipe swap: share your clementine recipes (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Share your clementine recipes with us for a chance to have them printed in Cook We’ll name the Guardian home cook of the year on 31 December. In the meantime, please share your recipes for clementines. Email recipes@theguardian.com, upload them to theguardian.com/witness or post them on Instagram @guardian_cook #RRS #clementines by noon on Wednesday 14 December. Selected recipes will appear in Cook and online on 7 January. You can share your clementine recipes by clicking on the ‘Contribute’ button on this article. You can also use the Guardian app and search for ‘GuardianWitness assignments.’ Continue reading...
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What do people in Germany think of the burqa ban? (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
We want to hear from people in the country, including supporters of Islam, about the proposed partial ban on the burqa and the niqab in Germany Angela Merkel has endorsed her party’s call for a partial ban on the burqa and the niqab in Germany. Showing her support for this for the first time, she told delegates at the Christian Democratic Union’s conference in Essen “the full facial veil is inappropriate and should be banned wherever it is legally possible”. This week the German chancellor’s CDU party is expected to pass a motion proposing a ban on the full-face veil in some areas of public life such as courts, schools and universities and during police checks. Continue reading...
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Is your library under threat? Share your experiences with us (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
If your local library is facing closure or cuts to funding we’d like to hear from you Nearly 9,000 people in Sheffield have signed a petition to try and prevent the city’s central library building being turned into a five-star hotel. Campaigners are urging the council to reject a deal with the Chinese company Sichuan Guodong Construction Group, however the local authority says the art deco, grade II-listed building needs £30m worth of repairs, which it cannot afford after cuts to its budget by central government. Continue reading...
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What does the future hold for integration and multiculturalism? | Letters (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
Louise Casey may be right that “huge progress” has been made in achieving social integration in recent years (Opinion, 5 December). But policies relating to integration have not improved much. In the early 1980s, the Commission for Racial Equality, of which I was chairman, defined integration in a multicultural society “as a way of describing how different people, with different religions, languages and attitudes, can establish sufficient common ground to enable them to live together (without trying to become the same as each other), in justice and peace”. Integration, so defined, is incompatible with multiculturalism, if that is thought to encourage separate development, separate schools, separate housing and – “surely not”, we wrote at the time – separate laws. The key words in that definition are “common ground” and “justice”. Values, British or other, are slippery things to instil in schools or elsewhere. Our laws are not. Political correctness, if it allows people to break the law, is itself unlawful. So are certain forms of discrimination. What everyone needs to understand is that they are free to believe in actions that are unlawful but if they, or institutions such as schools, act in accordance with those unlawful beliefs, or incite others to do that, they may be prosecuted or closed down. What need to be avoided are policymakers who preach integration and then, as in England’s school system these days, practise disintegration by encouraging the creation of as many separate types of school as possible. Sir Peter Newsam Thornton le Dale, North Yorkshire Continue reading...
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Tech talk: your tech for Christmas questions answered (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
Editors and writers from the Guardian’s tech team joined readers for a live Q&A in the comments between 11am-1pm (GMT) on 7 Dec – catch up below! Want to ask us about whether the Pixel is better than the iPhone? If VR is really the future? Or how good that new Touch Bar on the new MacBook Pro is? Experts from the Guardian’s technology desk, including Jonathan Haynes, Samuel Gibbs and Alex Hern, will be online and in the comments from 11am-1pm (GMT) answering your tech questions and discussing the latest issues – join them now. We’ll round up some of the best discussion, advice and expert opinion in a blog post after. Continue reading...
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Who said it, Arron Banks or Mary Beard? (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
Ukip donor Arron Banks got a Roman tangle with classical historian Mary Beard on Twitter Insurance multi-millionaire and Ukip funder Arron Banks found himself in a Twitter debate with prominent classicist and historian Mary Beard on Monday evening. The topic: ancient Rome, and whether immigration was to blame for the Empire’s fall. Our quiz is taken from their social media exchanges (no peeking). Can you tell who said what? Continue reading...
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Was series of rapid games best way to decide world chess championship? (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts Was the “rapid” playoff – four quick games with an initial time limit of 25 minutes per player, with the threat of even faster “blitz” and “Armageddon” games to follow – really an appropriate way to decide the recent world chess championship final in New York, where Magnus Carlsen defeated Sergey Karjakin? James Thomson, Manchester Continue reading...
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'A very British form of privatisation': readers on Grayling's rail plans (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
Plans for a fully privatised railway line between Oxford and Cambridge was met with scepticism from our readers Britain could be set for a fully privatised rail line, as transport secretary Chris Grayling outlines plans for a new line connecting Oxford and Cambridge. Related: Chris Grayling unveils plans for fully privatised rail line Continue reading...
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'All London's subcultures existed side by side': your memories of Camden Market (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
As Camden Market faces redevelopment, readers share their stories and memories of London’s famous hub of counterculture – from punks in the 70s to Roundhouse squat raves in the 90s – and how the place has changed Uncool Camden: will redevelopment ruin London’s legendary market? “I was born just down the road. There are too many stories to share, I remember the first ‘silly boot’ hanging outside the shops, the Irish poets who drank with me in the pub at 14 and told me to change my name back to proper Irish. Friends made things and sold them at the market. Camden Lock was where we met friends and made new ones. Continue reading...
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Saline views: your art on the theme of North Sea (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
We asked you to share your art on the theme of North Sea. Adrian Locke, senior curator at the Royal Academy of Arts, has selected his favourites. Share your artwork for this month’s theme on oracle by clicking on the button below Continue reading...
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O is for oracle: share your artwork now (mar., 06 déc. 2016)
For this month’s art project, Director of Exhibitions and Curator at Tate Modern Achim Borchardt-Hume invites you to share your artwork on the theme of oracle Saline views: your art on the theme of North Sea As you look at this image of Robert Rauschenberg’s Oracle imagine the sound of splashing water. Now add the crackle of a local radio station and finally picture lights flashing in semi-darkness. “Listening happened in time. Looking also had to happen in time,” Rauschenberg once said. As much a sculpture made from stuff found in his New York neighbourhood – ‘gifts of the street’ as the artist liked to call it – Oracle is a piece of theatre. It is also great fun to watch [as is Mud Muse with its 100 gallons of bubbling bentonite mix made soon after and on view in the room next door at Tate Modern’s current exhibition]. Rauschenberg worked on Oracle at the same time as his silkscreen paintings of the recently assassinated John F. Kennedy, icons of 1960s Pop Art. The transistors used for the sound transmission were cutting edge technology at the time. He loved collaboration, in this instance with the Swedish engineer Bill Klüver. Continue reading...
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'More radical solutions are needed': Italians on the referendum (dim., 04 déc. 2016)
Italians explain how the referendum on political reform has morphed into a battle between populist forces and the status quo Italians will vote on a series of changes to the country’s political system on Sunday, in a vote that could have far-reaching implications for the country’s politicians, banking sector and future in the Eurozone. But what began as a vote on whether to simplify the country’s elaborate political system has, for many, morphed into a complicated decision over who governs the country. According to Italian voters who responded to a Guardian callout, prime minister Matteo Renzi’s leadership is under close scrutiny. If Italians vote against Renzi’s reforms, the prime minister has said he will resign – a promise that is proving too enticing for some. Continue reading...
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'Lack of representation in parliament is concerning': Sikhs on living in the UK (lun., 05 déc. 2016)
We asked you to share your experiences of being a British Sikh. Here’s what some of you said Almost one in five Sikhs has experienced discrimination in a public place over the last year, according to the UK Sikh Survey 2016. The Sikh Federation, who published the survey, said British Sikhs have been “invisible to the government since 9/11,” and found that those who wear religious clothing, such as the dastar (head covering), are most likely to experience abuse. Continue reading...
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Eating disorders: what is treatment like where you live? (ven., 02 déc. 2016)
Do you feel that local NHS services are up to scratch? Share your experiences with us NHS Digital figures show that hospital admissions for eating disorders in England are increasing. The number of deaths in England and Wales from eating disorders has also risen (from 17 in 2014 to 28 in 2015), according to statistics from the Office of National Statistics. But treatment is patchy. Northern Ireland has no specialist eating disorders unit. Patients are treated in the community but this is currently under review. Wales also has no single condition eating disorder units, although they developing specialist community eating disorder teams for adults. In England there are 186 beds for adolescents and children in need of inpatient care. Continue reading...
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Readers recommend: share your songs about disbelief (jeu., 01 déc. 2016)
Make your nomination in the comments and a reader will pick the best eligible tracks for a playlist next week – you have until Monday 5 December Whether it’s another person’s words, folklore or a wider philosophy being called into question, disbelief is everywhere. We’re looking for your songs on this very theme – which, we believe, is open to interpretation as you see fit. You have until 11pm on Monday 5 December to post your nomination and make your justification. RR contributor Stephen Males (who posts as severin in the comments) will select from your recommendations and produce the playlist, to be published on 8 December. Continue reading...
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Arabic? Polish? Dutch? Your views on the languages schools should teach (jeu., 01 déc. 2016)
The Polish prime minister has called for Polish to be taught in English schools. We asked our readers about other languages that should be on the curriculum What languages should we teach children in schools, and why? The question came to the fore on Monday after the Polish prime minister, Beata Szydło, called on Theresa May to introduce Polish classes in British schools. Continue reading...
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Wildlife on your doorstep: share your December photos (jeu., 01 déc. 2016)
As the northern hemisphere prepares for cold winter months, and the southern hemisphere gets ready for sunny spells, what sort of wildlife will you discover? The temperatures are dropping fast in the northern hemisphere as December signals the start of the winter months ahead. While we’re getting ready for wintry weather, the southern hemisphere will be trying to adapt to the summer heatwaves and plenty of sunshine. So what sort of wildlife will we all discover on our doorsteps? We’d love to see your photos of the December wildlife near you. Share your photos and videos with us and we’ll feature our favourites on the Guardian site. Continue reading...
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Greg Lake obituary (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Key figure in 1970s prog rock as bass guitarist for Emerson, Lake & Palmer Greg Lake, who has died of cancer aged 69, first rose to fame with a brief stint in King Crimson before achieving colossal success with Emerson, Lake & Palmer during the 1970s. Lake was one of the key figures in the creation of progressive rock, and had no time for critics who said that the music was ludicrously overblown. “I know people think we’re pretentious, but it’s really a product of sophistication,” he said in 1973. “Anything that makes demands on the listener could be called pretentious ... but those who are really into it want something more satisfying.” Comprising Lake on bass guitar alongside the keyboards player Keith Emerson and the drummer Carl Palmer, ELP played their debut gig in Plymouth on 23 August 1970, and six days later announced themselves as a new force on Planet Rock with a devastating performance at the Isle of Wight festival, where the bill also featured Jimi Hendrix, the Doors, the Who and Joni Mitchell. At the time they were in the middle of recording their debut album, called merely Emerson, Lake & Palmer. Continue reading...
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Mick Jagger becomes a father for the eighth time at 73 (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The Rolling Stones singer and ballerina girlfriend Melanie Hamrick, 29, delighted by birth of their son in New York Mick Jagger, frontman of the Rolling Stones, has become a father for the eighth time, his publicist has confirmed. The musician, 73, and his girlfriend, 29-year-old American ballerina Melanie Hamrick, welcomed their first son in New York on Thursday. Continue reading...
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Paul Haggis to supply documentary about Flint water scandal (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Lead and Copper will investigate ongoing crisis of untreated water and state of emergency in city in Michigan, US Paul Haggis, director of the Oscar-winning drama Crash, is to produce a documentary about the Flint water contamination scandal. According to Deadline, Haggis is working with director William Hart on Lead and Copper, a film that aims to investigate the ongoing crisis, which began in 2014 after the city in Michigan changed its water supply. As a result, untreated water found its way into people’s homes and locals were exposed to drinking water with high levels of lead. Continue reading...
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Hatchimals scheme 'ruins' novelist Sara Gruen and angers Christmas shoppers (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The Water for Elephants novelist wanted to resell a huge purchase of the must-have toy but cannot do so, leaving frustrated buyers furious Never cross parents of young children on the hunt for the Christmas must-have toy. It is a rule novelist Sara Gruen failed to heed when she snapped up $23,000 (£18,000) worth of this year’s answer to Cabbage Patch Dolls and Furbies to resell. Now her pursuit of a fast profit could ruin her financially, as well as destroy her reputation among irate parents. The Water for Elephants author has been accused of being a Grinch stealing Christmas after she spent $23,595.31 on eBay for 156 Hatchimals toys with a view to selling them on at a profit. The auction website restricts sales of toys likely to pull in counterfeiters. Continue reading...
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Max Porter's 'joyful linguistic invention' wins him young writer of the year award (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Author of Grief Is the Thing With Feathers praised by judges of as ‘bursting with originality’ Max Porter, a novelist “bursting with originality” who was inspired by memories of childhood loss and the work of Ted Hughes, has been named young writer of the year. Related: Grief Is the Thing with Feathers by Max Porter review – words take flight Continue reading...
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Life, Animated's Roger Ross Williams: 'I was a loner – in my own Land of Lost Sidekicks' (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The filmmaker returns to the subject of alienation with his new documentary about a young autistic man who uses Disney films to make sense of the world Three years ago, Roger Ross Williams was looking around for the subject of his next documentary. He had become the first African American filmmaker to win a directing Oscar, awarded for his short film Music By Prudence, which was about a severely disabled Zimbabwean woman, Prudence Mabhena, who overcame prejudice to become a singer-songwriter. In the feature-length God Loves Uganda he charted the campaign in that country to make homosexuality punishable by death. Then an old friend, the Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind, told him about the book he and his wife Cordelia were writing about their son, Owen, who developed autism at the age of two. Owen had only begun to make contact again through dialogue from his beloved Walt Disney films. “He’s using these movies to make sense of the world he’s living in,” explained Ron, whose first proper conversation with his son since the diagnosis was conducted using a toy of Iago, the parrot from Aladdin, and speaking to him in that character’s gravelly voice. Owen was now in his early 20s. He had founded his school’s Disney club, where he encouraged other students with developmental difficulties to watch, analyse and discuss those animated movies. “When I heard about Disney club it clicked,” the 43-year-old director tells me over mint tea in a London hotel bar. “I was, like, ‘This is it. This is my next film.’ God Loves Uganda was such an emotionally draining experience, being embedded in a community which wanted me, as a gay man, to die. Now I was determined to do something upbeat.” Continue reading...
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Rogue One’s Ben Mendelsohn: ‘Star Wars is a childhood dream come true’ (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
It’s taken the actor 30 years to reach the A-list. But with his role as bad guy Orson Krennic, he’s about to go galactic. He talks about being awestruck by Darth Vader – and his lederhosen-wearing youth Rogue One director Gareth Edwards has a nice story about Ben Mendelsohn – who is playing Orson Krennic, chief bad guy in the forthcoming offshoot of the Star Wars franchise. On the day that Darth Vader walked on to the set, says Edwards: “We were just getting ready to shoot the scene, and Ben asked to confer. It probably looked like we were huddling over actor stuff – motivation, tone, whatever. We weren’t. In fact, Ben was like a 10-year-old kid, clenching his fists in total delight and saying [he puts on an Aussie accent]: ‘Mate, look! It’s Darth fucking Vader!’” Mendelsohn says: “It was like the seven-year-old me’s dream come true, 1977, Star Wars. From the ages of six to about 12, you’ll find that’s the peak age range where these movies go straight in – zoom!” He mimes a rocket flying into his face and blowing his kiddie-consciousness into a million pieces. “It hit me at an elemental level, and, for that kid I was then, I’m very glad. I often quip that there were many times in my life when I wish I’d been able to tell myself: ‘Don’t worry about it, one day you’ll be in a Star Wars movie.’ Alas, you can’t do it. And yet …” he chuckles, “here we are.” Continue reading...
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Viola Desmond, Canadian who fought segregation, to appear on $10 note (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Businesswoman will be the first woman prominently displayed on Canadian banknote in latest move by prime minister to promote gender equality Viola Desmond, a black businesswoman who challenged racial segregation in Canada in 1946, will be the new face of the C$10 bill, the government said on Thursday, making her the first Canadian woman to be prominently featured on a banknote. Desmond refused to leave a whites-only Nova Scotia movie theater in an incident that took place nearly a decade before Rosa Parks’ refusal to move to the segregated part of a bus in the United States. Desmond was subsequently jailed, convicted and fined. Continue reading...
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Philippe Sands uses book prize to raise £60,000 for charity (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
After the winner of the 2016 Baillie Gifford award announced plans to give away £30,000 award, other parties have more than matched it A month after Baillie Gifford winner Philippe Sands announced he would donate his £30,000 prize money to charity, the writer has revealed Médecins Sans Frontières, SOS Méditerranée and Women for Refugee Women will receive more than £20,000 each after his donation was matched by other parties. Related: Philippe Sands: 'Alarm bells are ringing in this country' Continue reading...
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Michael McIntyre – the new king of Saturday night. Who knew? (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
McIntyre may be a floppy-haired berk who has built a career out of listing things people do, but his cheeky Big Show is the best weekend variety telly in years Let me begin by running through some basic facts we all know to be true. First, Michael McIntyre isn’t funny. Second, Michael McIntyre doesn’t so much tell jokes as just baldly list things that people do. Third, Michael McIntyre is a floppy-haired berk with a shrill voice who doesn’t deserve any of his success. OK, good. Now that we’re all agreed on that, here’s something I’ve reluctantly come to realise. Michael McIntyre’s Big Show is the best Saturday evening variety show in years. God, that felt weird. Continue reading...
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Sprucing up Robert the Bruce: Scottish king's face gets 3D treatment (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Facial reconstruction experts use cast of skull to recreate Bannockburn hero’s face in 3D digital images The heavy-set face of Robert the Bruce, the father of Scottish independence, has re-emerged from the shadows nearly 700 years after his death. Facial reconstruction experts at Liverpool John Moores University have released 3D digital images of the Scottish king, who led the Scots to victory against the English at Bannockburn in 1314, that show a privileged and muscular man, with large, broad features. Continue reading...
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Schoolchildren design Theresa May's first Christmas cards as PM (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Three young designers from May’s Maidenhead constituency created cards that carry a simple festive greeting Three schoolchildren from Theresa May’s Maidenhead constituency have designed the festive cards for her first Christmas as prime minister. Jade Windsor, 11, drew a picture of 10 Downing Street with a Christmas tree and flying union flag, and an image of the prime minister’s Christmas dinner. May has said she prefers to cook roast goose rather than the traditional turkey on Christmas Day. Continue reading...
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Testimony by Robbie Robertson review – Bob Dylan’s buddy and the Band (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Dylan’s one-time best friend and Martin Scorsese’s creative partner tells of music, drugs and self-destruction In his early years, Bob Dylan always seemed to need a confidant, an accomplice, a sidekick. These semi-famous figures, silhouetted against the penumbra of his growing celebrity, included Victor Maymudes, his tour manager and protector during the rapid ascent to fame in the early 1960s, and Bob Neuwirth, a fellow graduate from the folk clubs, with whom he perfected the art of the slashing verbal putdown, as immortalised in DA Pennebaker’s documentary film of Dylan’s 1965 British tour, Don’t Look Back. But when the singer returned to Britain in 1966, his new best friend was someone capable of making a serious contribution to the development of his music. In Robbie Robertson, Dylan found the perfect buddy on every level – for a while, at least. As the guitarist with the rock’n’roll band that came out to join him for the second half of each concert during a controversial tour, Robertson provided Dylan with moral as well as musical support when the howls of outraged folkniks attempted to drown the amplified crunch of Like a Rolling Stone. Born in Toronto to a part-Mohawk mother and a Jewish father, at 22 he was two years younger than Dylan and had been on the road since leaving home in his mid-teens to audition for a job with Ronnie Hawkins, a gnarled rock’n’roll veteran, and his crack band, the Hawks. After six years of playing bars and clubs to rough, tough audiences, he was able to help Dylan navigate his way through a hostile time. Continue reading...
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Best photos of the day: a Russian light show and a rodeo (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The Guardian’s picture editors bring you a selection of photo highlights from around the world, including celebrations at the Hermitage and a US rodeo Continue reading...
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The eyes of the city: 20 years of street photography – in pictures (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
From 1977 to 2001, photographer Richard Sandler regularly walked the streets of New York and Boston, capturing all that the streets had to offer The Eyes of the City by Richard Sandler is published by powerHouse books Continue reading...
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Vintage black male glamour – in pictures (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
A new book by Nichelle Gainer brings to prominence the sartorial elegance of black men from the world of music, film and sport. Each photograph is accompanied by a profile of these men who epitomised black glamour. Vintage Black Glamour: Gentlemen’s Quarters is published by Rocket 88 Books. Continue reading...
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The painter in a hurry: Ernst Haas's colour masterpieces – in pictures (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
The photographer of the Marlboro man turned his lens on a much more mysterious side of America in amazing colour-saturated shots of the US Continue reading...
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A quest for tribes: the world's indigenous peoples – in pictures (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Jimmy Nelson spent four years documenting the world’s indigenous cultures for his Before They Pass Away project. This week, new and archive images go on display at Brussels’ La Photographie Galerie Continue reading...
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Eyewitness: Seoul, South Korea (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Photographs from the Eyewitness series Continue reading...
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Steve Bell on Trump as Time magazine's person of the year – cartoon (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
Continue reading...
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Christmas tree farming in Scotland – a photo essay (mer., 07 déc. 2016)
Over eight million real trees are bought over the festive period in the UK. Graeme Robertson visits the Edenmill Christmas tree farm for the harvest with his drone, and follows one tree to its new home Continue reading...
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Satellite Eye on Earth: November 2016 – in pictures (jeu., 08 déc. 2016)
Ancient water channels in Morocco, declining Arctic sea ice and the US-Mexico border were among the images captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites last month A bank of clouds covers East Java to the west, with a bright sun overhead casting shadows from the clouds along the ocean surface. Sunglint, an optical effect caused by the reflection of sunlight off the water surface directly back at the satellite sensor, exposes the waves created by the movement of currents in the ocean water. Internal waves are generated when the interface between layers is disturbed, such as when tidal flow passes over rough ocean floors, ridges, or other obstacles. The Lombok Strait, a relatively narrow passageway between Bali (west) and Lombok (east), allows flow of water from the Pacific Ocean into the Indian Ocean. The bottom of the strait is complex and rough, consisting of two main channels, one shallow and one deep. Because of the variation in water movement due to the complexity of the channels and ocean interface, the tides in the strait have a complex rhythm but tend to combine about every 14 days to create an exceptionally strong tidal flow. It is the combination of rough topography, strong tidal currents, and stratified water from the ocean exchange that makes the Lombok Strait famous for the generation of intensive internal waves. Continue reading...
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